I'm never using non-cloth wire again

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by mduganjr, Sep 2, 2020.

  1. mduganjr

    mduganjr Squier-Meister

    Age:
    39
    239
    Mar 21, 2017
    Covington, LA
    I had a project that I was working on and I realize that I hadn't used the cloth coated wire that I purchased a few months ago.

    So I only need to run a bridge ground, and wire the input jack on a loaded guard. The instant I started using the cloth wire it changed my life!! I'm used to having to tin the wire, strip the plastic coating, and all of that. This made is so much easier and faster.

    I can't ever go back to the old days. Until now I'd used whatever wire I salvaged from other guitars. The difference is like night and day.
     
  2. KelvinS1965

    KelvinS1965 Squier-Meister

    232
    Apr 6, 2014
    Wokingham England
    I always use it now. My JV Squier is rewired with it, as are any other of my guitars I've worked on. I even bought a metal braided version for my Epiphone Les Paul (though the pick up wires were the standard plastic covered type):
    Control panel after.jpg

    My latest Esquire project:
    Esquire 5.jpg
     
  3. danzigdan

    danzigdan Squier-Nut

    716
    Feb 10, 2014
    WNY
    I just changed to the vintage-style cloth wiring and I agree it's much easier. The cheap stuff I was using before was very difficult to solder.
     
  4. VM51SQ

    VM51SQ Squier-Meister

    420
    Apr 14, 2017
    oregon
    That's an interesting set up on that Tele ! What's the battery for ?
     
  5. Lonn

    Lonn Squier-holic Staff Member

    Age:
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    Dec 19, 2009
    Carmel IN
    Admin Post
    Not understanding what the difference is for you? With cloth covered wire you still have to strip the extra cloth and tin the wire.
     
  6. otisblove

    otisblove Squier-Nut

    Age:
    45
    820
    Aug 19, 2016
    Chicago
    Not if the wire is pre-tinned you don't.
     
  7. Big tuna

    Big tuna Dr. Squier Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2014
    east Tn
    I have used it for years now it is the best for sure.
     
  8. StratNTele

    StratNTele Squier Talker

    Age:
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    64
    Aug 22, 2020
    Southaven,Ms
    I'm thinking he probably has active pickups.
     
  9. Shaytan

    Shaytan Squier-Nut

    Age:
    23
    986
    Apr 10, 2018
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Funny, while the first guitar I had practiced soldering on used your regular plastic-insulated wire, I've went with cloth wire on the first "big" project of mine where I've really got the hang of it.

    I got it from a local store because they sold it for cheap (about 1,5 euros for a full guitar rewiring) and, well, vintage spec, amirite?! I only realised the huge advantages of using it for this application over the commonplace plastic-insulated variant after having to deal with it later on, while repairing a guitar.

    Besides the obvious troublesome step of cutting off the insulation to expose the wire and twisting the copper wires together being absent, I particularly enjoy how you can shape the traditional wire into shape, the fact it's much more durable and less prone to break, particularly at the solder joints and, most of all, how it's immune to the almost inevitable issue of accidentally melting its insulation with the side of the iron when working through a mess of wires.

    Given the reduced cost when put into perspective of all the other fancy parts one may get for a guitar, not only I always opt for it when upgrading my guitars, I also add that to the budget of friends' guitars when I offer to do repairs related with the electronics. I'm also pondering to try out the version with braided wire as ground to do the wiring of my Jackson with just so the control cavity would be less cluttered, but I'm not sure if that type of wire is actually more difficult to work with. Any feedback in that regard?
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2020
    mb doug and mduganjr like this.
  10. mduganjr

    mduganjr Squier-Meister

    Age:
    39
    239
    Mar 21, 2017
    Covington, LA
    I only had to push the cloth back a little and solder. Simple and clean.
     
