tuning up for bow season

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by Loin Lover, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    Two months after clearing the first trees and brush, raking, weed killing, rock picking, tilling, fertilizing, planting, fence building, and running irrigation I have sprouts at my new 'Dead Oak Plot'! Where is the easy button?

    If I can keep big critters out for a couple months I hope to remove the fence and hunt over it early-mid October.



    dead oak plot right sprouting 8 25 2020.jpg
     
  2. vinbur

    vinbur Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    Sep 30, 2017
    nebraska
    You've been a busy boy! Gonna feel extra satisfied, when your dragging one out of there!
     
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  3. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    It is not all play and no work. We have chosen to process our own meat for 35 years. The best known local butcher shop does not guarantee the deer you take them will be the meat you receive. No thank you.

    Being the ultimate optometrist (sic) I anticipate another opening day success this Saturday. (Hmmm, I think I wiffed last opening day?) Gotta make some freezer space, thawing 30 pounds to grind. Lotsa work, but well worth it.

    We make jerky from our ground deer. It can be as thick or thin as we choose. It is much easier to eat and savor flavors compared to yanking dentures out while battling tiny sinew. Also, the $5 / pound ground beef in stores has progressively become more nasty over the years IMO. Our ground is great for all cooking such as spaghetti.

    I hope so @vinbur . It is growing well and glowing through the woods. Here are 100 yard, 40 yard, and underneath the stand pics this morn. I still have to finish boxing in and camouflaging the stand. I may be tempted to remove the fence earlier than planned!
    Do you have early season plans to chase those quarter horse size corn huskin' deer?
     

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    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
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  4. vinbur

    vinbur Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    Sep 30, 2017
    nebraska
    I don't generally get to excited about early season. We just finally broke free from about 3 weeks of 90 plus temps. Our season starts tomorrow, I do have a couple of stands that I like to sit and observe from though. Supposed to be a couple of days with highs in the sixties next week. Might get out just because I can. On the subject of processing your own deer. I've never known another way. We raised hogs when I was a kid. We processed probably 25 or 30 of them on average every year. Deer seem pretty easy comparably. My dad has all sorts of grinders, saws and stuffers. I still can't make as good of summer sausage as him, but I'm getting close!
     
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  5. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    SSSSS meme.jpg

    Skeeter Swattin' Season Starts Saturday.
    It is actually supposed to be in the 50s Saturday morning. Although it won't keep the skeeters under covers I'll take it.

    I ventured to my new plot, planted Aug 18th, then around to a micro plot (175 square feet in the middle of thick woods with nearly zero direct sunlight) near an old stand site. Three days ago I raked leaves away and scattered seed. If this stuff tastes good to deer it is truly amazing.
    This little spot is called the Farrel plot. He was a mentor of mine, died the day I first made the plot a couple years ago. I literally asked myself "what would Farrel do?" when deciding whether or not to remove a young tree shortly before getting a call from his son. :-/
     

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  6. vinbur

    vinbur Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    Sep 30, 2017
    nebraska
    First sit of the season. High of 48 today. Sure feels like it could be November. IMG_20200909_160606551.jpg
     
  7. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    I wasn't going to wish you luck while still on your stand. Then I see you have a nice loaded PG for sale. You're playing with your twitterphone while in your stand! Gotta love it.
    About five years ago I started taking my Kindle with me. It is more quiet than turning pages. I have a routine of reading a page, scan, repeat.
    I do not use my cell phone for internet. I see folks "twittering" non stop. As much as I enjoy researching and reading online, I would be worse than youngins.
    I had two nanny does and their babies all around my stand this morning, more than two hours. There was a 40 minute span where they were within 20 yards. It was good discipline practice not moving, not spooking them. I kept hoping they would be the greatest decoy possible, yet they were a pain in the arse for over two hours. On the bright side, I learn so much about them and practice seeing how they blend/disappear once taking my eye off them.
    Yes I had my Kindle, Vince Flynn's "The Last Man".
    I've heard of folks reading, knitting or crocheting, and doing crossword puzzles. What, if anything, does everyone do while sitting for hours?
    Bambi 9 9 2020.jpg
     
  8. Bob the builder

    Bob the builder Squier-Meister

    Age:
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    Feb 25, 2017
    Rhode Island USA
    Anisette always worked for me
     
  9. vinbur

    vinbur Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    Sep 30, 2017
    nebraska
    haha, ya, didn't figure I'd have much action until the last hour or so of light. Didn't end up having much then either. All I had in range was 4 turkeys and a raccoon.
     
