Squire Les Paul Opinions?

BobbyMac

Squier-Meister
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 10, 2021
121
Texas Panhandle
The Series 24 guitars from Squier was a brief line offered more than 15 years ago. When Fender's DeArmond brand died (all of which were based on older Guild models), Squier picked up many of those designs for the Series 24. Unfortunately, the Series 24 models could not compare to the DeArmonds and the Series 24 did not last very long.

The model you think looks like a Les Paul, is actually based on the Guild Bluesbird. The similar DeArmond model, also based on the Guild Bluesbird, was known as the M-75.
 

duceditor

Squier-Axpert
May 29, 2014
15,861
The Monadnocks, NH USA
Smallish, rounded, body shape. Stop bar and ‘adjustamatic’ type bridge. PUPS and controls of the type most commonly seen on a Gibbie. I think the OP was, while not technically correct to a knowledgeable ‘expert,’ nonetheless basically right. By Squier standards these could be described as Les Paul type guitars. Not at all what one would expect to bear the Squier moniker.

-don
 

HSH Classic Vibe

Squier-Meister
May 28, 2022
324
Republic of Squierland
The Series 24 guitars from Squier was a brief line offered more than 15 years ago. When Fender's DeArmond brand died (all of which were based on older Guild models), Squier picked up many of those designs for the Series 24. Unfortunately, the Series 24 models could not compare to the DeArmonds and the Series 24 did not last very long.

The model you think looks like a Les Paul, is actually based on the Guild Bluesbird. The similar DeArmond model, also based on the Guild Bluesbird, was known as the M-75.
This is pretty much it, except that "Squier" doesn't exist as a company as hasn't since Fender absorbed the Squier string company in the mid-60s. It's just a brand name Fender uses for making import guitars. Similarly, DeArmond went out of business and Fender bought the rights to the name, and had already purchased Guild. They started making "DeArmond" guitars in Korea and Indonesia as budget versions of the Guilds -- the Koreans being better built and better spec'd. In 2005 the DeArmonds name was finally dropped by Fender for guitars and pickups, and the same guitars were rebranded "Squiers" and were made in the SAME factories as the DeArmonds and thus were the same quality albeit with different pickups (Seymour Duncan Design from Korea rather than the faux DeArmonds Fender was having made). Those Squiers are not inferior to the so-called Fender DeArmonds.
 

BobbyMac

Squier-Meister
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 10, 2021
121
Texas Panhandle
Its OK to have differing opinions concerning the Series 24 guitars and those put out under the DeArmond name. In my opinion, the Series 24 guitars were a step down from the DeArmonds. As I said, it is OK to think otherwise.
 

miket1117

Squier-holic
Gold Supporting Member
Mar 31, 2018
3,177
Kansas City
i've got an M70 in the Moon Blue and find it to be a nice guitar. i like it well enough, but if i'm going to play an "LP" type, i'm more likely to pick up my Epi LP. pickups are much better. (sorry i cant get more specific... been more than a year since i last played the M70.)
 

BobbyMac

Squier-Meister
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 10, 2021
121
Texas Panhandle
I like the DeArmonds very much, though I've sold them all. Had ten of them at one point, 9 guitars and one 5-string bass. Most of them were purchased during the DeArmond "blow out" when the line had been discontinued and most vendors were selling them at ridiculously low prices. I think my favorites among them were my T-400 and my Starfire, followed by my X-145, Starfire Special, and the M-75T and M-77T.
 

Toddcaster64

Squier-holic
Gold Supporting Member
Apr 1, 2013
1,711
Ventura
The older DeArmomds (case in point my M75) came with gold foil pickups as opposed to the traditional humbuckers, not to mention a harp type tailpiece (no stop bar). Tone was completely different from a Les Paul. Size was also such that you would never mistake it for a Les Paul. Looked more like a holllow body with the f holes filled.
 

drewcp

Dr. Squier
Staff member
Dec 14, 2018
7,415
Saint Paul, MN
The older DeArmomds (case in point my M75) came with gold foil pickups as opposed to the traditional humbuckers, not to mention a harp type tailpiece (no stop bar). Tone was completely different from a Les Paul. Size was also such that you would never mistake it for a Les Paul. Looked more like a holllow body with the f holes filled.