  11. KelvinS1965

    KelvinS1965 Squier-Meister

    232
    Apr 6, 2014
    Wokingham England
    It's to power an Eric Clapton mid boost PCB under the pickguard. It's actually an Esquire, so has a single (tapped) passive pickup, but lots of different tone options: Pull the tone knob for 6k winding/lower output/brighter tone, push down for 9K winding/full output/warmer tone. Turn the tone knob to add mid boost (makes it more like a humbucker tone). 3 way switch goes from a fixed 'cocked wah' tone, to standard tone as if the volume and tone are full on, to tone bypass which adds a little more top end shine/twang, so warm/medium/bright at the flick of a switch. The PCB has standard plastic coated wiring, but I generally prefer the cloth covered for everything else:

    Esquire 4.jpg

    With the bakelite pickguard on:
    Esquire 2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2020
  12. radiotech

    radiotech Dr. Squier

    Apr 23, 2014
    Freedonia
    I’ve done both, years ago in a box of wire I grabbed at a garage sale were multiple small spools of cloth insulated tinned wire, but the cloth was plastic impregnated (so you had to strip it, not push it back). I used most of it repairing Tube amps for friends through my decades long music hiatus, but a number of my early mods received it as well with the scraps left over. I don’t have a preference one way or the other (repairing electronics is my career), to me, wire is wire, and tinning only takes a second.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2020
  13. nmagi

    nmagi Squier Talker

    Age:
    39
    97
    Apr 2, 2020
    Athens
    But common wires come pre tinned too, it just deals with the oxidation thing that copper may have and it's known for ages. Tinning them once again helps making the soldering faster and more even, but on pots backs there is another story.. *BTW I just started in guitar modding -and feel very humble with that- and already used pots that are hard to solder and others that will just take some seconds
    Also it's the gauge that make the wire soft or harder, in electronics where there may be small space or some complex driving of the cables, silicon covered wires are just lately used for more softness. I do not understand why all the cloth cables are of 22 gauge but then use plastic covered 24ga or less, just wild guessing it ;s the cost effect along with the "unnecessity"of a thicker wire in a factory installation. I too used 24awg silicon covered cables just because that's all I have in my drawer. Of course plenty of like 10 to 14awg that would probably take all the space in the pots cavity not to mention the switch to volume mess... ** I also do not get it why there are people using push/pull pots instead of push/push but that is another story .
    If I would design a guitar nowadays, I would most definitely use different standards maybe smd boards, other switches and stuff like that, the small factor against the big one etc, the well known modders nightmare LOL. The wood shape comes to the carpenters dept .
    Btw have you seen Relish guitars? You exchange the p/us on the fly without using cables, there is some kind of frame you use to plug the p/u and then exchanging is like buttoning your trousers, but with magnets!
    **I edit to add there is the 4 core cable we use in pickups' wiring, the earth strands form a metal shield around the four coloured wires alright. But then there is the double shielded which should be preferred, with an extra -foil- shield, but of course sometimes cavity shielding is preferred or a must
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2020
  14. Year Zero

    Year Zero Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    12
    Oct 27, 2020
    Pennsylvania
    I buy tinned wire and you just push the cloth back. Since I switch I only use a small pair of snips to cut to length. Haven't used my strippers in months.
     
  15. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    You just push back the cloth. And I don’t tin the solid core stuff. Maybe you are supposed to, but I don’t and it works fine.

    161D1427-4187-4A9F-8AA8-115B8001554A.jpeg
     
  16. lost sailor

    lost sailor Squier-Meister

    309
    Oct 7, 2013
    Wolf 359
    You still have to tin what it is being soldered to, so what's the difference? Not enough to convince me. I use whatever I have in my 'shop'.
     
  17. Year Zero

    Year Zero Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    12
    Oct 27, 2020
    Pennsylvania
    Not if you buy pre-tinned. Cut to length, push the cloth back, solder, push the cloth forward again to help cover/protect the joint. Amazon is nice cause you can buy just what you need. Don't have to buy a huge roll. I buy 6 feet of black and white. More then enough for a guitar.
     
    Kenneth Mountain likes this.
  18. lost sailor

    lost sailor Squier-Meister

    309
    Oct 7, 2013
    Wolf 359
    I was talking about the lug the wire goes to ---- both need to be tinned or there will
    be a possible cold solder joint
     
    Kenneth Mountain likes this.
  19. Year Zero

    Year Zero Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    12
    Oct 27, 2020
    Pennsylvania
    Well if you don't mind stripping the wire, twisting the strands, tinning that then the lug go for it. I like to tin one time but it's all good.
     
    Kenneth Mountain likes this.