History Repeating?

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by Riffmaster227, Dec 3, 2021.

  1. Riffmaster227

    Riffmaster227 Squier Talker

    Age:
    25
    28
    Dec 1, 2021
    Detroit Rock City
    Anybody else feel we’ve gone backwards? Not necessarily in a bad way but I feel like the focus is on small amps and on singles instead of albums. Kinda like early 60s maybe? Idk I wasn’t around but you like how the Beatles used 30watt amps etc.. and how they started with focusing on singles. Feel like we’ve come full circle. Anybody else feel like this? Just something to ponder.
     
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  2. Eddie

    Eddie My Squier is on Fire !!!

    Age:
    52
    Nov 5, 2016
    New York
    I know that drum kits went from 30 piece units to 5 piece sets for bands from the 80's to the 90's. But these days, I haven't been following.
     
  3. fadetoz

    fadetoz Dr. Squier

    Jun 29, 2011
    USA
    From what I have read albums are a waste of money now. They say release singles or you will loose allot of $. Not sure if you are making music at home and releasing it yourself like I do. I don't have to pay people to record and mix it so it doesn't cost me more. But I'm thinking I'll just do singles for now.
     
  4. beagle

    beagle Squier-holic

    Nov 19, 2017
    Yorkshire
    In the early 60s, 30 watt amps were big amps. :D Gear back then was also much more expensive than it is now.
     
  5. grizzlewulf

    grizzlewulf Squier-holic

    Dec 11, 2020
    Lucerne, California
    Welllll it's complicated, because it's all very segmented now, more bands than ever gigging and touring, fewer universally known stars, more genres, less homogenized radio dominance. Like...if you want to see a band playing out of a wall of amps, they're out there.

    But on the whole, reading forums and stuff...I do think there's a bit of a push toward downsizing amp rigs. Guitarists have realized that most of us will never play in giant venues, and if we did, we could just route to the PA. 1x12 or 2x12 is sufficient for pretty much any practical use, and who wants to schlep hundreds of pounds of extra stuff, and/or store all that in their house?

    I think there's a growing acceptance of solid state amps. As pedal boards become more prominent, many players just want a clean balanced platform with headroom so the pedals can shape the tone. That's kind of opposite of an old-school retro way of thinking.

    I think custom guitars are way in right now, I bet every half decent luthier in the country is up to their eyeballs in orders. Home builds are popular too. Def not old school. But, guitar sales of all kinds are up, traditional models as well, so... goes both ways.

    60s Japanese gold foil guitars continue to have an en vogue moment, so that's pretty retro.

    Higher end vintage stuff remains very collectible and expensive, but I think most people who have that stuff tend to not gig with them, understandably scared of theft or damage. I think the collectors tend to be wealthy horders more and more, and gigging musicians actually are less likely to covet high end vintage stuff, especially when the market is so full of cool reissues and interesting semi-custom models. Practicality rules, again

    Making music at home in the bedroom is bigger than ever, thanks COVID. Not old school.

    So it's a real mixed bag to me. Some trends going one way, some another. And there are of course exceptions to all this stuff. There will always be tube-amp only guys, there will always be full stack metal bands, etc. Just painting in broad strokes. Generally speaking, I think accessibility and practicality rule the day, and most of the trends going on reflect that
     
  6. duceditor

    duceditor Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    75
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    As I have expressed before I think all the focus on gear is focus on what is largely unimportant. The music is the thing and it reflects the mix of the individuals making it and (their reflection of) the spirit of the times.

    People buy what they see. They think that is where what they hear comes from. But largely it does not. No more than classic painters produced what they produced largely because of who mixed their paints for them, made their brushes, or stretched their canvasses. No. For them too it was they, themselves, as creative spirits reflecting the spirit of their times.

    Jimi. Eric. Paul. BB. Someone more current. Choose your own favored artist. Look at them and their times and you’ll find the ‘secret’ of their sound.

