tuning up for bow season

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by Loin Lover, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. vinbur

    vinbur Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    729
    Sep 30, 2017
    nebraska
    Enjoyed this post! I've gotten to the point in my life, where the experience has become more important than the outcome. Used to put a ton of pressure on myself, trying to meet the expectations of others mostly. Deer hunting and music are my main interests. It would be cool if word spread as quickly when you come up with a cool guitar lick as it does when you shoot a good buck. I was fortunate enough to kill a freak 23 point buck yrs. ago that kinda turned me into a local celebrity. Of course, some pressure came along with that. Not only from the expectations of others, but also in wanting to feel that kind of excitement again myself. On the plus side, i became a much better hunter. On the negative, the pressure. I suppose it has been age and experience that have caused the pressure to dwindle. I still look forward to fall, and on occasion have the chance to harvest a nice deer. But have gone several seasons without filling a tag, and have had zero regrets. The highlights now days are watching nature, and spending time alone. Taking a deer is icing on the cake.
     
    speelyei and Loin Lover like this.
  2. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    With the weather, we might all be better off if we put up a big tent out in the national forest with a wood stove in the corner, and then played with guitars for a week!
    I may actually go sit a stand tomorrow morning. If the rain ever stops anyway.
     
    speelyei and vinbur like this.
  3. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer ^^ Doing what I do best^^ Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    I don't hunt with archery equipment anymore and any big game with firearms either for that matter but the wife and I absolutely love to load up the ATVs and hunt for grouse. I don't really care if I harvest any or not but just being up there in the mountains is good enough for me..
     
  4. vinbur

    vinbur Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    729
    Sep 30, 2017
    nebraska
    That sounds like a good time to me!! The one thing i do miss about my rifle hunting days, is the opening day excitement. Though we never had a "deer camp" we would all get together the night before and discuss our strategy etc. Then usually meet back at my parents house midday for lunch. Bow hunting, is a much more solo endeavor on pretty much every level.
     
    Ahnlaashock likes this.
  5. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    I was privileged to have "deer camp" most of my life. Mostly on private ground. Some next to national forest or conservation ground.
    For the men in the family, deer season was the most important event all year long. One of my father's friends once told his daughter when she was planning her wedding, not to schedule it it during October or during firearms deer season if she wanted him there.
    I was also blessed for about twenty years with 365/24 access and involvement in a large property managed for game.
    I was tracker/game processor/help when I wasn't hunting myself.
    Then we got our own place until a few years later when Dad died there. Now, my father died surrounded by his children, grandchildren, and his son in law, in his sleep, in deer camp where he wanted to be. I am not sure it gets better than that. Suddenly all of the women resented the place. The grandson's would not return since he died there.
    Mom sold the family hunting spot a few years later and now I head out alone usually.
    I set camp and enjoyed the time out in the woods the last few years without serious hunting, since I could not see very well. I did not know how blind I was until they fixed my eyes! Now I can even use open sights again.
    I have a Suburban and a 20 by 40 rain tarp. Making camp simply isn't all that hard. Hang tarp, open hatch, drag ground mat out, inflate mattress and set up the butane stove. I will go out for a few days again this year, but the big Boy Scout tent with a dozen guys scrambling to get dressed in the cold or telling stories in the evening, doesn't happen anymore.
    If I ever win the lottery, that will be the first purchase. A nice piece of hunting ground. I have grandsons.
    A camp and guitars can happen any time of year. I used to take my Standard and a Honeytone with me. The standard was loud enough unplugged to play in a tent or alone by the fire, and if you want to practice power chords, the Honeytone works pretty well also.
    The national forest is free, and there are multiple campgrounds. We can do that whenever we actually decide to do so, except firearms deer season. Those seriously hunting would be offended.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2020
    speelyei likes this.
  6. speelyei

    speelyei Squier-Meister

    Age:
    48
    243
    Sep 22, 2020
    Mesa, AZ
    20C3A703-BFA8-41BB-95FF-AB3B22F26DF4.jpeg Any of you bow hunters interested in recurves? I’ve got a Bear Kodiak Magnum and a Bear Kodiak Hunter, I’d be happy to trade for a bass, tele, or?
     
  7. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    Being out there watching is worth it all by itself a lot of the time.
    I have seen black squirrels. Grays of various shades and sizes. Red squirrels, brassy colored squirrels and even one white squirrel.
    This morning I just watched a leaf brown squirrel, at less than ten yards with 10x50 binoculars. Let it stop in the leaves covering the forest floor, look away, and when I looked back, I would not pick him out till he moved or his tail gave him away. He blends in perfectly.
     
    speelyei likes this.
  8. speelyei

    speelyei Squier-Meister

    Age:
    48
    243
    Sep 22, 2020
    Mesa, AZ
    I always apply for draw tags in Wilderness areas here in AZ. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a rifle or bow hunt. There are usually more tags than applicants for Wilderness areas so I am pretty confident I’ll get drawn and can plan accordingly. People don’t like these areas because they are closed to all vehicles and conveyances like bicycles, but that’s exactly why I like them. I don’t often have more than two or three days to hunt, so I just treat it like a three day solo backpacking trip, with a rifle or bow.
    I almost always come home empty handed, but fully satisfied.
    I’ve found pictographs, petroglyphs, fossils, wrecked planes, abandoned homesteads, caves, and seen lots and lots of critters.

    I am fortunate that I have always lived (as an adult) in western states with very high percentages of public access land. I don’t know what I would do in a place like Texas or Oklahoma where everything is private, and posted.
     
    vinbur and Ahnlaashock like this.
  9. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    For those moon / tide believers, tomorrow is the blue moon. Max critter activity in the early afternoon in my neck of the woods. With the rut starting there is no telling what activity one might see. I have pics of a really nice 10 with stickers / kickers. Maybe his daddy may get hungry? Who knows, that's why we go.