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  10. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    Holy cow! Good for her.
    I hope she told reporters "Yep, using my XYZ .30-06 and ZYX 180 grain bulligans, while wearing ABC camo and CBA lingerie, sitting in a DEF blind on a FED chair, I got him in a food plot of FGH brassicas and HGF clover. It's 8:30, I'm late for skool."
     
  11. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    I can't get my head in the game this early in the season, but for me, the best deer stand around would be my front or back porch. There is a group of five does and this year four fawns that are often within 15 yards of one or the other at some point in the day. The old doe doesn't have fawns anymore, and I would guess about 180.
    When hunting time comes, I will climb into a stand out in the woods where there are a lot fewer deer, but "hunting" is more than just the game or harvest.
    I wish I had a place to put in a turnip patch, but not here at the house. Not for the deer as much as for me!
    If you are putting in food plots in Missouri for the hunting season, you want a bag of Bob Oats, a winter oat. Royal Purple Winter Oats is another if i remember the name correctly. If you have 20 acres, the deer will still keep it cut like you mowed it, and in the spring, the turkeys will walk it down and live in it till the oats are gone.
    One of the best parts of using oats is, you can simply over seed existing pasture or grassy areas, and the deer will return to those spots for years.
    25 years of helping manage large chunks of land for game months out of the year, and I have used all of the various food plot seeds, along with spreader buggies of whatever we had mixed that season. Alfalfa, white clovers and field peas make the best spring browse, and in the hunting season, winter oats rules. The clovers are not reliably hardy, the field peas are a specific time period food, and alfalfa has to be sprayed or the weevils will kill it all quicker than you will believe. Oats works better than any of them.
    If you own the property, plant persimmons high on the sunny side of the hills/ridges, so over the years, they spread downhill. At some point n the season, deer are going to invade the persimmon patch and unlike a lot of other foods, the bucks will hit them harder than the does. Honey locust seed pods are another buck draw in the hunting season.
     
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  12. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    I had to get my dictionary out for that word. Hiccup.

    Thanks for the info. The plot I built this summer has an annual mix of brassicas, rye, and clover. Planted on Aug 18th, it is thick and lush. It will be interesting to see how the deer like it, and if so, how long it takes to mow it down.

    dead oak plot close up 9 14 2020.jpg

    I have considered planting white ladino clover as a perennial this spring. It is very shade tolerant, which I need. How do the oats tolerate limited sun?
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2020 at 11:52 AM
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  13. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    My father took his boss hunting, and they stayed with an old time farm family. He decided he wanted a place of his own, and purchased 1500 acres. His son purchased 180 elsewhere with a 50 acre lake.
    I literally had a bed, three tractors, a huge old loader, a road grader, bailing equipment and four ATV's. They would work all week,and then run to the farm for two days to play with big boy's toys. Then my father had to retire, and started spending four days a week minimum at the farm. I was often with him.
    When I was hunting the 185 acres, I walked to the boat, used a trolling motor to cross to my stand, and then caught crappie for dinner on my way back to the house!
    We ran through all sorts of seed/foodplots. Winter wheat, Alfalfa, field peas, several different clovers, rye, milo, corn, specialty mixes and winter oats. For twenty plus years.
    If you plant field peas early in an area with lots of deer, even a five acre patch, you will never get a single pea pod off of them. They browse the tips and then as the pods start, they browse the bloom tips off. I was never able to collect even enough for one meal.
    We had a persimmon patch about an acre in size that expanded downhill anywhere you did not mow. Some years they hit them early. Some years they would all be on the ground frozen when they hit them. They always had a time period when they were hot, and the bucks were always there with the does sooner or later.
    We went to one of the big buck specials at one of the big outdoor sports stores, and as we talked to people and examined their products, "bob oats" was a common ingredient, and they were getting crazy prices for the mixes. We had tried oats before over seeded on pasture, and we knew the deer continued to return to that spot a couple of years later. We ordered in 200 pounds of bob oat seed from an outlet in Stuttgart Arkansas for less than ten pounds of the mixes, and we planted a large plot that was 270 yards long.
    The turkeys and deer spent large chunks of time in them from the beginning. In the spring, after they made, we either mowed them down or watched as the turkeys would use their chest to walk down the standing plants, picking them clean as they held them down. The does lived in it it seemed, and the bucks hit it too.
    In all of the years the place was managed for game, we never found anything that would consistently draw deer or turkey like winter oats except alfalfa, but on the second or third year, the weevils found the alfalfa and simply killed it. We did not want to spray a crop that the deer stood in for hours a day, so there was no way to continue from that point. It would get so high, and the weevils would kill it. The oats had no problems at all. We never planted a patch that deer did not hammer.
    Later, we switched to Royal something winter oats, since they were easier to get.
    Best spot attractant was ground boiled acorns cast into a green apple sugary hard candy. We put hangers into the mix and let them harden. When you hung them, the deer did not really mess with them, but the big suckers drew moisture to them and there was always another drip getting ready to fall under them as they actually melted in the humidity.
    The deer would eat everything that those drops landed on, including the dirt.
    Green apple licorice pieces will also get deer to walk over and at least sniff a small pile of them, and the candy outlets along the highway sell good sized bags of bits and pieces for a couple of bucks.
    I don't kill much of anything these days, and I cannot draw a real bow anymore, but for most of my life, the first of October was the major yearly holiday! I would be in a stand somewhere with my bow, even if it fell on Tuesday.
     