    -don
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2021
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  7. Vinyl record sales surpass CDs for the first time since the 1980s - CNN
     
  8. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    67
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    Have you ever played a dimed AC30? It's the loudest 30 watt amp you'll ever hear, and can probably keep up with a Marshall stack. As for singles, the great thing about the late 60s and 70s is that FM rock stations would play whole albums all the way through, which is still how I listen. I never skip tracks and always listen to a whole CD all the way through. Also, there seems to be a comspiracy in the audio press (in print and online) against the awesome little silver discs, encouraging everyone to either stream or get into vinyl, with no mention of CDs. I gave up vinyl decades ago for the improved ease of use offered by CDs, with none of the setup and maintenance headaches associated with vinyl, not to mention the constant cleaning of records and stylus. Besides that, as soon as you play a record it gets some wear, and gets more every time you play it. I have many CDs that I've owned since the 80s that still play as well as when they were new, not to mention the increased space required for a vinyl collection vs a CD one. And, when CDs came out, they cost $15 and an album cost $6. Now, an album costs over $20, nd a CD still costs $15 or less. I'm not willing to make all those concessions for the arguably slight increase in sound quality offered by vinyl. Does anyone else find this bias and campaign against CDs odd? I know artists don't agree, because they make far less in royalties from I-tunes, Spotify, and other streaming services than they do from CD sales. Is the campaign against CDs by the audio press fueled by incentives they receive (remember the payola days of radio?) from streaming services?
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2021
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  9. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    67
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    I'm posting this twice so you can see all the text from this IG post.
    He says Spotify pays $.003 per stream! That's not 3 cents, that's 3/10 of one cent! 2021-12-03 (13).png 2021-12-03 (15).png
     
  10. otma

    otma Squier-holic

    Nov 4, 2012
    Owen, Wisconsin
    I would disagree with the statement at the end of that post. Platforms are not amazing. It's like saying "My record store is so awesome that bands should give me their albums to fill my shelves with nearly free, let me pocket all the profits, and thank me for the exposure of being on my awesome shelves." Tech platforms have led to the dominance of the middlemen, and it's a load of B.S.
     
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  11. DougMen

    DougMen Dr. Squier

    Age:
    67
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    I think he was saying that they have done a great job with the technological execution, and the ability to reach far and wide, but he clearly isn't happy with them taking all the money and giving next to nothing to the artists that are the ones that generate all their income for them
     
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  12. papa920

    papa920 Squier-Nut Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    68
    696
    Oct 9, 2011
    Illinois, USA
    I started playing in the 60s with a small vox practice amp . As I progressed my amps got bigger and bigger up to a fender Dual Showman . We thought that was what we needed , and of course Image was important . I sold my music gear in 1972 to get a down payment for a house . Some 35 to forty years later I got the itch to play again . Wanting to relive my younger days I kept upgrading to a Twin Reverb . I thought that would make me happy but it was much too loud to use and enjoy , I sold it and down sized to a deluxe reverb . The deluxe reverb is still too loud but I will keep it . I now mostly use one of my 5 wqtt tube heads . and that is more than enough . I have a camper on a permanent lot and the bands that play our saturday night shows usually use blues Jr or similar miced to pa . Most bars or clubs also us PAs .the days of Marshall Full stacks seem to have passed . And I am sure all of our backs are thankful .
     
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  13. duceditor

    duceditor Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    75
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Is worth mentioning that the need and desire for large wattage and multiple speakers early on was the exact opposite of what it became later.

    Powerful amps such as the Twin Reverb were chosen because one could play loud without distortion. And that is why they still are commonly chosen by 'chicken pickers.
    Marshall stacks started off that way as well -- that was the reason Jim Marshall gave for his designing his early amps as he did: To play louder and clearer. But the endless increases of volume (to the point of such causing hearing damage) eventually led to these distorting, too.

