Thinking it through (table routing)

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by jamesgpobog, Aug 8, 2020.

  1. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Never done it. Have had a table for a while, but not the guts to try.

    Bough a 2 horse router at Harbor Freight today so I don't have to keep swapping it out.

    I've had a hard time getting my head around routing bodies this way, but I think I've got it. First pass, template on bottom, short straight bit, shank bearing.

    Second pass, 1" straight bit, shank bearing, riding on first cut.

    Third pass, flip work (template on top), flush trim bit (end bearing), raised enough to ride on second cut.

    Do I have it right?
     
  2. guitalias

    guitalias Squier-Meister

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    Sounds correct. Keep in mind router spins same way, but upside down, so spins counterclockwise relative to your point of view.

    How are you going to rout the pickup/control routing? Perhaps you can answer a question I've had in my mind. I haven't been able to figure out how this would be done on a table router.
     
  3. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    I do it with a hand router. Obviously I am far from being expert, but I think doing cavities on a table, blind and upside down is a pretty bad idea.By hand, you have one face open, the top, where the router enters. You can see. On a table, that is covered...by the table. 100% blind. To me that is terrifying. Also, on a table, the work is floating. Routing by hand, the work is clamped.The important thing to routing cavities is (IMHO), ti drill them out with Forstner bits firs, removing as much wood as you can. I set the depth on the drill press somewhere between 1/4 and 1/8 shallow, and let the router finish the floor of the cavity.
     
  4. Wizzer

    Wizzer Squier-holic

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    With a 1" straight bit, you only have to do two passes since most bodies are 1 3/4" thick. Template on the bottom, one pass. Take the template off, use the cut you just made as a template, do a second pass. I draw a line on the body with a pencil that's about 1/8" outside the template, then cut on that line with a bandsaw. Then I'll run it around a spindle sander a bit if needed, then I route. Ideally, the router should take only 1/16" off for the best result. A shear bit(aka spiral bit) works best because it slices, essentially, and you're less likely to tear out.
     
  5. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Yeah, I'm hip to the bandsaw/sander thing. I was worried that a full length 1" cut might be too much. On the other hand, it is a 28,000 rpm 2 horse router...

    Up cut or down cut spiral, and what do you do for a bearing?
     
  6. guitalias

    guitalias Squier-Meister

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    What my thoughts were also.
     
  7. guitalias

    guitalias Squier-Meister

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    Your original method keeps the template on for later pickup/control routing, assuming you have a single template like I've been doing. If separate templates, either way ok.
     
  8. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    My template set is 2 piece, but I guess that is mostly for the neck and through-body holes.
     
  9. guitalias

    guitalias Squier-Meister

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    My current body project is routed from the front with a pickguard a la Mustang. If I do a later version I'm thinking of rear routing a la Les Paul.
     
  10. Wizzer

    Wizzer Squier-holic

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    I've got an upcut spiral bit with a bottom bearing. I've had it so long I can't even remember where I picked it up. A friend of mine has these triple-wing bits and they work really, really well. The shank is a 1/2" though, and I'm guessing your Harbor Freight router takes 1/4" bits.

    https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/triplewing.html
     
  11. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Actually, the HF router ("Drill Master") has collets for 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2. It's also 2 horse, 28000 rpm. Under $60.
     
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  12. Wizzer

    Wizzer Squier-holic

    Age:
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    Oh, that's awesome. In that case, I'd order the 1/2" collet bit that cuts 1" in length. Pretty inexpensive bits for how good of a job they do. And if you're only routing about 1/16" to 1/8" off, it'll be a piece of cake.
     
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