They were called gold tone pickups which are not gold foils.
 
Last edited:

BobbyMac

Squier-Meister
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 10, 2021
121
Texas Panhandle
They are not gold foils.
That is correct, the product literature of the time called them DeArmond GoldTone humbucker pickups.

These were very nice pickups, as were the DeArmond 2k pups, which are also referred to as Dynasonic pickups (Gretsch and Guild use that name currently).
 

DJGranite

Squier-holic
Feb 7, 2012
2,261
maine
This is pretty much it, except that "Squier" doesn't exist as a company as hasn't since Fender absorbed the Squier string company in the mid-60s. It's just a brand name Fender uses for making import guitars. Similarly, DeArmond went out of business and Fender bought the rights to the name, and had already purchased Guild. They started making "DeArmond" guitars in Korea and Indonesia as budget versions of the Guilds -- the Koreans being better built and better spec'd. In 2005 the DeArmonds name was finally dropped by Fender for guitars and pickups, and the same guitars were rebranded "Squiers" and were made in the SAME factories as the DeArmonds and thus were the same quality albeit with different pickups (Seymour Duncan Design from Korea rather than the faux DeArmonds Fender was having made). Those Squiers are not inferior to the so-called Fender DeArmonds.
Pretty close... V C Squier was a string company that Fender bought and changed the name to Fender so they could sell their own strings.
A little over a decade later they attached to their first import line to avoid confusion with their American made guitars.

DeArmond was a maker of pickups, not guitars.
Fender bought the company in the 1997.
After purchasing Guild in, IIRC, 1996 when they decided to make an import line for Guild, much like they did earlier with the Squier name, they used a name that had some musical instruments background to avoid confusion as Guild was a predominantly American made line although in the 70s they had the Madeira line for acoustics and in the 80s, Burnside for Electrics... both MIJ.
In 1998 they market Dearmond guitars, import versions of Guild's guitar line until 2001.
Then in 2002, with some small changes, Headstock, logo, inlays, pickups etc. they were marketed as Squier Series 24, the 24 a reference to the scale length. The model numbers remained the same as when they were badged DeArmond. They stopped in 2004.

Also... Guild electric were really based on Gibsons with small changes to avoid problems with Gibson.
a few pics...
2001 DeArmond M-66 with "DeArmatron" pickups.
Note rounded horn on the cutaway and a different headstock to keep Guild different than Gibson continued.
20210125_175134.jpg
20210125_175144.jpg
they used 3 different pickups, an open coil humbucker used on the lowest models, the DeArmatrons shown above and the Gold 2K models which are MIA.
20200418_142048 (3).jpg
As far as I have been able to find out, lower models with bolt on necks and humbuckers were made in Indonesia as were mid level models with bolt on necks and DeArmatron pickups.

Set neck models had DeArmond 2K pickups and were manufactured in Korea.

2002 Squier Series 24 -S-73
Based on the DeArmond S-73, which was based on the Guild S-100, which was based on the Gibson SG... but the top horn was longer than the bottom horn, the SGs horns were equal.
Different pickups, Duncan Designed HB102, 103. Different headstock, inlays etc. than Dearmond.
100_6956.JPG 100_6957 (1).JPG
I hope this is helpful

Its OK to have differing opinions concerning the Series 24 guitars and those put out under the DeArmond name. In my opinion, the Series 24 guitars were a step down from the DeArmonds. As I said, it is OK to think otherwise.
I'm glad you clarified that for me, but I was going to have my own opinion even if it wasn't OK, but thank you for being OK with others having their own opinions even if they are different than yours ...
😈
 

BobbyMac

Squier-Meister
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 10, 2021
121
Texas Panhandle
"I'm glad you clarified that for me, but I was going to have my own opinion even if it wasn't OK, but thank you for being OK with others having their own opinions even if they are different than yours ..."

Now you're just being a smart-aleck.
😈
 


Top