Ever think about learning to play again with the other hand?

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by Eddie, Jul 5, 2020.

  1. guitalias

    guitalias Squier Talker

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  2. Eddie

    Eddie Squier-Axpert

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    Nov 5, 2016
    New York
    haha :) I started a bit of Justinguitar's first lesson. D. It's a mess. Sounds like mud. ha ha. Hopefully, it'll get better.

    I got the Em down clearer. Am is ok also. D, C, and G aren't happening for now.

    Practicing some walking as well. High E and low E are ok ... anything in the middle gets jumbled up because my left hand isn't coordinated to pick properly.

    It's ok ... it's a time issue.
     
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  3. SoleilSF

    SoleilSF Squier-Meister

    485
    Mar 1, 2019
    San Francisco
    @Eddie

    'Justin Guitar' person spent the last year learning to play left handed and all his trials and tribulations of daily learning are supposed to be on his website.

    He used the 'new guitar' learning process to re-configure his online guitar learning course.

    His course was fantastic, AND his new course is even better because of his experience learning to play left handed.

    He admitted (as an experienced player creating a guitar course) saying that it's easy to do this chord or scale, or make this move up or down the neck even on one string is easy... until he had to do it, play it, left-handed and found out how difficult it is for new players ... really not at all easy for a new guitar player.
     
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  4. Eddie

    Eddie Squier-Axpert

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    Nov 5, 2016
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    My first guitar teacher made me work out of the Alfred's I book when I first started back in 1984. Played Mary Had a Little Lamb for a year. What a waste of time. I couldn't play a single song for over a year.

    My goal is to solidify Em, D, G, Am, and C ... along with some walking practices. I hope to get those down and play some songs. :)

    2nd day is coming along. Better than day 1. I'm confident that every day will get better. This is a challenge. It's also fun.
     
  5. guitalias

    guitalias Squier Talker

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    I've been learning with Justin's new course, pretty much been keeping up with the release of new lessons. I check in with Nitsuj's final lesson effort to help me decide if I'm ready to move on to the next lesson. He now has a PRS lefty.
     
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  6. SoleilSF

    SoleilSF Squier-Meister

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    Mar 1, 2019
    San Francisco

    For the play along for each lesson, I keep going back to the original set of lessons because he actually uses his app for the play along.
    So you get you get benefits of swing the chord shades via the App, and benefits of both sets of lessons.

    The App is excellent.
     
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  7. guitalias

    guitalias Squier Talker

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    Yep, I've been using his app also, very good, not just for the songs. His metronome has a useful speeder upperer that I keep going back to if there are particular chord changes I'm having trouble with.
     
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  8. Maguchi

    Maguchi Squier Talker

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    Yes why not. When I worked in Alaska, the only guitar available to play was a left handed acoustic. It really wasn't that hard to play it lefty, even though I'm a righty. Now that I'm starting to get tendinitis and trigger finger in my left hand, I'm thinking of playing lefty again. As far as getting a left hand guitar or not, all options are available. Could be a left handed guitar, or the guitar strung upside down a la Coco Montoya, right handed guitar flipped and strung lefty. I guess experimenting with the various options we will settle on the one most comfortable for each of us.
     
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  9. brodg68

    brodg68 Squier-Meister

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    All I can say is
    upload_2020-7-17_18-27-41.png
     
  10. Eddie

    Eddie Squier-Axpert

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    Nov 5, 2016
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    Day 4 is getting better. I'm still working the basic chords and doing my 1234 walks. It's boring, so I'm watching cartoons while practicing.

    Then when I go back righty, it all feels good again. Southpaw is a struggle, but I'm having fun with it.

    If it were only not so humid today. :(
     
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  11. mofojar

    mofojar Squier-holic

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    Another dude I saw with playing a righty guitar upside down was Chris from Powerglove. That man can shred like crazy, sweeps and everything, but upside down to how my brain sees it. Incredible to watch!
     
  12. BT224

    BT224 Squier-Meister

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  13. jamesgpobog

    jamesgpobog Squier-Nut

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    There's a joke there that I in no way am going after...
     
  14. miket1117

    miket1117 Squier Talker

    93
    Mar 31, 2018
    Kansas City
    im an RH guitar player, and i cannot play bass well at all. i keep wanting to make chords.
    but ever since i bought the Hofner B-bass, ive thought maybe i should turn it upside down and play it left-handed... ya know, get my Paul on and all... so i trued it, but i kept the strings in the rh position... oh no, macca i am not. sucked worse...
    however, i also thought that maybe reversing the strings would help... havent tried that yet.

    personally, i think its not a bad idea to try it... i mean why not? you might get good at it and it might even help your RH playing. somehow. maybe?
     
  15. jefffam

    jefffam Dr. Squier

    Age:
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    Jan 26, 2015
    Portland, TN
    It is certainly possible that learning to play left handed would improve your right handed playing ability.

    When I derided to take up bass again ( after a 43+ year hiatus, restarted to help my wife who wanted to learn) I found it an assistance to my guitar playing. Of course the restart was utilizing lessons, rather than 'by ear' repetition.

    ETA: there was a short time I thought I would have to learn left handed. Right after the strokes, I had virtually no feeling in my left side, so fingering a guitar was not even a possibility. I had no non-visual feedback of what my fingers wee doing. Thankfully feeling grdually returned to about the 60% ish level. Enough.
     
  16. Eddie

    Eddie Squier-Axpert

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    Nov 5, 2016
    New York
    Glad your health is improving. A step at a time.

    I'm working the south paw. It feels like I'm underwater, and the panic starts to set in. But one step at a time. It's slow going ... and boring as heck. So I'm just breaking it up a little at a time. Chords are still funky and the 1234 walk is a slow crawl.
     
  17. LAPlayer

    LAPlayer Squier-Meister

    110
    Jul 9, 2020
    LA / Denver
    Nope. It seems counterproductive. If I had unlimited time to practice and work, it would still take me away from what I do - for no good reason.
     
  18. Eddie

    Eddie Squier-Axpert

    Age:
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    Nov 5, 2016
    New York
    I'm on summer vacation. My left index finger starts to hurt after extended playing right handed. But I still want to play. So voila ... play lefty. At least this way, I can still be productive guitarwise and give my left index finger some rest. I don't want to push it to the point where something bad happens.

    I just hope I can continue when the school year starts ... but then again, who knows if we're headed back to the school building when September starts.
     
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  19. Forum Guest

    Forum Guest Squier-Meister

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    Jan 22, 2019
    United States
    I’ve frequently debated it.

    I’m a lefty, but with most everything geared to right-handed people (be it scissors, guitars, golf clubs, etc.) I’ve learned to adapt to doing most everything right handed, except for writing. Granted, everything I listed as examples are available in left-handed versions, but sometimes not so easy to find, or choices are limited or the left handed versions can come with a price increase.

    With guitar, my early experiences were playing some of my father’s guitars which are all RH. So that just seemed natural to me when I began learning bass many moons ago.

    Once in a great while though, a cheap lefty Strat clone or acoustic will pop up on my local CL and I’m tempted to pick it up just to see how it goes. Like others have mentioned, I realize that this would mean starting from scratch in terms of training my fingers, which is a big part of why I have been so hesitant to buy a lefty yet.

    Question for the group: if I were to resting my current right handed acoustic into a lefty configuration just to try it out, would I be ok without filing the nut?
     
  20. Best1989

    Best1989 Squier-holic

    Apr 25, 2019
    Arequipa