Need a Telecaster, but which...?

CalAl

Squier Talker
Feb 26, 2021
64
Central Cal
I'm trying to choose between a CV 60s Thinline, and a Vintage Modified Thinline. For sale online, so I can't play them. Both are black with rosewood, comparably priced and nice condition. The VM is China, the CV Indonesia. Besides the obvious difference of the VM having a short scale neck, what differences might I notice? Both have regular tele single coils. Same weight, I imagine...?
 
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HSH Classic Vibe

Squier-Meister
May 28, 2022
324
Republic of Squierland
I have the Shoreline Gold version of the Gibson-scale (24.75") Vintage Modified Telecaster. If you want a traditional Telecaster that sounds like a traditional Tele, get the Classic Vibe. The VM Thinline has a sound all its own due to its shorter scale length and will never truly sound like a Tele in spite of it's Duncan Design vintage-voiced Tele pickups.

As I understand it, they did a better job on the new CVs of routing out to make it a true Thinline whereas on mine it is mostly just for looks rather than weight unlike the 1960s originals. But no one can say that a particular VM Thinline is heavier than a particular CV Thinline without weighing them. Even guitars of the same model made in the same factory at the same time of the same wood can vary greatly in weight:
Les Paul Weights.png

I also have the CV 50s Tele in Butterscotch. It is a better guitar and sounds like a Tele should. My advice is that unless you really want a Gibson-scale Tele that has its own unique sound, get the CV. Especially at about the same price.
 

HSH Classic Vibe

Squier-Meister
May 28, 2022
324
Republic of Squierland
Some marketing and specs from the VM:
Features
  • Category: Semi-Hollow Electric
  • Body: Alder (polyurethane finish)
  • Neck: Maple, C-shaped (glass polyurethane finish)
  • Fingerboard: Rosewood
  • Frets: 22 Medium Jumbo
  • Scale: Length 24-3/4"
  • Width At Nut: 1.650 (42 Mm)
  • Hardware: Chrome
  • Machine Heads: Die-Cast
  • Bridge: Vintage Six-Saddle String-Through Body
  • Pickguard: 3-ply parchment
  • Pickups: Duncan Designed™ TE-101 (Neck And Bridge)
  • Pickup Switching: Three-Way Switching
  • Position 1—Bridge Pickup
  • Position 2—Middle Pickup
  • Position 3—Neck Pickup
  • Controls: One Volume, One Tone
  • Strings 9-42
  • Unique Features: Semi-Acoustic Construction, Distinctive F-Hole Design, Top-hat blade switch tip, 24-3/4" scale length

A very affordable Thinline Tele!
First introduced in the late sixties, the Tele® Thinline brought FENDER® enthusiasts a new version of the classic guitar. The semi-hollowbody design was originally an attempt to reduce the weight of the solidbody Tele - the F-hole was a visual clue to its construction. This Vintage Modified Tele Thinline represents a Tele that has been modded with a pair of Duncan-designed Tele pickups for classic Tele tone and a 6-saddle bridge for better intonation. For vintage look and tone with modern touches, the Vintage Modified Telecaster® Thinline from Squier® is the ticket!

Built on the Fender® '69 Telecaster platform, the semi-hollow Squier Vintage Modified Telecaster Thinline features a rosewood fingerboard, Duncan Designed™ Telecaster pickups, chrome knurled knobs, a parchment pickguard, vintage six-saddle bridge and three-way switching. The distinctive f-hole design and semi-acoustic construction come together for a unique, jangle-pop vibe at an amazing price. This guitar also has a vintage 6-saddle bridge, allowing for more control over intonation. From The Byrds to early R.E.M. to now, America loves jangle pop, and this is the perfect guitar for this, power pop or any style. The shorter 24-3/4" scale length makes note bending easier.


Vintage Modified! Players from beginner to intermediate and beyond have done it for years—whether installing hotter pickups, alternate pickguards, or just plain personalizing their instruments with fancy paint jobs, modified means adding new twists to a familiar design. Squier's Vintage Modified Telecaster Thinline guitar features a semi-hollow body with a distinctive f-hole and classic Tele® tone from two Duncan Designed™ Telecaster pickups.

You can find info on the CV at Fender.com
 

CalAl

Squier Talker
Feb 26, 2021
64
Central Cal
I have the Shoreline Gold version of the Gibson-scale (24.75") Vintage Modified Telecaster. If you want a traditional Telecaster that sounds like a traditional Tele, get the Classic Vibe. The VM Thinline has a sound all its own due to its shorter scale length and will never truly sound like a Tele in spite of it's Duncan Design vintage-voiced Tele pickups.

