What are YOU doing to 'batten down the hatches'?

duceditor

Squier-Axpert
May 29, 2014
15,091
The Monadnocks, NH USA
We see threads here -- quite appropriately! -- on how various of us are dealing with the crazy increases in the guitars we love -- and such things as shipping costs (and reliability). But what, I am wondering, are folks here doing about the changes in costs that may be effecting the other and larger parts of their lives.

This came to my mind when doing something totally mundane. My weekly food shopping.

I've read a good deal about the scarcity of goods -- food stuffs included -- in the national 'pipeline.' Things that the mass media only touch upon for the supposedly 'helpful' scare headlines such can help provide. More serious reading has predicted -- that by neccesity -- what is now apparently starting to happen. Something that for the first time was real and in my 'face' this morning when seemingly half of what was on my shopping list was simply unavailable. Produce. Meats. Dairy. Romaine lettuce for instance. English cucumbers. Eggs. Yogurt. And this ignoring what such has of late cost. No. It was simply unavailable.

Fuel? Heating oil? (5 dollars a gallon! ???)

Are you starting to see and feel the pinch of these things? How are you dealing with it?

The one thing Jan and I have decided is that we are going to flex as needed and not allow ourselves to have a 'woe is me' attitude.

If one food stuff is unavailable (as was so this morning again and again) then we will simply change how and what we eat to match was is available.

We, fortunately, have to drive little. (What are you who must drive a lot doing to cope?)

Our property -- that of our entire town -- was just a month or so ago re-evaluated as to it 'worth' -- that for taxes. It went up a 33%! That in one year.

This week we took in a full time tenant. He is a high level administrator (a VP) in a local hospital. And we are preparing a 2nd cottage to also have a tenant -- that with a friend of a friend already looking to live there.

What would we do if such was not available as an income source? How are you folks coping with such things?

I'd prefer to stay positive here. Changes we can make if and as such are required.

So... what about you? Are you sensing a storm? Are you already getting the hatches closed? And if so, how? What are you personally doing or planning to do if needed?

-don
 

dbrian66

Dr. Squier
Jul 14, 2017
9,741
Maryland, USA
So far, the only effect my family has felt is the cost of everything. Fortunately we have worked very hard to put ourselves in a very comfortable position financially. We have been able to absorb the extra cost so far without having to give anything up.

Every so often we can’t find certain food items, but that is a rarity.

My hope and prayers are that this won’t last too long. If it does, we will adapt and move forward!
 

grizzlewulf

Squier-holic
Dec 11, 2020
3,127
Lucerne, California
Things in the grocery stores around me have been pretty normal, except for the Great TP Run of 2020. Aside from that, supplies seem fine; maybe that's because I live in California where a lot of these foods are produced?

Of course things are expensive.

We've stocked up our pantry a bit, figure if we had to we could eat out of the pantry and regular groceries, that's last us 1-2 weeks. Then we've always got about a 2 week supply of emergency food and water in case of a disaster. That's not necessarily due to current times, that's just what folks should have on planet Earth because Earth can be mean sometimes.

Unfortunately we don't really have proper space to grow our own food, though I'd love to. Again, not a "current times" thing, just a good practice if you have the ability.

Economically it's a weird time in our lives as a family, we're kinda just subsisting while my wife goes to school and I do mostly stay at home dad duties supplemented by some part time work. Mostly we've lived off savings, but that can't continue much longer. And yes I'm feeling the pinch of increased costs for everything. A summer job may be in order here soon. My spouse should be done with school next year.

I dunno y'all. We live in times that will be an interesting chapter in history books, and that comes with uncertainty and discomfort. I dunno what's coming, if we're "through the worst of it" at least in terms of pandemic-related stressors to the economy and supplies, etc. Who can say. Then there's all the political hooplah and wars etc etc. Think of all the crazy intense events that have happened to societies throughout history; at the end of the day, someone's still gotta cook dinner, tidy the house, help the kids with their homework. Life is life.

I try to stay positive, be thankful for what I have. I try to see the good in people, and play a little guitar to soothe my nerves when I can spare a minute. That's about all I got really
 
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Slacker G

Squier-Meister
Sep 6, 2021
406
Iowa
It is working out great for me. Now I can carry out one $100 bag of groceries where I used to spend $100 and get two or three bags of groceries.

This makes it much easier on my back.

I can hardly wait until they start selling smaller packages as opposed selling us packages that are only 1/2 full of the product.
 

Luvs2yoko

Squier-holic
Jan 19, 2014
3,991
Pa
We are fortunate enough to be free of a mortgage and car payments for the first time in quite awhile. Trying to keep things as normal as possible for my daughters this summer. Two weeks at the beach, and as many day trips as we can do. Was going to replace the roof on our house, but will hold off till next year. My wife is a teacher and I can walk to work, so our gas usage is not too much of an issue. I do try and do all my shopping on Saturday to avoid multiple trips. My brother in law just got hired at our local golf course, so that means free golf. Might not seem like much,but I'll save between 20 and 50 dollars a week depending on how much we get out.
 

