Scales and Modes Site

Discussion in 'Music, Theory, Tab and Such' started by Angry Possum, Jan 14, 2021.

  1. Angry Possum

    Angry Possum A Psychotic 6 String Collector Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    58
    Oct 30, 2019
    Squier Town NY
    Needing some insight on how to play lead guitar etc, so browsing websites I came upon this awesome site with info on Guitar Scales and Modes. The whole site is actually very informative, and it's free. I learned the Pentatonic, now I'm moving on to the others.
    I actually never played lead guitar, (just fills etc) always Rythmn, maybe its not too late to learn lead. Any other recommendations on how to play lead, I'm all ears.

    https://www.guitarcommand.com/guitar-scales/#common-guitar-scales

    20210114_093905.jpg
     
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  2. Angry Possum

    Angry Possum A Psychotic 6 String Collector Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    58
    Oct 30, 2019
    Squier Town NY
    Before you can walk and then run, you must learn how to crawl. Cool 1st lesson.

     
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  3. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer John Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    Some good advice would be to not let yourself get stuck in the rut of playing up and down the scales, tell a story with all the notes, not just up and down.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021
  4. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer John Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    It also helps a bunch by knowing all the notes on the fretboard.
     
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  5. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    I honestly believe that is the most important thing you can do. But it’s such a daunting task. I have spent most of my guitar learning time trying to take short cuts and learn patterns. But if I would just learn the neck, I think I would be much farther along.
     
  6. beagle

    beagle Squier-holic

    Nov 19, 2017
    Yorkshire
    Chord tones and arpeggios. I can never remember the names of those silly modes or which one is which. Play a tune, tell a story.
     
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  7. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer John Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    I learned it by following this guy.

    The Best Way to Learn the Notes on the Guitar Fretboard - YouTube
     
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  8. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
  9. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer John Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Nov 24, 2018
    RC addiction....
    He has some great video's and easy to follow.
     
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  10. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    66
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    That is ok, but it's incomplete and makes it more complicated than it needs to be. He doesn't even tell you that a minor pentatonic is the 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7 of a natural minor scale, leaving out the 2 and 6. In A that's A, C, D, E, G, in E it's E, G, A, B, D
    He also doesn't tell you that a major pentatonic scale is the same pattern as the minor pentatonic 3 frets down. Take that pattern you show, which starts on the 5th fret to be an A minor pentatonic scale, and move it down to the second fret, and it's not only F# minor pentatonic, but it's also A major pentatonic. The major and it's relative minor pentatonic scale are the same five notes. Going back to the A minor pentatonic pattern that starts on the 5th fret, that pattern is also the C major pentatonic. A major pentatonic scale is the 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 of the major scale with no 4 or 7.
    A minor pentatonic is A, C, D, E, G. The relative major pentatonic scale is C, and the notes are C, D, E, G, A, the same five notes. It's justs sounds like A minor pentatonic or C major pentatonic depending on which notes you emphasize and what chords you're using it with.
    E minor is also G major- E minor pentatonic is E, G, A, B, D, and G major pentatonic is G, A, B, D, E, the same five notes. B minor is the same 5 notes as D major, it always is three frets away. To move from the minor to major of the same key, just move the pattern down three frets, and to move from the major to the minor just move up three frets.
    I also suggest learning the whole fretboard, and what the notes are in every minor and major pentatonic scale, because then you aren't stuck in the boxes, but you can play in any key anywhere on the neck.
    here's a link to a thread I started here where I explain all this in depth and how it all works
    https://www.squier-talk.com/threads...cle-of-fifths-and-how-it-can-help-you.178810/
    My second post in that thread explains pentatonic scales, and the relationship between the minor and its relative major pentatonic scale, and how they're the same 5 notes
     
  11. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe Squier-holic

    Age:
    58
    Dec 18, 2015
    Jersey
    Saying the note aloud as you play the scale is the way to do it. I don't always practice what I preach. Truth is, I don't always practice. This thread has me back on the saddle.
     
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  12. GEECEE

    GEECEE Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    693
    Jan 11, 2017
    MI
    I just learned a whole bunch here - thanks fellas!
     
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  13. pcampbell

    pcampbell Squier-Meister

    268
    Jan 15, 2015
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Not that I'm any great lead player (because I'm definitely not), but as others have pointed out, knowing the pentatonic scale runs is even more helpful once you know the relative majors and minors. For example, E minor pentatonic is G pentatonic, A pentatonic is F sharp minor pentatonic, B minor pentatonic is D pentatonic, and so on (I skipped several, just making the point with a few examples)...

