Finishing pine,...

Afrika61

Squier-holic
Ok, I'll look into Saylor too. Always good to have options and alternatives. I think it's bs for eBay to default Hawaii as an international destination than a domestic destination for US sellers or those with US warehouses.
I just remembere another supply that is good for shipping, that's ToneBomb In Calgary. They did my full thickness Mustang hardtail and it was a excallent piece.https://tonebomb.com/
 

surf green

Squier-holic
Jul 15, 2014
4,048
RI
A tip on finishing pine. Pine has many different wood grain patterns, as you can see in @Afrika61 original photo. Prior to using a wood stain, Minwax (and I'm sure other manufacturers also) has a wood conditioner, which is a clear liquid that, once applied to wood and cured, allows the stain to cover evenly. This helps to eliminate the bolder grain patterns from absorbing more color than other boards in the glue up.
We use this "trick" when staining interior pine moldings on a home trim project.
 

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,717
Honolulu, HI
A tip on finishing pine. Pine has many different wood grain patterns, as you can see in @Afrika61 original photo. Prior to using a wood stain, Minwax (and I'm sure other manufacturers also) has a wood conditioner, which is a clear liquid that, once applied to wood and cured, allows the stain to cover evenly. This helps to eliminate the bolder grain patterns from absorbing more color than other boards in the glue up.
We use this "trick" when staining interior pine moldings on a home trim project.

That's true if the goal is to hide the grain. Sometimes when I have an interesting grain, I might want that grain to pop out! Such as the one in @Afrika61's op photo...

1658472749571.png

Or the one in @IronSchef's picture of that fantastic knotted Tele...

1658472907550.png

Or the gorgeous brown patterned Tele in @jamesgpobog's post...

1658473036435.png

Weaken and cover that grain and knot patterns? No way! I'd just cover it with clear or amber clear and call it done!
 

Afrika61

Squier-holic
A tip on finishing pine. Pine has many different wood grain patterns, as you can see in @Afrika61 original photo. Prior to using a wood stain, Minwax (and I'm sure other manufacturers also) has a wood conditioner, which is a clear liquid that, once applied to wood and cured, allows the stain to cover evenly. This helps to eliminate the bolder grain patterns from absorbing more color than other boards in the glue up.
We use this "trick" when staining interior pine moldings on a home trim project.
Yup, sometimes a piece of pine just doesn't take well to a stain. I've had that happen a couple of times when I built workbenches for the a nephew and an old GF:
1658499072296.jpeg
 

Afrika61

Squier-holic
A tip on finishing pine. Pine has many different wood grain patterns, as you can see in @Afrika61 original photo. Prior to using a wood stain, Minwax (and I'm sure other manufacturers also) has a wood conditioner, which is a clear liquid that, once applied to wood and cured, allows the stain to cover evenly. This helps to eliminate the bolder grain patterns from absorbing more color than other boards in the glue up.
We use this "trick" when staining interior pine moldings on a home trim project.
Was at Lee Valley here in town today and I came across linseed oil paint. I've never used linseed oil or LO based paint before, but this stuff intregues me because it's a close match to the color that Fender used on some of its meteora:
1658523834849.png
1658523896617.png
I wonder though if you apply it like conventional linseed oil or if you can brush or spray it like paint?
 

SoundDesign

Squier-holic
Mar 8, 2016
3,148
Great. White. North.
Was at Lee Valley here in town today and I came across linseed oil paint. I've never used linseed oil or LO based paint before, but this stuff intregues me because it's a close match to the color that Fender used on some of its meteora:
View attachment 238463
View attachment 238464
I wonder though if you apply it like conventional linseed oil or if you can brush or spray it like paint?
Now I know you're a fellow Canuck for sure! ;)
 

surf green

Squier-holic
Jul 15, 2014
4,048
RI
If you consider it close or equal to oil paint, then it should go on easily with a 4" foam roller. The application will look as if it was sprayed.
 

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surf green

Squier-holic
Jul 15, 2014
4,048
RI
That's interesting: you don't get marks or layers where passes overlap with rollers?
These foam rollers and I believe the velvet rollers are used to paint kitchen cabinets and fine interior moldings. Like anything else, a "test run" needs to be done, a primer coat if needed, sanding between coats, and a clear spray top coat.
 

Afrika61

Squier-holic
These foam rollers and I believe the velvet rollers are used to paint kitchen cabinets and fine interior moldings. Like anything else, a "test run" needs to be done, a primer coat if needed, sanding between coats, and a clear spray top coat.
I think that I might give those a shot: they would have to be a little more uniform when it comes to laying whatever paint/oil/etc down than say the average brush.
 

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,717
Honolulu, HI
These foam rollers and I believe the velvet rollers are used to paint kitchen cabinets and fine interior moldings. Like anything else, a "test run" needs to be done, a primer coat if needed, sanding between coats, and a clear spray top coat.

I think that I might give those a shot: they would have to be a little more uniform when it comes to laying whatever paint/oil/etc down than say the average brush.

It all comes down to the amount of work ye do between coats, regardless of what ye use beit rollers, brushes or spray can/guns. The more prep work ye do between coats, the better the end results will be. ...Unless ye do too much and sand/buff off the previous coat, LOL! 😉😜😁
 

Afrika61

Squier-holic
Back in the late 70's I worked as a house painter and learned lots of pro secrets.

One of the things for oil based paint was Penetrol. Linseed oil and other stuff. I learned how to paint interior doors and get a finish smooth as glass. Think 'flow agent'.
Penetrol sounds like the stuff that Minwax sells as a 'pre-treat' for staining woods that don't take to stain that well, like pine for example: you lay on a coat of the pre-treatment and it helps the stain bind with the wood fiber somehow. Given that I'm working with a pine body, I'm thinking that I'll need something like Penetrol to get a uniform coat over the surface of the Meteora body.
 
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jamesgpobog

Squier-holic
Feb 18, 2020
3,359
SoCal
Penetrol sounds like the stuff that Minwax sells as a 'pre-treat' for staining woods that don't take to stain that well, like pine for example: you lay on a coat of the pre-treatment and it helps the stain bind with the wood fiber somehow. Given that I'm working with a pine body, I'm thinking that I'll need something like Penetrol to get a uniform coat over the surface of the Meteora body.

 

guitarmikey

Squier-Nut
Feb 2, 2013
569
Bucharest - RO
I use linseed oil… that‘s all.
 

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