Can it be saved?

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by jcmathews, Sep 24, 2020.

  1. jcmathews

    jcmathews Squier-Meister

    Age:
    61
    128
    Sep 15, 2019
    Gig Harbor, WA
    I posted yesterday in the Strat forum about 4 guitars I picked up for $200 (mostly to harvest parts byt an 89 Squier II was one of them). This is the body from one of those guitars -- looks like a previous owner got out of control with a router in the bridge pickup cavity. I have plenty of on-hand, non-expensive parts to use this body to build a partcaster that I'm sure I could set up to play well, but with this damage is it even worth it for a laminate body? Do I want to waste the parts -- even cheap ones -- to do it? Or are there any suggestions for salvaging this body? Or should I just make it into a clock, lol? Thanks all!
    IMG_1355.jpg IMG_1356.jpg IMG_1357.jpg
     
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  2. beagle

    beagle Squier-Nut

    907
    Nov 19, 2017
    Yorkshire
    If the scratchplate covers it, who would ever know?
     
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  3. jcmathews

    jcmathews Squier-Meister

    Age:
    61
    128
    Sep 15, 2019
    Gig Harbor, WA
    I can cover it, sure, but what's the impact on stability and tone, if any? After all, it's just a laminate body. I'm not a collector - I mod and sell guitars as a hobby since I retired. I guess what I'm asking is, could this be made into a guitar you'd feel comfortable selling for a really low price, like $75 or so?
     
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  4. late2guitar

    late2guitar Squier-Nut Gold Supporting Member

    999
    Feb 5, 2016
    Middle Tennessee
    No suggestions for salvaging, but it's not something I'd be comfortable buying even if it was restored. That's a lot of damage. As far as stability or impact on tone? I mean it's a cheap guitar. If we weren't willing to compromise on those issues, we'd all be playing guitars that cost thousands of dollars. My concern would ALWAYS be that I was one turn of the low E string away from splintering the thing.

    I think it would be a fun project to test my skills, but I couldn't see it being something you'd turn much profit on. Just my two cents' worth. Good luck with it. I like your retirement hobby. I'm envious.
     
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  5. beagle

    beagle Squier-Nut

    907
    Nov 19, 2017
    Yorkshire
    There's nothing wrong with laminate bodies, or swimming pool routes.

    As for selling it, it's not something I do, I give guitars like that to local kids.
     
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  6. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    I think that would be a hard sell if you are up front about the damage. So if selling it is the only reason you would rebuild it, I would say don’t do it. If it was me though, I’d put a cool paint job on it and put it together. You might end up with a great player.
     
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  7. drewcp

    drewcp Squier-holic

    Dec 14, 2018
    Saint Paul, MN
    You could convert it into a clock, and sell it as decor
     
  8. jefffam

    jefffam Dr NC Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    62
    Jan 26, 2015
    Portland, TN
    Maybe I'm missing something (seeing pics on my phone) but while very ugly contrasted with the conductive paint(presumably), it does not look size wise very different than a guitar built for a HB pickup. I think if you patched the conductive paint or just black, it would not look very different from one routed for a HB.

    Now on the swimming pool rout, I'm not sure the purpose, unless a HB in the p/g was too far back and would not fit.
    Selling is on you and your conscience. But as a player, I personally think it would be fine. As a caviot, I don't sell guitars. I've traded away one and gave away others.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2020
  9. jcmathews

    jcmathews Squier-Meister

    Age:
    61
    128
    Sep 15, 2019
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Great suggestions all, and I sense that you're thinking the same thing that I am -- that even though it can probably be turned into a very playable, usuable guitar, selling it might be problematic, both practically and ethically, even if only for $50 or so. In my mind, if I built it, I'd want to sell it -- I don't need it for myself, and I'd want to at least recover the value of the neck I put on it. So I think the clock idea is looking better all the time.
     
