Nato Wood 60's Classic Vibe

Discussion in 'Squier Stratocasters' started by matttornado, Jun 10, 2021.

  1. matttornado

    matttornado Squier Talker

    Age:
    52
    52
    Sep 6, 2017
    philadelphia
    Hello Everyone.

    I'm interested in getting a new 60's classic vibe that are now made of NATO wood. Does anyone have one of these? I learned what wood this is and all but wondering how they sound. I heard mixed reviews with other guitars made of this wood type.

    Should I not get this guitar because of this?

    Thanks!
     
    Thundertips likes this.
  2. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    45
    Sep 27, 2014
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    I have never in my life let the body wood determine if I should buy a guitar or not. Nato is similar to mahogany. Besides, 'tone wood' exists on acoustic guitars, not electric as far as I'm concerned. Go for it, it's a great quality guitar.
     
  3. Ace38

    Ace38 Squier-holic

    Age:
    50
    Jul 19, 2016
    Tulsa, OK.
    Electric guitars use magnetic pickups to sense string vibration and convert it to a signal that comes out of the amplifier as sound. Acoustic guitars use a chamber in which the string vibration is converted to air and then moved out as sound.

    In other words, the wood has pretty much zero effect on how an electric guitar sounds. Anything else is mythical voodoo sold to you by manufacturers to prove how their product is "better" than the other guys so you'll buy it.
     
    anthony79, drewcp, MLHull and 3 others like this.
  4. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Dr. Squier

    Age:
    55
    Nov 29, 2017
    Newnan ,Ga.
    Mine is about 7 lbs .

    Ive looked up the specs on it and get Pine, Nato or Alder for the 50s CV Strat.

    So noidea.gif

    Mine resonates / vibrates when certain tones are struck and it feels cool ,but Im doubtful its much more than the guitar enjoying me cuddling it :eek::p:D
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2021
  5. TimTheViking

    TimTheViking Squier-holic

    While my ear is in no way adequate to discern the nuances of the different woods used in construction, I do believe that they can and do have an effect tone. Yes, the pickups only create an electronic signal based on string vibration. However, I do believe that string vibration is shaped by many parts of the guitar. Nut, bridge and body wood can have an effect on sustain which shapes tone. Fretboard material, body wood and construction can have an effect on tone. If it were only pickups shaping the sound, why would a hollow or semi-hollow sound so different than a solid body using the same pickups? Most of these are nuances that I can't discern. But those with a better ear than mine can and I won't deny them that.
     
  6. matttornado

    matttornado Squier Talker

    Age:
    52
    52
    Sep 6, 2017
    philadelphia
    Exactly what I want to hear! haha thanks!

    I had many MIM Strats & Teles over the years , all being made of alder or poplar so just curious.
     
    Kinnon09 likes this.
  7. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    45
    Sep 27, 2014
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    A hollow or semi hollow sounds no different to me plugged in than a solid body.....but that's just my experience.
     
    Kinnon09 likes this.
  8. Twostratsfornow

    Twostratsfornow Squier-holic Silver Supporting Member

    Nov 14, 2020
    Ontario, Canada
    I bought one recently. I’m no expert, but it sounds awesome to me. I say get one!
     
    matttornado likes this.
  9. Thundertips

    Thundertips Squier Talker

    37
    Apr 13, 2021
    Ontario, Canada
    I have 2 Classic Vibes made out of Nato wood and they sound really good.
     
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  10. TimTheViking

    TimTheViking Squier-holic

    Some of the nuances are things like over-tones and feedback. A string does not vibrate at only the frequency that is the result of its diameter and tension when plucked. There are other frequencies hiding there from many origins. Like vibrations from the other strings. Frequencies hiding from feedback. The body wood will absorb/reflect the amped sound differently. Those vibrations in the body will get passed to the bridge and back into the strings. The more the body resonates, the more is passed back into the strings. The body also resonates differently at different frequencies. Does the neck reflect vibrations back into the strings? Of course. Does maple reflect differently than rosewood? Yup. Can I hear these nuances? Nope. But they are there for someone else to hear and enjoy.
     