    I've got two fresh does in the freezer. Well, much of the last one is now in dehydrators. No matter, I can actually hunt with no pressure and be very particular. We can only check one buck so I do not want to use that tag on a yearling spike. Oh yeah, I crossbow hunt so it's also a game of patience.

    I've got a few pics of deer in my new food plot, but they are not tearing it up. I may have waited too long to remove the fence, not sure. No matter, I've got a comfortable reading stand at my disposal and those critters gotta eat some time.
     

    Attached Files:

    Ahnlaashock and speelyei like this.
  10. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    Give it a few days on your plot. A few good frosts and they will be more interested.
    I went out yesterday and hunted till dark since the wind was reasonable. I saw no deer, but my grands, daughter and wife watched five out in the yard at the house eating acorns.
     
    Loin Lover likes this.
  11. squierTony

    squierTony Dr. Squier

    Age:
    47
    Jul 4, 2012
    MAUD Oklahoma
    My muzzle loader buck. Oct 30th 2020. Oklahoma public land deer. 61DCFC54-78CD-43AD-943C-C4719E9FF247.jpeg 3C7739F5-6C3C-42D4-B6A5-5F1DA708EC63.jpeg
     
  12. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    strat_strummer likes this.
  13. speelyei

    speelyei Squier-Meister

    Age:
    48
    243
    Sep 22, 2020
    Mesa, AZ
    A cool morning in Mohave County, AZ
    10903870_579008682232282_4515436891199934549_o_579008682232282.jpg
     
    squierTony and Loin Lover like this.
  14. speelyei

    speelyei Squier-Meister

    Age:
    48
    243
    Sep 22, 2020
    Mesa, AZ
    Same day, after gaining some elevation.
    10861023_579008082232342_4393980830151153513_o_579008082232342.jpg
     
  15. squierTony

    squierTony Dr. Squier

    Age:
    47
    Jul 4, 2012
    MAUD Oklahoma
    That’s some real work with that recurve. Spot and stalk isn’t easy.
     
    speelyei likes this.
  16. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer ^^ Doing what I do best^^ Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
  17. squierTony

    squierTony Dr. Squier

    Age:
    47
    Jul 4, 2012
    MAUD Oklahoma
    Thanks.
     
  18. speelyei

    speelyei Squier-Meister

    Age:
    48
    243
    Sep 22, 2020
    Mesa, AZ
    I suppose if I ever saw a deer it would be a real challenge
     
    squierTony likes this.
  19. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer ^^ Doing what I do best^^ Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    I can't do it anymore but you guys posting your hunting trips is really bringing back the memories. Keep it up...:)
     
    Loin Lover and speelyei like this.
  20. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    I have been planning my recent hunting times according to the gorgeous full moon we've had in addition to weather in addition to happy wife happy life. The forecast called for 30 MPH winds Sunday afternoon, so I wanted my morning hunt to be memorable. It would be my last for a little while. I have another visit with my orthopedic friends at the VA in the morning. Anyway, back to more pleasurable thoughts, my morning hunt.

    I slowly slipped through the woods more than a half hour before shooting light. The setting full moon more than illuminated my way. Arriving at my "Dead Oak Plot" stand I set up a 3D archery target deer, Bucky, about 20 yards away at the left edge of the plot. I had set it up at another stand location in early season without horns. Does and fawns saw it, fed and milled around as usual from about 15 yards away. Today was the first time using a buck decoy.

    I saw three young bucks, spike, fork horned, and little six point. Moral of the story: Do not use a decoy with big horns if you want a close-up shot at young bucks. I watched the 6 stop in his tracks once he saw Bucky. He was about 50 yards, too far if I wanted a shot. I didn't. He postured, bristled, and did that sideways head down ears back submissive walk away. He never came within 20 yards of Bucky as he circled, then vaporized in the brush.

    Later the fork which slowly walked by earlier came back. He was in a thicket left of the plot (so Bucky was on that side) and eventually made his way to the side of the plot. This entire time I presumed he knew Bucky was there, both from the earlier drive by and now, walking directly at him. Well, evidently he had not seen Bucky. He may have wet himself a little when he stumbled mid step once he saw Bucky. I was smiling the entire time watching all this.

    Fork piddled around just across a brush pile from Bucky and could not figure out why there was no movement. After a good five minutes he slowly walked away. The brush and shadows create a literal Field of Dreams cornfield as you can see a deer one second and they vanish their next step. Just before he vanished I softly blew a grunt tube twice. The first stopped him, the second brought him straight back to Bucky. Well, straight back with the brush pile separation.

    Wash, rinse, repeat. He walked away, I brought him back. It was the first time I can swear a grunt tube has worked for me. I was loving it. But the wind was beginning to pick up sooner than forecast, and the dreaded swirl. I hoped his and the others' scent might bring their granddaddy. No such luck. I packed my stuff after they were all out of sight for several minutes. I do not want to mess this stand up.

    All the while watching these deer I never raised my crossbow. I just watched their behavior and watched behind them. I was remembering the toil, sweat, and backache which went into building the food plot and six feet wide Cadillac of tree stands. I thanked God. I wished my sons or grandkids could have been sitting with me. I was grateful for the opportunity to own a tiny piece of (my) heaven on earth and the resources to make the most of it.

    After climbing down I recovered Bucky and changed the SD card in the trail cam. Holy cow! I have never seen this fella before. He was there about an hour before I got there. Wowsa! I'd be the once peeing if I got a bow shot opportunity at him. :) Maybe some day, maybe not.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 1, 2020
    squierTony likes this.