    Lately, I've also been working on trying to integrate major scale (non pentatonic, just straight major scale) passages into what I'm doing. There is ALWAYS more to learn. Guess that will always be true.
     
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  14. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    66
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    Everything I play is kind of pentatonic based, but I know the theory well enough to add the two missing notes when I want to. It's pretty easy to start using the two notes not in the pentatonic scales, which are the 4 and 7 in a major key, and the 2 and 6 in a minor key. And, in blues and rock where we use the minor pentatonic over dominant 7th (and even major) chords, I trill or slur from the minor 3 to the major 3 a lot, which all blues players do, and I use the 7 over the 5 chord, because it's the 3 of the 5 chord. And the 4 is the root of the 4 chord of course, and is in the minor pentatonic scale, even though it isn't in the major pentatonic one. I'll also use those notes (4 and 7) in a progression that's based on major 7th chords, like Cmaj7 to Fmaj7, where the 7 is a note in the root chord (Cmaj7), and the 4 is the root of the 4 chord (the Fmaj7). In a minor key I use the 2 to 3 a lot, because it emphasizes the minor feel, and I'll use the 6 over the 6 chord, which is used in a lot of rock songs, like All Along the Watchtower (and a million others), where the chords are Am, G, and F, which are 1, 7, 6 in a minor key.
    I kind of look at things in three ways- pure major, like the Cmaj7 to Fmaj7 progression I spoke of before, and then I say to myself no minor 3, 6, or 7, every other note works, in other words 1, 2, major 3, 4, 5, and major 6 and 7. Then in a pure minor I say to myself no major 3, 6, or 7, everything else works, so 1, 2, minor 3, 4, 5, minor 6 and 7. And finally dominant, which can have a minor and major feel, so I say no minor 6, and the major 7 only over the 5 chord, so 1, 2, both 3s, 4, 5, major 6, and both 7s, except the major 7 only over the 5 chord.
    And that dominant approach also works over a lot of rock progressions that use major chords, not dominant 7th chords, like A, D, and E in the key of A, or D, G, and A in the key of D.
    I also play over the chords a lot to give me more melodic ideas to work with. So, in that Am, G, and F progression, I'll use the A minor pentatonic over all three chords, but I'll also use F major pentatonic over the F chord, and G major pentatonic over the G chord. Or, in that Cmaj7 to Fmaj7 progression, I'll use C major pentatonic over the Cmaj7 chord and the Fmaj7 chord, but I'll also use F major pentatonic over the Fmaj7 chord. And, getting back to blues and other dominant based progressions, you can use the major and minor pentatonic. So, in a blues in A, where the chords are A, D, and E, you can use A major and minor pentatonic over all three chords, but you can also use D major and minor pentatonic over the D chord, and E major and minor pentatonic over the E chord. Of course that only applies to blues in a major key, not a minor blues.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021
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  15. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe Squier-holic

    Age:
    58
    Dec 18, 2015
    Jersey
    Here's something I just threw together while watching the Rangers get crushed in their home opener. This is a movable major scale pattern that goes all the way up the neck in a cycle. I learned this, years ago, from a Richard Lloyd column in Guitar World magazine. I even wrote him an email and he responded very kindly. Nice man. His mind is at a different level. My effort is way dumbed-down. It goes on forever up the neck. Theoretically if the neck was a mile long it would just continue on. Works in every key. I think it's cool. In this effort I started at the beginning of the fretboard with the key of F. I just can't ever call out the notes, forget about memorizing the fretboard.

    I hope someone gets something out of this.


    F skeleton key diagram (2).jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
  16. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe Squier-holic

    Age:
    58
    Dec 18, 2015
    Jersey
    Here's the pattern explained as concisely as I could muster. Once you get the pattern down the tough part is seeing the notes on the fretboard in each key you work on. I was better at it years ago when I first delved into it. I've lost some Mojo so I'm working on it. Writing it out helps me. I hope it helps someone else, even if it's just making some minor distinction that proves useful in playing and understanding more of the neck.

    If you begin on the first fret E string you're in the key of F. Begin on the 2nd fret and you're in F#. 3rd fret is G, etc.

    Pattern for major scale notes.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  17. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe Squier-holic

    Age:
    58
    Dec 18, 2015
    Jersey
  18. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    That’s a good exercise!
     
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  19. Angry Possum

    Angry Possum A Psychotic 6 String Collector Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    58
    Oct 30, 2019
    Squier Town NY
    Kudos to @Uncle Joe . Great Job. Love the handwritten notes also.
     
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