T-Rey

Squier-Meister
Nov 11, 2020
378
Georgia
As far as food, I have been buying in bulk when I find good deals on meat and vacuum sealing and freezing. I am fortunate to have a company truck that I drive home so gas has not been a hardship for me. As far as everything else, there's not much I can do about it. We suffered financially, as I'm sure many of you did, during the recession in 2008-10. I learned to be much more frugal during those times. I used to think I needed more to measure my success but now I know better. For me, less is way more peace of mind. The only exception that I make to that is guitars.
 

FrieAsABird

Squier-Meister
Jan 25, 2022
427
Germany
Here in central/ Western Europe, we have been noticing the food shortages caused by the war a lot. Sunflower oil, flour, and many other basic necessities are very hard to come by! Prices have also gone way up, but we have managed to live our lives normally. It’s always Important to realise how well we are off compared to many others. Very humbling to see what’s happening in the world and how much we take for granted. It makes me more and more grateful for what we have!
 

duceditor

Squier-Axpert
May 29, 2014
15,091
The Monadnocks, NH USA
It’s always Important to realise how well we are off compared to many others. Very humbling to see what’s happening in the world and how much we take for granted. It makes me more and more grateful for what we have!

Yes! That is the spirit we are trying to daily demonstrate.

When I think of even my own family, generations past, and the storms they've weathered, I realize that we have been most fortunate. Yes, we have had to "do without" to meet our own long-term goals, work multiple "jobs" as it were for extended periods, and such. But true deprivation we have never known.

What the future holds no one can say. But the trends are to my eyes heading towards some pretty challenging times. And as in the past for others such will require flexibility and ingenuity to weather.

-don
 

howserx

Squier-Nut
Apr 20, 2017
882
Toronto, Canada(not really)
The only thing I've noticed so far is Cereals. the shelves are often empty here, fine by me if I never buy another kelloggs product again. but my kids like cereal in the morning. I've tried stocking the pantry, but I gave up. No Space and what a I gonna put there. 20 cans of beans? I hate beans. lol. For me to do it properly I'd ahve to look at recipes I could make and stock accordingly. For now i just do a LIFO type of thing. I use a can of chickpeas, I buy another.... I HATE having to go to the store because I am missing one ingredient....

Gas is 1.73/L or just under $7/Gallon. I don't have to drive anywhere so that's fine. I think I drive about 5KM a week, just to the Grocery store and back. The rest of the time it's by Bicycle.
 

backporchmusic

Squier-Nut
Sep 6, 2014
900
Va
There have been shortages on some things here and there, but there is plenty to eat in our stores here. Not a big fan of Ravioli-Os, but I won't starve and haven't had to resort to that yet. I also find that one store may be out of something, but I can find it in another. When I have to wrestle someone to the ground over the last box of corn flakes I will begin to panic.

Definitely feeling the pinch when it comes time to pay for anything, so we've just been cutting back and trying to make our dollars go further and be used for more basic things.

But we have been conscious to not buy up more than our share. No hoarding or packing up for the zombie apocalypse. If we are all feeling this pinch and scarcity, then we are ALL feeling it. If we ALL don't buy up and hoard, then everyone will have some. But I suppose it only takes a few fear-ridden selfish types to empty out the Jimmy Dean section at the Kroger.
 

Powerstroke

Squier-holic
Feb 18, 2021
2,848
Usa
We see threads here -- quite appropriately! -- on how various of us are dealing with the crazy increases in the guitars we love -- and such things as shipping costs (and reliability). But what, I am wondering, are folks here doing about the changes in costs that may be effecting the other and larger parts of their lives.

This came to my mind when doing something totally mundane. My weekly food shopping.

I've read a good deal about the scarcity of goods -- food stuffs included -- in the national 'pipeline.' Things that the mass media only touch upon for the supposedly 'helpful' scare headlines such can help provide. More serious reading has predicted -- that by neccesity -- what is now apparently starting to happen. Something that for the first time was real and in my 'face' this morning when seemingly half of what was on my shopping list was simply unavailable. Produce. Meats. Dairy. Romaine lettuce for instance. English cucumbers. Eggs. Yogurt. And this ignoring what such has of late cost. No. It was simply unavailable.

Fuel? Heating oil? (5 dollars a gallon! ???)

Are you starting to see and feel the pinch of these things? How are you dealing with it?

The one thing Jan and I have decided is that we are going to flex as needed and not allow ourselves to have a 'woe is me' attitude.

If one food stuff is unavailable (as was so this morning again and again) then we will simply change how and what we eat to match was is available.

We, fortunately, have to drive little. (What are you who must drive a lot doing to cope?)

Our property -- that of our entire town -- was just a month or so ago re-evaluated as to it 'worth' -- that for taxes. It went up a 33%! That in one year.

This week we took in a full time tenant. He is a high level administrator (a VP) in a local hospital. And we are preparing a 2nd cottage to also have a tenant -- that with a friend of a friend already looking to live there.

