Need routing help

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by jamesgpobog, May 23, 2020.

  1. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Pretty new to routing. Have a Ryobi hand held and a routing table. Telecaster templates coming soon. Members say make several passes, I understand that, have had goofs from trying to do 1 cut.

    But I haven't a clue on how to set up a slab to route with a template, either hand held or table.

    Any help appreciated.
     
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  2. RoyalWe

    RoyalWe Squier-holic

    Sep 5, 2012
    Western Oregon
    Subbed. Looking to make a tele bass once this pandemic passes and the university’s craft center’s woodshop is open again.
     
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  3. MrYeats

    MrYeats Squier-holic

    Dec 28, 2017
    South Texas Coast
    Calling @corn help this guy with some routing tips please....
     
  4. Michael7

    Michael7 Dr. Squier

    If you are talking about the outer body shape, usually you would cut it close to the line with a band saw or even a jig saw, and then use the router in incremental steps to follow the template up to the line.

    If you want to do a cavity, first get the bulk of the wood removed with Forstner bits so the router has an easier go at it.

    2007-01-05 07.43.22.jpg 2007-01-06 07.14.48.jpg
     
  5. After the forstner bit cuts, did you do the remainder free hand? That looks far too precise for free hand work.
    Cheers, Barrie.
     
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  6. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Like with bearing sizes or freehand??
     
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  7. surf green

    surf green Squier-holic

    Jul 15, 2014
    RI
    If you have a work bench, if not a piece of plywood will do, clamp (or screw) a couple of blocks to the table. They should be slightly lower than the body height. Place the body between the blocks template attached, so it can't move while routing. Use the hand router to make the inner cuts.
     
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  8. guitalias

    guitalias Squier Talker

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    Australia
    Using a handheld router, a router bit with the bearing at the top of the bit near the router itself. The bearing runs along the template with the last pass. The cutter is the same diameter as the bearing, so the cavity ends up the same size as the template.
     
  9. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    So for the outside perimeter, basically the same thing? work the depth of cut down slowly? And if the cutter is shorter than the body thickness, then near the end, the already cut body edge becomes the surrogate template?
     
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  10. Michael7

    Michael7 Dr. Squier

    One other thing is to make the perimeter routs in the appropriate direction relative the rotation of the router blade and the grain of the wood. Here is one thread on the subject, but there will probably be plenty others. For the Tele, TDPRI should have this covered, but you may need to look at many threads to get good sequential pics.

    This is a pretty good tutorial, but based on the Strat body. It graphically points out some things to do and not do.

    http://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/47366-routing-body-shapes-without-tearout/
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2020
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  11. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    I'm hip to rotation, direction, and grain. Helped run a CNC router for cutting out circuit boards years ago.

    Do you know what 'paper doll' is?
     
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  12. SubSailer671

    SubSailer671 Squier-holic

    Well, there is your answer. Sit down with a CAD program, make a gerber plot of the final shape with all of the cuts, send it off to the CNC milling machine. Press go and watch the magic happen.
     
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  13. guitalias

    guitalias Squier Talker

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    Yep, you got it.
     
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  14. MI redneck

    MI redneck Squier-Meister

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    May 7, 2020
    MI
    Just pick up this bad boy and go into business. ;)

     
  15. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Looks familiar. Ours was much smaller, but yeah, that's a CNC router...
     
  16. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    I wish. That was at least 12 years ago.
     
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  17. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    Do you also change router bit lengths, to keep the bearing 'on the template' as it were?
     
  18. SubSailer671

    SubSailer671 Squier-holic

    Presuming the cutter edge and the bearing are in alignment once you make a pass or two and need to cut deeper (e.g., plunge the bit deeper) the bearing can rest on the already cut surface. So no, you shouldn't have to change the bit for a square cut.
     
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  19. guitalias

    guitalias Squier Talker

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    No. As you had already described when I said, yep you got it.
     
  20. Jay Jackson

    Jay Jackson Squier-Nut

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    So lets say you use a table router, you will need a flush bit with a roller on the end it will sit about I/8 over the face of the bit. Place your template on your wood so it sits 1/8 inside the pattern. The roller follows the template around so its the guide , if you cant cut it in one pass because the wood is too deep/thick then you put the templet on the other side and cut it again from that side. You have to rough cut your slab to a close shape and you should get a router bit long enough to do it in one pass. If you want to try and cut a full slab not pre cut you put on the base plate measure the distance from its edge to the face of the router bit and cut a templet that is that much smaller round the shape, using a router to cut that way will heat up the router and wear the bit down fast.
     
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