OMG! If I wasn't so poor I would be spending all my money on this!

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by DougMen, May 1, 2021.

  1. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    66
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    I just ran across this video with Phil demonstrating the Somnium modular guitar. If I could afford it, I would be buying one of these with a huge collection of the modules to try every possible pickup in the world! This is amazingly revolutionary! Why isn't this well known as the most innovative guitar product in decades?

    Of course, knowing me, after spending thousands on every possible style of pickup- Tele, Strat, P90, HB, Firebird, Filtertron, Ric Toaster Top, Gold Foil, etc.., I'd probably end up with 3 Strat pickups, lol.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2021
  2. drewcp

    drewcp Dr. Squier

    Dec 14, 2018
    Saint Paul, MN
    There have been like half a dozen different variations on this concept in the last 10 years or so. It's not really innovative at this point.

    There was a company in Australia recently (3 years ago, I think) that tried coming out with a modular system for changing pickups from the front. If I recall correctly, it got funded, but then wasn't sustainable for them to continue to support it. I think it was made by Pratley guitars.

    But Relish guitars have a quick swap thingy.

    And another thing to look at would be the Boaz One.
     
    Kinnon09 and gearobsessed like this.
  3. grizzlewulf

    grizzlewulf Squier-holic

    Age:
    37
    Dec 11, 2020
    Lucerne, California
    So this looks pretty cool...as @drewcp says, I'm sure there are competitor products...why do y'all think this hasn't caught on?
     
    drewcp and Kinnon09 like this.
  4. MrYeats

    MrYeats Dr. Squier Platinum Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2017
    South Texas Coast
    I think most of us like the old school things. Like Strat vibratos..Leo had it right. Changing pickups to me is a personal thing and it just shouldn't be a snap in thing. It is better to own 20 guitars that all sound different. Just pick the one you like and go...JMO.
     
  5. gearobsessed

    gearobsessed Squier-holic

    Aug 21, 2013
    new zealand
    I can't see this idea as something I would ever use, even if I could afford to buy a selection of pickups, I'd find the ones I like the most and never change them.
    Seems an overly expensive concept and completely unnecessary to me.
     
    Caddy and JurnyWannaBe like this.
  6. Toddcaster64

    Toddcaster64 Squier-holic Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2013
    Ventura
    Practically speaking, I like the concept. Realistically though, it wouldn’t change a whole lot for me. I’d still get turned on by something new and want it, even if I didn’t need it. Just like now.
     
    JurnyWannaBe likes this.
  7. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    66
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    Because most guitar players, as revolutionary as they like to think they are, are actually incredibly conservative and boring sticks in the mud, who don't like anything that wasn't invented before color television, the wheel, or fire. And, I've seen other similar systems to this one, but none that were so well executed, IMO, with modules for most popular pickup types on the planet.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2021
  8. Kinnon09

    Kinnon09 Squier-Nut Gold Supporting Member

    937
    Mar 8, 2021
    Scotland
  9. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    66
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    Yeah it makes no sense to own just one guitar that could sound like all 20 of yours, proving to me that most of those here care more about amassing a collection of guitars, rather than actually making music on them. Buy, buy, buy!
    Of course I'm being sarcastic here, as I would, like everyone else, rather have a lot of different guitars in different styles with different configurations. If the Somnium were a lot more affordable, like a Squier version for $4-500, and with affordable modules, for around $40-50, I think it could be popular. I know I would then buy one, and get GM or other affordable P90s, Firebirds, Lipsticks, and Filtertrons, to have that variety. As it is, they don't make one I can afford, and their Strat style one doesn't even have a vibrato, because the springs, claw and block would be in the way for changing the modules, and you all know I can't live without a vibrato. I'd have to put a flat mount one on it, like the GFS one, or a Les Trem.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2021
  10. gearobsessed

    gearobsessed Squier-holic

    Aug 21, 2013
    new zealand
    I only have 3 guitars, 2 electric. I get all the sounds I want out of them. I'd rather be playing then swapping out pickups or amassing a collection.
     
    Hadronic Spin likes this.
  11. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    I liked the one with the five different pickups on a ring, where you just used whichever one was appropriate. Not paying $700 to experiment.
     