As I understand it, they did a better job on the new CVs of routing out to make it a true Thinline whereas on mine it is mostly just for looks rather than weight unlike the 1960s originals. But no one can say that a particular VM Thinline is heavier than a particular CV Thinline without weighing them. Even guitars of the same model made in the same factory at the same time of the same wood can vary greatly in weight:
View attachment 239196

I also have the CV 50s Tele in Butterscotch. It is a better guitar and sounds like a Tele should. My advice is that unless you really want a Gibson-scale Tele that has its own unique sound, get the CV. Especially at about the same price.
Interesting. I'll ask the sellers about the weight, but the lighter the better for me these days. It looks like the natural wood finished CVs have all maple necks - would those be a different body wood than the painted ones? A side by side tone test would be good to have, but as you say, the same models built of the same wood on the same day might sound different. The natural ones are said to be mahogany, but that's sort of a generic term...
 

Benlostforyears

Squier-holic
Aug 17, 2020
1,048
Western NC
I'm trying to choose between a CV 60s Thinline, and a Vintage Modified Thinline. For sale online, so I can't play them. Both are black with rosewood, comparably priced and nice condition. The VM is China, the CV Indonesia. Besides the obvious difference of the VM having a short scale neck, what differences might I notice? Both have regular tele single coils. Same weight, I imagine...?
Is the CV Thinline the black with silver anodized pickguard? If so the body is made from Nato and the fingerboard is Laurel. Regardless, it all depends on what you're going for. If you want it to sound bright and twangy like a traditional Tele, then the 25.5" scale on the CV is essential. On the other hand, the short scale on the VM will make bends easier and have a slightly "darker" tone that you may prefer.
 

miket1117

Squier-holic
Gold Supporting Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,820
Kansas City
if this is the CV Thinline you're considering, the neck is maple, of course, and the body is (or was in 2019) mahogany. i cant say how much mine weighs, but it feels very light to me. it's my second favorite Tele (behind the Contemp RH).

only gripe i have, and it's a minor one, is that the neck and FB are uber glossy. easily corrected i've read, but i haven't attempted it yet.

1659560274873.png
 

Azureglo

Squier Talker
Aug 1, 2021
75
UK
They have been Nato for a few years now.
Man, that is going to tee off a certain bald Russian in-duh-vidual...

On more relevant note, Squiers are cheap enough to get a stable of very different sounding ones while barely approaching the cost of single Am Pro: here are mine all different, all very useful in the studio and live depending on who I'm playing for.

L-R: bought new in 1998 Am Std, 2017 Tokai MIJ Micawber Mk 1, Squier CV with SD Jazz in neck, Partscaster around a Squier Offset Tele neck and Vantage V72 body with Cats Whisker Mini HB and bridge single sized HB (interesting and very loud), FSR CV60s Thinline featherlight 6lbs, with Bare Knuckle Flat 50s and Freeway 6-way switch (main studio guitar)

52249699758_45329b7e4e_b.jpg


Edit: Actually I didn't really address the OPs question: My feeling (and that of many others) is that the CV60s Custom is one of the best value guitars out there. Mine weighs in at 7.2lbs and is supremely playable but I noticed that its significantly thinner than my Am Std et al.

The FSR CV Thinline ( the same one @dpang2836 mentions, done as joint run by Andertons UK & CME- Andertons last had 10 that go on special offers occasionally) is insanely light, at 6lbs dead, I can pick it up with one finger in the F-Hole. This is a honey of guitar and is used on 90% of my paying dates but mine has trick six way switching and pricey pickups. The stock guitar was a decent player, a trifle twangy but Teles are supposed to be that way.. The current ones have a "Mahogany" tinted body not this FSR BSB ( TBH, I don't really like the BSB shade used on this but its a tool not a toy). That said its not as impressive stock as the 60s Custom and most of its capability comes form its upgrades.

The VM is an oddball with a 24.75 neck that may be an acquired taste as others have pointed out so I'd narrow it down to the two current CV models.

Short answer, start with a CV60s custom, find a nice light one and I doubt you'll ever part with it, even though you get others.

Peace,

A
 
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Blues256

Squier-Nut
Apr 3, 2020
803
Poland
I'm trying to choose between a CV 60s Thinline, and a Vintage Modified Thinline. For sale online, so I can't play them. Both are black with rosewood, comparably priced and nice condition. The VM is China, the CV Indonesia. Besides the obvious difference of the VM having a short scale neck, what differences might I notice? Both have regular tele single coils. Same weight, I imagine...?
You need the same one i play here :
 


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