Stand Alone Keyboard

OOMTOM

Squier-holic
Jun 19, 2021
1,434
Johannesburg South Africa
Sorry if this is in the wrong forum.
I am interested in a Stand alone Keyboard and frankly I am confused. I see words like Midi etc. I don't want it anyway linked to the Internet or anything else. And no a Grand Piano is not going to do the job either.
The info I have gathered so far is 61 keys minimum. Can you point me in the right direction.
Much appreciated - Tom
 

miket1117

Squier-holic
Gold Supporting Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,747
Kansas City
I'd make sure the power adapter is included... some don't include, crazy as that sounds. also, you will want a jack for headphones and a line out so you can plug into an amp. the on-board speakers are okay, but sometimes you want more volume, better output, esp if recording.

i had a Yamaha similar to the one linked above (but one of PSR models) and kept it for almost 20 years... served me well. at the time, it was a$200 unit... the PSR line are more now, but i basically wanted for nothing.

def agree with 61 keys minimum. i just got a new 88-key Casio and it's almost too many for me.

i can also say, by way of comparison, i like Yamaha display and layout of the function buttons better than the Casio.

you can def spend alot on these things, but $180 - $250 should get you something perfectly functional, with a lot of features and sounds.

fwiw... within that price range, i'd stay with either Casio or Yamaha... they've been building these a long time. for me, i'm just more comfortable staying with the big brand names.

good luck!
 

dbrian66

Dr. Squier
Jul 14, 2017
9,870
Maryland, USA
Another feature that I would definitely recommend is weighted keys. Makes it feel more like a piano and easier to to control the volume of the note.

As long as it has internal speakers, it should be fine. Just because it has a MIDI out doesn’t mean you have to use it that way.

Like most things, you will get what you pay for. If you go super cheap you will probably be disappointed.
 

fadetoz

Dr. Squier
Jun 29, 2011
6,152
USA
Most of them have MIDI as an option. Weighted keys like dbrian66 said is a good thing and don't forget the sustain pedal.
My daughter started on a cheaper keyboard but after a few years of playing and lessons she really didn't like not having a sustain pedal.
I got her a Hamilton Baldwin studio piano and she never used that keyboard again.
 

miket1117

Squier-holic
Gold Supporting Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,747
Kansas City
Another feature that I would definitely recommend is weighted keys. Makes it feel more like a piano and easier to to control the volume of the note.

As long as it has internal speakers, it should be fine. Just because it has a MIDI out doesn’t mean you have to use it that way.

Like most things, you will get what you pay for. If you go super cheap you will probably be disappointed.
dunno... my Yamaha didnt have weighted keys but did have the touch-sensitive feature whereby the harder you hit it, the louder the sound. my hands could fly across the keys.

the new Casio has the weighted keys and has been a big adjustment, requiring a bit more strength and precision. if you're coming from a traditional piano, might feel normal, but so far, im not really a fan. i need to dig into the manual and see if i can adjust the sensitivity... lighten'em up some.

sustain pedal is nice, but the price goes up for units with that feature. in 20 years with the Yamaha, i maybe missed having a sustain a handful of times. the Casio has one, but i havent even plugged it in yet.
 

brians

Squier-holic
Oct 1, 2017
2,200
South Africa
The thing here is one can mostly make an inexpensive guitar play great, but a cheapo keyboard is just a cheap keyboard and they mostly suck.
So a good one is an expensive one, unfortunately.
 


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