Neck dive on the Marlin Mockingbird

BlueSquirrel

Squier-holic
Dec 21, 2018
2,938
France
Fourth tip - If you need to add weight to the bottom of your guitar in order to counterbalance the machine heads, you could try fastening a pouch containing small lead weights for wheels to your guitar strap.
Below is a mobile phone pouch with leads (here, it contains 360 grams (I think it's about 12.7 ounces). You could either lower that or double it if you wanted to, there's enough room in the pouch.
20220703_211827.jpg 20220703_211900.jpg

Have fun experimenting!
 
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BlueSquirrel

Squier-holic
Dec 21, 2018
2,938
France
Here's and idea that popped in my head. This is a thick heavy metal washer, that you can purchase at the hardware store for less than $1. Should add an once or two of weight to the bottom of your guitar without having to do any mods to it. Other option is to decorate the bottom of your guitar strap with some lead beads.

View attachment 235468
@Shreddergirl @Randall E If you can still attach the strap or add strap locks, it is a brilliant trick !
 
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Kranix

Squier-Meister
Dec 30, 2021
147
England
A grippier strap would help, but if your are going to modify you could add some heavier metal knobs and some weight inside the cavity or better still in jack plug cavity, I am assuming its at the bottom right of the guitar that would be the right place to put the weight.
 

BlueSquirrel

Squier-holic
Dec 21, 2018
2,938
France
A grippier strap would help, but if your are going to modify you could add some heavier metal knobs and some weight inside the cavity or better still in jack plug cavity, I am assuming its at the bottom right of the guitar that would be the right place to put the weight.

That's a really good idea! 😀
 

Shine

Squier-holic
Nov 29, 2016
3,611
West Coast Landia
That’s a pretty cool looking guitar!

Lots of good ideas here, but I would probably go with whatever lightens the neck load. The tuner options above sound feasible. (The types of wood in the neck and body may be a factor here as well.) Generally speaking, I think reducing weight is preferable to adding weight, especially if you’re gigging.

I would not advocate drilling holes in the body and filling them for this purpose. Even if is not an expensive guitar, it’s still unique. If you decide to sell it later it may be harder to move since it has had surgery.

Least--or less--invasive is the way to go, IMHO.
 

jamesgpobog

Squier-holic
Feb 18, 2020
3,359
SoCal
I worked in the Ricky wood shop decades ago and one thing I did was sit with a stack of ebony fretboards with a little (about 1" square) recess in the back and glue in a lead weight.

I heard it was about sustain, but I really don't know for sure. It might have been on bass fretboards, but this was 1976, so......
 

Hal Nico

Squier-Nut
Dec 21, 2020
868
UK
It's a great looking guitar but when I play it standing up the neck drags down a lot!! ... I was starting to feel a pull in the left shoulder in the front after a few hours of playing... The tuners will have to be replaced but hipshots are heavy and will make this worse... help!

On Neck-Dive guitars I relocate the Strap button like in this photo.It not only balances the guitar but strap-hooks under the neck to stop it diving.


uGjPzmw.png



And here's it done on my V100 Les Paul as I have a bad right shoulder and it's a very heavy guitar,

w77X8E5.jpg


Notice also that I screw the button through the Strap. This stops the Strap from coming loose. No need for fancy Strap-Locks :)

:)
 
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Hal Nico

Squier-Nut
Dec 21, 2020
868
UK
@Shreddergirl @Hal Nico
Hal Nico, thanks for posting these pictures! You have a really interesting take on the problem.

Even on a heavy guitar like my Les Paul doing this not only stops the neck diving I can leave the neck in virtually any position and it will stay there.

It came about from my days being a Lead Guitarist and singer in bands and when I first started when I went to the mic and wanted to adjust it I would let go of the Guitar neck and it would drop bad so I came up with this solution. It also spreads the weight across the shoulders and back thus relieving fatigue :)

This is another little trick I used to stop pulling Jack leads out of my amps/combos on-stage using just a rubber-band,

n78xJih.jpg


adds just enough give so as not to let the guitar lead tighten if trapped.
 


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