Affinity tele sustain lacking

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,253
Honolulu, HI
Two things of note here: my luthier shimmed the neck using sandpaper and he put D’addario strings on. When I played the guitar in the shop before I bought it, there was either no sustain issue or it is possible that I just missed it. It sounds like my priority should be: put a full wood shim in the neck cavity at the same time as I put different strings (elixirs) on as well as a higher end bridge. What do you think?

Sandpaper? As in sticking in a piece of sandpaper as a shim? The DEFINITELY replace that with a wooden shim. Sandpaper means ye not only have a different material (silica) but ye also have the microscopic air gaps between the sand grains which will act as a barrier to the transfer of energies between the neck and body.
 

DougMen

Dr. Squier
Jun 8, 2017
8,250
Honolulu, HI
IMO, as others have noted, Teles and Strats aren't really known for long sustain. With these Fender bolt on neck guitars, the sustain is achieved by pedals and the amp, and the pedal and amp settings.
 

Lanaka

Squier-holic
Feb 11, 2020
2,253
Honolulu, HI
IMO, as others have noted, Teles and Strats aren't really known for long sustain. With these Fender bolt on neck guitars, the sustain is achieved by pedals and the amp, and the pedal and amp settings.
A little bit of compression.
A little bit of reverb.
A little bit of crunch.
And you'll be just fine!

And I better stop before I start playing Mambo #5 on my Tele, LOL!
 

DougMen

Dr. Squier
Jun 8, 2017
8,250
Honolulu, HI
A little bit of compression.
A little bit of reverb.
A little bit of crunch.
And you'll be just fine!

And I better stop before I start playing Mambo #5 on my Tele, LOL!
I prefer a bit of delay (about 300-400ms, not too deep though, and only a single repeat) to reverb. I find it sweetens the sound, and enhances sustain somewhat , because the notes don't die as fast, but linger longer. But, I don't use compression, because I find it inhibits dynamic range and touch responsiveness.
 

JustABluesGuy

Squier-Meister
Nov 6, 2018
139
Texas
Two things of note here: my luthier shimmed the neck using sandpaper and he put D’addario strings on. When I played the guitar in the shop before I bought it, there was either no sustain issue or it is possible that I just missed it. It sounds like my priority should be: put a full wood shim in the neck cavity at the same time as I put different strings (elixirs) on as well as a higher end bridge. What do you think?
I recommend making only one change at a time, checking it, and then moving to the next.

I speak from experience having fixed problems myself by throwing everything at it all at one time. Often the problem does get fixed, but I end up not much wiser about what the cause was.
 

JustABluesGuy

Squier-Meister
Nov 6, 2018
139
Texas
Depending on the style of music minutes long sustain is often not necessary. One only needs a guitar to sustain until the next note is played generally.

As mentioned by Lanaka above, there are ways to tweak amps and effects to achieve more sustain if it is really dead.
 


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