    Young players, looking to be like their 'gods' and idols, bought these big rigs, not for their clarity but in hope of getting the sound in their garage that they so loved hearing at big venue performances.. And then they added pedals to make up for the amp's to them undesirable "cleanness."

    All this is equally human and, well, funny. At least to this oldster.

    One watt can be loud. Five watts very loud. Fifteen ear splitting.

    For a home player I actually still play pretty loud. But even when using a five watt amp (of which I have several) I need to use a speaker soak to get the tone out of those amps I often look for.

    My Twin Reverb, which I use that when I want sparkling clarity, OTOH, is generally set at "2" on its volume control -- and that is with the Master Volume down to "4." Or I use the 5 watt Wangs Mini5, for it, too, despite its size, is very clean even played fairly loudly.

    1976FenderTwinReverb--TheBeast.jpg Wangs Mini 5.jpg

    No, neither "reason" nor actual understanding is behind what many of us did when we chose big amps. We were just following along with the crowd until, perhaps, such understanding took root and grew.

    But typically by then we were ourselves just seen as another 'out of it' oldster.

    And maybe, indeed, that is just what we have become! :D

    -don
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2021
  14. Angry Possum

    Angry Possum Obsessed With Music & Guitars Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Oct 30, 2019
    Squier Town NY
  15. Bluzy

    Bluzy Squier-holic

    Age:
    56
    Nov 20, 2017
    Hudson Valley, NY
    @DougMen, I think CD’s arent so much given negative press as they are over looked. I recently bought a turntable to make use of my old vinyl and even bough a few more albums at garage sales (Nostalgia is a thing!) I will still buy a CD as well. I do do the whole tangible aspect of having the thing in my hand and reading the liner notes. The whole streaming thing has its positives and negatives. For some artists it is a huge negative. As to the OP original statement, I think it all boils down t who you are watching. I think we are all in agreement you can make a or more with less gear now than you could 50 years ago. Some people make a $50 used guitar and $30 used SS amp sound great and sound like they do on more expensive gear. And watch a busker with a Roland Street Cube do their thing. Some of them are amazing!
     
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  16. duceditor

    duceditor Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    75
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    And I recently gave away fifty years worth of vinyl.

    I kept just three, and these for entirely sentimental reasons. My own (with the Abstracts), the complete piano works of Debussy (Jan's first gift to me), and "The Funniest Song in the World", my very first record gotten when I was about about 5).



    Crazy? Maybe. But in truth my owning all that vinyl was more about the 'romance' of the things than anything else. Sound-wise, when played on a good, well setup, system the supposed 'betterness' of the sound was, I found, largely a myth. And in truth streaming can sound just as good if, again, the sources and equipment are designed for sound, not just convenience.

    LPs are today seen as hip. "The bandwagon starts here."

    Now I'm waiting for film cameras to become the same -- that so I can sell mine! (And It is already starting to happen.)

    Yup. We humans is funny, funny creatures!

    :)

    -don
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2021
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  17. OOMTOM

    OOMTOM Squier-Nut

    Age:
    76
    852
    Jun 19, 2021
    Johannesburg South Africa
    Whilst clearing out one of my closets I came across two velvet jackets that I wore with pride circa 1965 around the clubs in Manchester England. One Blue and one Chocolate Brown. I knocked the chicks dead back then. They are as far as I can see in pristine condition having been hung in the correct protective sleeves. So I am waiting for the return of Classy Upmarket Cool to return so I can sell them ........
     
  18. Angry Possum

    Angry Possum Obsessed With Music & Guitars Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Oct 30, 2019
    Squier Town NY
    Great Idea.
     
  19. Angry Possum

    Angry Possum Obsessed With Music & Guitars Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    59
    Oct 30, 2019
    Squier Town NY
    The secret comes from their hands.
     
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  20. duceditor

    duceditor Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    75
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    with, maybe, a little bit of heart and mind in the mix. ;)

    -don
     
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