Doctor’s failed prognosis has been a blessing

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by 65refinyellow, Sep 19, 2021.

  1. 65refinyellow

    65refinyellow Squier-holic

    Jun 29, 2015
    norcal
    So the cardiologist who has my exact same issue (lack of exercise, bad diet, bad genetics, and the resulting bad heart valves not helped by bad sleep apnea) told me I am screwed if I don’t do something physical for a living.

    People like me but in a white collar job live two years, maybe three.

    So I am a construction worker and I love it! At my last visit he said I could go twenty or more and also healthy until the end.

    The key is have a physical job and never retire.

    People who do retire always proclaim that they will keep “physically busy” for their health but the cardiologist says they almost all die pretty quickly when they retire with cardiac issues.

    So it’s like being a shark where if you stop swimming then you die but that beats watching retired people with money have their last dance with Mr Alzheimer’s. In the poorer city across the bay, you hear more stories of a blue collar worker dropping of a heart attack or dying in their sleep, and while we all die eventually I would rather be the latter.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2021
  2. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Guy Who Likes to Play Guitar Silver Supporting Member

    Sounds like a good career change for you. As I once heard during a wedding toast... may you live as long as you want to, and want to as long as you live!
     
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  3. CV50sFan90

    CV50sFan90 Squier-Meister

    Age:
    31
    241
    Oct 10, 2020
    Minnesota
    My grandfather used to own and operate a house moving company. Not like packing other people's things up and moving it across town to their new house, but jacking entire houses up on cribs made of railroad ties then loading them up on an old 50's International flatbed winch truck and driving them across town or across counties or rarely over into Eastern Montana (he was in the Fargo/Moorhead area). He smoked a pack a day from age 13 to age 80, when he stopped working. His first month after retirement, he had a heart attack on a plane heading back from Hawaii. He made it through that, quit smoking and altered his diet. Early this year, he had Covid and made it through that. Then he had his first stroke and ended up in an elderly care center with nurses on hand, and finally he had his second stroke sometime during the night and passed away. I'm a true believer that retirement (without a hobby, or a disciplined exercise routine, to keep yourself active) will kill you quicker than even a physical job will. He was a tough old codger that didn't let a heart attack mid-flight from Hawaii, Covid with a long history of smoking and poor lung function, or a severe stroke due to a blood clot in the brain put him in the ground. But a sedentary lifestyle, coupled with old age, will catch up with anyone. Work as long as you can, especially if you can hack it working a part-time job that keeps you physically active. It goes a long, long way.
     
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  4. wildelectric

    wildelectric Squier-Nut

    937
    Sep 23, 2016
    Western Illinois
    If I recall my anthropology class material correctly, it's only quite recently in the history of our species that so many of us have adopted sedentary lifestyles which require a minimum of physical activity. It's still quite true that we (normally) work best and last longest when we're active on a regular basis.

    Of course, it's also quite recently that we've been living beyond about thirty years of age at most, which presented us with all kinds of subsequent issues...
     
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  5. 65refinyellow

    65refinyellow Squier-holic

    Jun 29, 2015
    norcal
    When two of my doctors don’t think we as a species can keep up physically moving by sheer willpower in retirement speaks volumes.

    The masses when they retire get sedentary and illness sets in quickly. My mom worked until she was 76 and then retired. She fell ill in months. I can’t tell you how many times I have heard that including (even young ish) 38 year old retired master sergeants or 41 year old colonels on the base where we worked.

    For those you gawk at me thinking that 38 is young, you will get there soon enough and see that that age is almost still a kid, a youngun.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2021
  6. CV50sFan90

    CV50sFan90 Squier-Meister

    Age:
    31
    241
    Oct 10, 2020
    Minnesota
    Life needs a meaningful purpose, and that can come from something as simple as having a job to do. Without that purpose and a drive to "do", the whole system seems to kinda just give up. Whether it's a job, a hobby or an adequate amount of exercise doesn't matter. Keeping your body, and mind, active seems to be the key. Hope that doesn't come across as "preachy". Just my take on the topic based on observations.
     
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  7. 65refinyellow

    65refinyellow Squier-holic

    Jun 29, 2015
    norcal
    The funny thing is at the hardware store and the department store, there would be old rich people working there for six dollars an hour in those days or working as volunteers at the hospital which was 30% volunteers because of them.

    They’re a small hospital part owned by them. I was wondering why they weren’t sipping margaritas on the beach somewhere. Usually after a few cruises and vacations that gets really old.

    In the furniture department at the hardware store, it was a pair of really old men carting the heavy stuff in and out. But now I get it totally. They lived into their 90s.
     
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  8. 65refinyellow

    65refinyellow Squier-holic

    Jun 29, 2015
    norcal
    The doc saw too many failures of people trying to keep physically busy by just sheer willpower so he said work until you can’t and you will maximize both length and quality of life.

    You need some movement and a little stress is good too because stress free and sitting around kills a person very quickly and maybe our immune system also goes on vacation if we don’t have a job to do.
     
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  9. Archtops

    Archtops Squier-Meister

    290
    Jun 6, 2021
    SoCal
    I get out 3 times a week and pound sand for 2-3 hours straight.
    I use a metal detector on our local beaches and dig 50 to 60 holes trying to retrieve the target. It’s awesome exercise and the environment is like paradise.
    One problem I have is beer drinking. A habit I’ve developed recently due to pandemic problems. It really adds on the weight. Best of luck everybody!
     
  10. miket1117

    miket1117 Squier-holic Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    Kansas City
    i won't even start to go over my lifestyle related health issues (smokin', drinkin', carryin' on, acting out). but i can't afford to retire, so there's that. probably doesn't count for too much, but the way i pound on guitars sure does get the heart rate up!
     
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  11. CV50sFan90

    CV50sFan90 Squier-Meister

    Age:
    31
    241
    Oct 10, 2020
    Minnesota
    Sounds like my kinda exercise. Not only is it a workout, but there's a possibility of a payout!
     
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  12. Archtops

    Archtops Squier-Meister

    290
    Jun 6, 2021
    SoCal
    No doubt about that! Even though most times I feel like a trash collector, once in a while there’s real treasure. This is a Tiffany & Co. Platinum ring that retails for $1750 that I scored in 2020.
    A01230CE-4707-419B-9618-9AFC0B9857B1.jpeg 7A9382C1-E227-47BF-B77D-CB61CC9AF3CF.jpeg
     
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