  14. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    The oats like more sun than clover, but they still grew well to the edges where they were more shaded. We were putting in large plots, so sun exposure was never a question. I was prepping plots with a 12 foot disk behind a Massey Ferguson. Some of them exceeded ten acres and were hundreds of yards long.
    The best clover plots were always along the creeks where they got shaded part of the day and the ground had good moisture all the time. We had better luck overseeding "Cow Lover's Clover Mix" over fields and pastures than we had with Ladino.
     
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  15. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    After re-reading your post it reinforces my view on being a professional ABC ZYX .... professional anything, you name it. Mixing a passion with a job can become volatile. I am not sure how to verbalize it, conflicting conflicts?

    Although I was very far from being a professional, once I started fishing local bass tournaments fishing stopped being as fun. Hmmm, the added pressure of paying an entry fee equal to two days of work and needing to perform for the boat owning partner equaled poor performance. I was not pro material, I was not having as much fun, I was not catching as many fish.

    That was in the mid '80s. I have had hundreds of pleasurable fishing experiences since, thank goodness. Passions are funny and have changed azimuths through life.
     
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  16. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer Dr. Squier

    Age:
    58
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    I guess at some point most things eventually get boring to us. Sadly I have lost the love for my guitars. I just no desire to pick them up and play them and and cant remember when I last ordered any parts for them.
     
  17. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    Sorry to hear that John. I have found myself playing a little more since I began downsizing last year. I'll be optimistic your musical mojo returns at your pace and need. Also, hope you / y'all out west get some fresh air soon.

    Several posts earlier I mentioned selling a Hoyt bow and tree stand. I won't try to describe nor diagnose it, but I lost desire to hunt for a couple years. Then I got my desire back. Thankfully.

    As much as I enjoy hunting now I know my mentality would be totally different if I were on a pro staff or attempting to make a video. I am content without unnecessary stressors in life.
     
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  18. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer Dr. Squier

    Age:
    58
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    Thanks bud..
    We actually got a breath of fresh air today, the wind came up early this morning and blew most of the smoke out. It's actually blue skies out there right now...:)
     
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  19. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    The big doe was resting behind my daughter's car, maybe 25 yards from the front door this morning. I stepped out, but with her down and not moving, did not immediately spot her. A squirrel started across the road and then went back, and as I looked away from the squirrel, I realized why it had changed course! She watched me until I went back inside, and then later let my wife step out and look at her before heading off into the woods.
    Sounds weird, but I will pack up and go someplace where there are fewer deer for hunting season, since here it would just be an exercise in harvesting, much like harvesting a farm animal, and we have been watching most of the deer we see since they were born and started moving around.
     
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