  11. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Dr. Squier

    Age:
    55
    Nov 29, 2017
    Newnan ,Ga.
    I think mine is probably pine . It sounds real good too. Its the best playing guitar I currently own ;)
     
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  12. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    45
    Sep 27, 2014
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    A magnetic pickup does not sense resonance of body woods or any of that, the string moving over the pickup's poles causes the pickup to create a small amount of voltage...THAT is what creates sound. That's why a Strat made of concrete or cardboard sounds the same as one made from any wood.
     
    beagle likes this.
  13. backporchmusic

    backporchmusic Squier-Nut

    716
    Sep 6, 2014
    Va
    I hear a lot of internet experts say that wood doesn't matter. Every reputable builder, from Leo Fender on (and even Stradivarius before Leo) when asked will be glad to discuss the effects of different woods on tone and sound. Since I understand how being an experienced expert works, I defer to the people like Leo.

    Also, not everyone's hearing works the same, as @TimTheViking pointed out. Some people think that since they cannot hear a difference, there is none, as if their own experience of sound is the same--and as accurate--as other people's.

    Simple test. Does sound (a wave) travel the same through air as it does through water? Or does density and material affect that? The string vibrates through the wood via its mounting on either end and the result of that journey is caught by the pickup. Change the density of the wood it travels through, and you change the way in which it vibrates.

    If wood didn't matter, we would be playing guitars made of cheaper man made materials, and I'm not talking richlite fretboards but full body construction. If you can't hear the stinging metallic overtones on an aluminum necked guitar, then perhaps your hearing isn't acute enough to jump into the debate on tone woods.

    Everyone understands that some people wear glasses due to poor eyesight. We have taste and smell experts employed by companies when they design products, wine, food, perfume etc. All of our senses are not created equal, some are more acute, others...well, they aren't.

    The same goes with hearing. No shame if you can't hear subtle differences in woods, fretboard materials, etc. But if you can't, don't tell me I can't.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2021
  14. backporchmusic

    backporchmusic Squier-Nut

    716
    Sep 6, 2014
    Va
    So I just got a new nato body Squier custom Esquire. Hard to tell how that affects the sound, since I can't A/B it with another wood, but it sounds just fine.
     
  15. MLHull

    MLHull Squier-Meister

    Age:
    64
    491
    Sep 19, 2020
    TX
    I will concede that the wood used on an electric guitar might have a noticeable influence when played straight into a amp with limited or no tone control. But use the knobs on the guitar, pedals and amp and I really don't think it matters much. I look at the woods weight, hardness and appearance.

    Let me add that I am fine with poly finishes, synthetic materials and solid state amps if it sounds good. Often improvements are overlooked because that's not the way Leo did it, or some such nonsense.
     
  16. backporchmusic

    backporchmusic Squier-Nut

    716
    Sep 6, 2014
    Va
    Why doesn't a tele HH ever sound 'just like' a les paul HH?
     
  17. DoctorBB

    DoctorBB Squier-Nut

    952
    Mar 2, 2016
    Beaumont, TX
    Plectrum material and thickness or using fingers affects tone more than wood, even on an acoustic. Don’t worry about body woods affecting tone on electrics. Worry about the weight.
     
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  18. 65refinyellow

    65refinyellow Squier-Nut

    959
    Jun 29, 2015
    norcal
    While I think my all maple Les Paul Custom rang in higher frequencies more than a regular mahogany Les Paul, it could be more due to the hotter and brighter Tim Shaw pickups that came in those period Les Pauls.

    And I think the ebony fretboard on my guitar is a little snappier than my other Gibsons I had with rosewood fretboards.

    If it was the wood, then I think your CV nato strat can be brighter (or warmer) than similar older alder CV

    The only way to know is record your new nato CV 60s strat then using same strings, neck, tuners, nut, and pickguard assembly, play it on older CV 60s alder body in same settings.

    But when I play any sss strat through my drummers many Marshalls they all sound exactly the same. Zero nuance but all power.
     
  19. Ace38

    Ace38 Squier-holic

    Age:
    50
    Jul 19, 2016
    Tulsa, OK.
    Oh God, the Leo argument again. It's VERY well documented that Leo started making Strats out of ash because the sunburst finish that was basically standard in the early 50's was perfect for showing off the ash grain. Then, ash became hard to source in the quantities needed by Fender, so Leo moved to alder, a cheap wood used primarily in cabinet making that is known to take a finish well. It should be noted that blonde Strats continued to be made of ash due to blonde being a translucent finish.

    Another for the ignore pile.
     
    Guitarmageddon likes this.
  20. SubSailer671

    SubSailer671 Squier Talk Member ‎‎‎‎‏‏‎ ‎

    I think the different woods will resonate differently and feel different to the player. Some guitars are just more alive than others. I'm not convinced that this changes the sound coming out of the pickups however. It might change the way you play and commune with the instrument.