What would we do if such was not available as an income source? How are you folks coping with such things?

I'd prefer to stay positive here. Changes we can make if and as such are required.

So... what about you? Are you sensing a storm? Are you already getting the hatches closed? And if so, how? What are you personally doing or planning to do if needed?

-don
We've been trying to grow our own food for the last few years. Really nothing to do with all this but solidified the idea for sure. We aren't driving anywhere really. We used to get out and go places. But not now. We stopped taking the older boy to grandma's each weekend because I can't afford the 100 plus dollars in fuel each week for him.
It is what it is. I can't do anything about it but talk about it. I'm happy to have a roof over my head honestly. I'm happy to have my family. Im happy to not be homeless or in a ghetto place.
I've been there. I know how to survive on nothing. Unfortunately the people who need to be humbled never get what they deserve.
By and large people just don't care about each other these days and it shows in our world. I wish it wasn't that way but again it is what it is.
To be more self-sufficient should be all our goals.
 

Jim Belaye

Squier-holic
Jul 25, 2015
3,192
Montréal, Canada
It's the same thing in Canada, at least where I live. Everything is more expensive, gas is at a record level. I try to buy everything on sale. I go to different stores.
Luckily, I have a lot of stores near my home. Also we're blessed that we're able to absorb the higher prices. I will not buy musical gear or big items in the short term.
As for the shortage of grocery products, it was much worse during the winter time. I went to the grocery store yesterday and the shelves were all full.
 

otma

Squier-holic
Nov 4, 2012
1,453
Owen, Wisconsin
I'm not really going to do much different. I'm not wealthy, unless compared to the many who are less well of than I am, but nor am I actually poor, or living paycheck to paycheck. I've essentially run out of gear to buy, except for a couple of things that I'm financing by selling things I already have. I'm more likely to cut down there than build up. Shortages have been short term, and stocking up when things can be had can help a lot, so economically, things have to get worse than what we're seeing now to be a game changer for me. There are things I worry about, but going broke in the foreseeable future isn't among them. I've been in worse pain than this before.
 

Loin Lover

Dr. Squier
Jul 26, 2018
6,422
Backwoods, USA
garden harvest May 9 2022.jpg

Our garden helps. We seldom buy red meat since I hunt. We eat fresh eggs almost daily.

The writing has been on the wall (in America) since Jan 2021. Fuel goes up, everything goes up. We keep a good stock of several foods including dry beans, flour, and rice. Poor man's stay alive food.

Any vice price naturally skyrockets, such as tobacco & booze. Glad I have not used one in several years and use the other seldom. Oh yeah, my vice, coffee, has gone up 50%. Stuff producers know we buy such as milk, bread, laundry detergent and cleaning products and any clothing item you name has gone up.

No guitar buying for me since I downsized a couple years ago. One I GASed for, but did not pull the trigger when I shoulda, is now stupid high--Squier Esquire in the white the first year they re-did them.
 

Las Palmas Norte

Squier-Axpert
Feb 19, 2017
10,250
Vancouver Island, Canada
The homeless crisis, rampant drug and alcohol abuse, teen violence, racial violence, drug overdose deaths, human smuggling, child pornography, road rage, money laundering, mental health, domestic violence, property theft, vandalism, hit and run drivers, gangs, shootings and stabbings, robbery, war in Ukraine, all has me thinking beyond inflation.
 

duceditor

Squier-Axpert
May 29, 2014
15,091
The Monadnocks, NH USA
The homeless crisis, rampant drug and alcohol abuse, teen violence, racial violence, drug overdose deaths, human smuggling, child pornography, road rage, money laundering, mental health, domestic violence, property theft, vandalism, hit and run drivers, gangs, shootings and stabbings, robbery, war in Ukraine, all has me thinking beyond inflation.

Yes. Understandably.

But apart from society as a whole reevaluating itself -- something greatly discouraged by all with control -- there is little beyond the (meaningful) one-on-one we can do about any of that.

(Well, at least that is y conclusion for and about myself.)

We can, though, control things closer t home. Our own preparation for whatever may come. And maybe not just for ourselves -- but in smaller, more controllable, self-made communities.

Many of the people I most look up to are thinking and acting that way.

And as odd as it may sound to some, that is a key reason Jan and I live as and where we do. What is a harsh Winter in comparison to a warm community. Or a measure of self-sufficiency?

-don
 

grizzlewulf

Squier-holic
Dec 11, 2020
3,127
Lucerne, California
If I was to try and dispense advice about things like this (and maybe I shouldn't, I'm just a guy, I don't know nothing) I'd say this: Don't stop making plans and goals.

Keep striving for that promotion. Plan that vacation. Mark that fun family event in your calendar. Hell, keep shopping for guitars, even if you have to adjust your budget and save up for a while, whereas in better times you might just splurge. Keep writing songs for your someday band, whatever it is that keeps you going.

It's important we don't get so bogged down with the weight of potential disasters that we lose reason to look forward to tomorrow. You can prepare for survival, but if you've nothing to look forward to, why bother.
 
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