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  10. fuelish

    fuelish Squier-holic

    Build it up as a clock, then sell THAT!!! Takes away the worry of selling a possibly bad guitar, it's just a clock :)
     
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  11. jcmathews

    jcmathews Squier-Meister

    Age:
    61
    128
    Sep 15, 2019
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Nah, I'll hang it in my shop/studio. Ironic -- I'd want to sell it as a guitar, but I'd keep it as a clock. I need therapy...
     
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  12. wonkenstein

    wonkenstein Squier-holic

    Feb 3, 2017
    NH
    Clock? What about turning it into a shop stool for your bench?
     
  13. jcmathews

    jcmathews Squier-Meister

    Age:
    61
    128
    Sep 15, 2019
    Gig Harbor, WA
    With those cracks in it, I think I'll pass on putting my considerable ass on it.
     
  14. JurnyWannaBe

    JurnyWannaBe Squier-holic

    Age:
    60
    Feb 14, 2019
    30808
    The best way to improve your skills is by pushing yourself. If you're not confident that the body is not sound try and build it up. Maybe put a bracket of some sort and possibly some epoxy. Who knows, you might salvage it. Or, you could put it on "FREE to a good home".
    https://www.squier-talk.com/threads/i-pood-it-up.159439/
    https://www.squier-talk.com/threads/operation-heat-gun-recovery.177577/#post-957620
    https://www.squier-talk.com/threads/a-squier-talk-group-effort-guitar.180894/#post-982113
     
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  15. jcmathews

    jcmathews Squier-Meister

    Age:
    61
    128
    Sep 15, 2019
    Gig Harbor, WA
    I thought about using some wood filler to reinforce the body at that point and fill the hole. It'll be painted over with shielding paint anyway. I'm just not sure it's gonna result in a good instrument, and I really don't want to waste a good neck on it, when that neck could be on a better body that I'd feel good about selling. Still, it might be fun to try to save it. Or, I can make a clock...
     
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  16. wonkenstein

    wonkenstein Squier-holic

    Feb 3, 2017
    NH
    Just say no to crack.
     
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  17. Block Head Ike

    Block Head Ike Squier-holic

    There are a couple of ways to look at this IMHO. I believe it could be repaired "adequately", and I use that word advisedly! I would saturate exposed wood fiber with thin cyanoacrylate (ie "Super Glue") let it dry, then fill any voids with a 2-part epoxy, sand, paint, and assemble. I would photo document the repair and share the photos with anyone I planned to sell it to. I think we are sometimes hypersensitive as to what it takes to make a decent, playable guitar. If you come from the school of thought that anything stable can work, then this repair is not beyond the pail.

    Check out websites where a hollow core door has been used to make a bass guitar, or a six string! Will it be great? Maybe not, but I would be willing to bet it will be better than the masonite "cheese grater" labeled Silvertone (always thought that should have been "sliver tone") that I learned to play on. Heck, it would probably be better than the first three guitars I owned! "Tone wood"? Nah. Playable? For sure!

    https://www.google.com/search?client=avast&q=guitar+made+from+hollow+core+door
     
  18. surf green

    surf green Squier-holic

    Jul 15, 2014
    RI
    Clean up that bridge rout for a humbucker and use Gorilla Glue 2 part epoxy to fill or smooth out any cracks or missing wood. The epoxy is thick, and will pour into t s-l640.jpg he cracks. Once set, you could spray it black, done. I used this s--- to repair surfboards & fin boxes, you can sand and drill it like wood.
     
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  19. madmtnmotors

    madmtnmotors Squier Talker Silver Supporting Member

    Age:
    57
    43
    Feb 14, 2020
    Sunny Central Florida
    With careful shaping I don't see why you couldn't glue in new material where necessary. I made some mistakes on my first "Hackcaster" build (documented here) and ended up with a decent sounding guitar. Of course, I'm a noob with a tin ear that probably couldn't tell the difference!
     
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  20. beagle

    beagle Squier-Nut

    907
    Nov 19, 2017
    Yorkshire
    Plywood is about as stable as stable gets. You could either clean up the mess and fill it with wood blocks, or fill it with Bondo. Once it's painted black nobody would know.

    Playability comes from the set up, not what's under the scratchplate or the name on the headstock.