E-series Jazz Bass neck woes

Discussion in 'Japanese Vintage Squiers' started by slumpy, Jun 24, 2021.

  1. slumpy

    slumpy Squier Talker

    Age:
    60
    36
    Jan 30, 2021
    UK
    In a nutshell the truss rod doesn't work from about the 12th/14th fret up to the pocket. The rest of it works perfectly, but it's a pain having half a dozen that are too high.

    I'm looking at some minor but lasting surgery on those high frets, which I would rather not. Or popping the skunk stripe out and trying to locate and replace a 40-year old truss rod without needing a new fretboard or refret.

    Or whatever anyone else can recommend!
     
    Robb likes this.
  2. SoundDesign

    SoundDesign Squier-holic

    The first question is, does tightening the truss rod straighten the neck and does loosening it add bow to the neck? Does that range of movement allow you set neck relief within Fender spec and does it stay where you set it (barring significvant temp / humidty changes)? If it does, the truss rod is most likely working properly. When we assess if a truss rod is working or not, it's kind of a binary thing. It's either doing what I described above or it's not. It's not impossible that something more "exotic" is wrong with your truss beyond working / not working but it would be unusual.

    If you check neck relief by depressing the 1st fret and the fret where the neck meets the body and then measure the gap between string and fret at the 8th fret, is that relief is within Fender spec for your fretboard radius? If you measure your string height measurement at the 17th fret is that also within Fender spec? If you are able to set it up within Fender spec and your last few frets are fretting out, you may have a neck or heel "hump" on your hands. If that is the case and it's not too bad, a partial fret level will sort you out. If it's more severe, those frets may need to be removed, the fretboard planed and then partially refretted.
     
    Robb likes this.
  3. Robb

    Robb Squier-holic

    Jan 13, 2011
    Chertsey Canada.
    I would put it on my heat press and tight the truss rod to death, give it an upbow heating it up for an hour and a half, let it cool down for a day, release the heat kit and losen the truss rod to perfect straitness, that is if you know someone with a heat press, works 99% on the time.
     
  4. slumpy

    slumpy Squier Talker

    Age:
    60
    36
    Jan 30, 2021
    UK
    60 years and finally my brother comes in useful. He's a cabinet maker with all sorts of stuff.
     
    Robb likes this.
  5. slumpy

    slumpy Squier Talker

    Age:
    60
    36
    Jan 30, 2021
    UK
    I don't have it here to check but it's almost like there are two parts to the truss rod, half that goes both ways and half that is rigid. Logically that can't happen but I can't describe it any other way. I will retrieve it at the weekend and see what can be done...
     
    Robb likes this.
  6. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Squier-Nut

    sounds like you have the dreaded S curve. I had a precision bass special neck that I wanted to use on my first bass build. 1.5" nut, beautiful rosewood fingerboard. I get it all built and then tried to set it up. Woah, weird fret buzz here and there. Nothing could be done with the truss rod to alleviate the problem

    Something like the heat press mentioned above, or pulling all the frets, planing the fingerboard or even removing the fingerboard, etc. Nearly all of those are beyond the reach of all but the most heavily equipped luthiers. The vast majority of the time, it is more economical to replace the neck.