Images!

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,266
Honolulu, HI
My son, who (as is the case with all of my family) learned to drive in all seasons, here, up north, was kind of dumbfounded by what drivers did (or, maybe better) knew that they couldn't do, after he moved down to North Carolina..

LOL, my auntie who's from Chicago (CheeKAH-gee) was amazed at the lack of inclement weather driving skills in Hawai'i. But at same time she was surprised at the skills of those who drift cars a lot. I told her that we practice drifting a lot. However, most of us have NO idea how it'd transfer to driving on ice/snow.

Nor did we ever 'bend a fender.'

No Fender-benders? Good, yer Strats and Teles thanks ye, LOL! 😁 Seriously tho, that's respectable, few can claim that in Hawai'i. I for myself have been in accidents, but all of them were not my fault. They're all a case of being in the wromg place at wrong time. That's why I prefer driving at nights...less people out on the roads.

Driving when traction is low is a true skill. Learning it once fear sets in would, I think, be very difficult.

I agree, on both counts. I learnt how to drift by slowly pushing the traction envelope. Take a bend at 5 mph faster. Then 5 more. Then 5 more. If it gets freaky, back down 3 mph and practice it. Then push up in 3 mph increments. There is a S-bend freeway on ramp with a 35 mph limit. I eventually got my speed up to about 80 mph there, 59 when wet, taking those bends sideways.

But the skills remain. They are now instinct. Knowing how to "read" traffic and the road itself. How does oe learn such as an adult? Through books?

Only one way to learn physical skills. By doing them. It's same with guitar playing. Ye learn by practicing and learn new stuff by exploring different ways of playing and practicing that.

Reading the road and occupants thereon is like a psychological chess game. I did notice that what one picks up in one area doesn't necessarily work in a different area! You Mainland drivers reads VERY differently from Hawai'i drivers. The NYC drivers are so different that I now refuse to drive there, but then I refuse to druve in Waikiki too: same reasons, too stressful!
 

duceditor

Squier-Axpert
May 29, 2014
15,091
The Monadnocks, NH USA
what one picks up in one area doesn't necessarily work in a different area! ... The NYC drivers are so different that I now refuse to drive there.

My dad drove daily in NYC. But when je'd visit me in Boston he refused to drive.

His reasoning was thus: "In NY there is a method to the madness. Here there is just madness."

How true that was at that point can be illustrated by one thing I had to adjust to upon moving there. In parts of downtown Boston -- an area called "Back Bay" -- there was such a shortage of parking spots that people that arrived home in the later evening just double parked. They'd not crate an entire 2nd row, of course, as that would lock in those parked by the curb. But come early morning many of those by-the-curb parkers would drive off -- and that would leave the double parked cars simply parked in the middle of the street. And so they might remain for hours.

Imagine being driver used to weaving among moving vehicles -- all fully aware of one another -- suddenly finding a parked car in the middle of the road. Or stopping at a red light, only to have the car behind you hard beep their horn, and if you didn't move they drive onto the sidewalk (or a lawn) to pass you so they could go thru the intersection, light color be damned.

I experienced both of those all the time -- on my unprotected motorcycle!

Here in NH good curtesy is the norm. Speed limits are generally respected. But there is almost no "traffic" per se -- and I can go out in my Spider and go almost a hundred miles with, maybe, one or two stoplights. Roads like this:



Its all what one is used to! Or what one looks for. :)

-don
 

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,266
Honolulu, HI
My dad drove daily in NYC. But when je'd visit me in Boston he refused to drive.

His reasoning was thus: "In NY there is a method to the madness. Here there is just madness."

How true that was at that point can be illustrated by one thing I had to adjust to upon moving there. In parts of downtown Boston -- an area called "Back Bay" -- there was such a shortage of parking spots that people that arrived home in the later evening just double parked. They'd not crate an entire 2nd row, of course, as that would lock in those parked by the curb. But come early morning many of those by-the-curb parkers would drive off -- and that would leave the double parked cars simply parked in the middle of the street. And so they might remain for hours.

Imagine being driver used to weaving among moving vehicles -- all fully aware of one another -- suddenly finding a parked car in the middle of the road. Or stopping at a red light, only to have the car behind you hard beep their horn, and if you didn't move they drive onto the sidewalk (or a lawn) to pass you so they could go thru the intersection, light color be damned.

I experienced both of those all the time -- on my unprotected motorcycle!

Here in NH good curtesy is the norm. Speed limits are generally respected. But there is almost no "traffic" per se -- and I can go out in my Spider and go almost a hundred miles with, maybe, one or two stoplights. Roads like this:



Its all what one is used to! Or what one looks for. :)

-don

LOL, I know what ye mean. There's three distinctive types of drivers here in Hawai'i. The majority of the locals, are the courteous Aloha drivers.

Then there's the distracted Tourists drivers. They don't pay attention to the road nor are they even familiar with the local laws of the road. For example, they miss their turn off and suddenly make a "u-ie" often in a place where a U-turn is illegal anyway.

Finally there's the "Mainland" drivers, these are very aggressive drivers. They tend to speed and run thru turns and lights. At first they're often the Tourist drivers when they first arrive here, but after settling down some they become the dangerous drivers. Unfortunately many of these are the military personnel that gets stationed here, so they often forget that they are still subject to the local laws of the road when off base. Granted as a courtesy most minor violations are turned over to the MPs for prosecution under military court. However if they cause a civilian fatality, the civilian courts often insists on prosecuting them in addition to them appear before the military tribunal.

Unfortunately the combination of 3 very different styles of drivers makes for a very uhmmm... "exciting" ...time on the road. Thats why I refuse to drive in Waikiki (where there's a high density of the Tourist and Mainland drivers packed into a small area) and in areas around the military bases where the Mainlander drivers tend to cluster. Many of the road accidents often involves at least two of the three categories. I know because both of my parents worked in the Honolulu Police Department (they're both retired now) and they've told me (mind ye, not the personal details like names and other identifiable details).

PS: Many foreigner who moves here goes thru similar process (Tourist to Mainlander drivers) because in many countries their local drivers are often even MORE insanely aggressive than even the Mainlander!

PPS: If I decide to move to mainland, remind me to check out NH as a possible new location.
 

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,266
Honolulu, HI
black caterpillar with brown furs

I would love to see the Butterfly or Moth that it turns into !
I was curious too, so I google image searched using the @Loin Lover's image and found out its a Eastern Tent Caterpillar, a google keyword search using "eastern tent moth" got me these:

AD77496C-4E66-430E-A9C3-B29784524C7E.png
28CC1BF0-9AF1-466E-ADCF-E4328DC113E5.png

Considering the caterpillar's appearance, the moth isn't very impressive, LOL!
 


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