    MrYeats and Hadronic Spin like this.
  12. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Squier-Nut

    565
    Jul 13, 2018
    USA
    The Variax Shuriken can simulate any guitar without changing pickups.

     
    MrYeats likes this.
  13. SoundDesign

    SoundDesign Squier-holic

    I suspect it's because guitars aren't exclusively about function.

    We could probably survive quite nicely on protein shakes and supplements and yet we stubbornly continue to cook, sometimes with elaborate techniques that take way too long if all you care about is filling your stomach. It turns out that isn't all we care about.
     
  14. IronSchef

    IronSchef Dr. Squier Double Platinum Member

    Age:
    58
    Jun 18, 2012
    Flew here on my Dragonfly
    It certainly is a cool concept - but at $2500 per, plus $150-$200 per module (not including the pickups), you would be in for $3k to $4k easy. I think I would prefer buying/building multiple teles for that much scratch :)
     
  15. 65refinyellow

    65refinyellow Squier-Nut

    807
    Jun 29, 2015
    norcal
    If space was unlimited then yes. In my world, I have three electrics of which will be two strats in the mix in my small place.

    To get the swap out effect I will swap out the pickguard in one of them from Standard SSS ceramics to a P-90 or humbucker or rails type loaded pickguard(s) every few changes. It's still way cheaper than buying that swap out modular guitar.

    But before long, I think they will make a dongle that could be an intermediary that interfaces your guitar and iphone together with software that will expertly give you every possible tone.
     
    MrYeats likes this.
  16. grizzlewulf

    grizzlewulf Squier-holic

    Age:
    37
    Dec 11, 2020
    Lucerne, California
    Depends on the quality of the guitar, I guess...like, is this thing giving you the equivalent multiple $2,000 quality guitars, or multiple $500 guitars?

    Either way, it's out of my budget. But you know what I'm saying
     
    Leo Jazzmaster and MrYeats like this.
  17. grizzlewulf

    grizzlewulf Squier-holic

    Age:
    37
    Dec 11, 2020
    Lucerne, California
    I do get what you're saying, but I think that's a bit of a cynical way to look at it.

    I think some people may resist this kind of idea because they think of a certain pickup configuration as being part of the soul of a guitar. It should take a little surgery to make that big of a change. Granted, that is arguably kind of a silly/overly romantic way to look at it. But, I get it. You look at your favorite guitar hanging on the wall, you hear certain sounds in your head immediately. When you look at this thing, you see every sound, and arguably it might be harder for some guitarists to bond with the guitar as it doesn't have that singular personality to it.

    I'm playing devil's advocate a bit here. I do think this guitar is pretty cool. The way the modules click into place like cassettes is strangely satisfying. My inner minimalist likes the idea of only having one guitar. But, I also get that this takes something out of the equation of our emotional relationships to guitars, even if that's a strictly irrational way to look at it. It's a sentimental instrument by nature, after all
     
  18. Hoss

    Hoss Squier-holic

    Age:
    64
    Dec 20, 2009
    McGill, Nevada
    Cool concept I guess, it sounds good, but it looks pretty high tech to me. If something broke, I'm too stupid to fix it. I can fix an old fashioned one just fine all by myself.
     
    MrYeats and grizzlewulf like this.
  19. fadetoz

    fadetoz Dr. Squier Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 29, 2011
    USA
    It's a cool system. Would be great to have a bunch of the modules to test pickups. But I'm not going to buy one or a bunch of pups to try.
    This is also a great option for someone we needs allot of options and does not have the space for 20 guitars. Also a cool option for gigs I'd think.
    Use this and a modeling amp and you got so many options your head will explode.
    Anyone else here kind of miss the days you had one guitar and one amp and your only options were to play the dang thing?
     
  20. MrYeats

    MrYeats Dr. Squier Platinum Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2017
    South Texas Coast
    I play my collection quite frequently, and still have time to build a guitar the way I want it to look and sound, but then I am retired and have a lot of time on my hands. It is like a canvas, a guitar is, how do I want to present it tonally, and aesthetically. Then sell it and know somebody else out there is enjoying it and in some cases it becomes talk over the dinner table...
    "Hey I got this cool guitar from an old dude down in Texas." I have got reports back from satisfied customers...
    This is my way of getting more satisfaction than just playing them...Though that is fun too...Selah, and each to his own. I am not saying I don't approve of innovations, it's just that some are not for me.