Affinity neck vs classic vibe neck

bryanohio

Squier Talker
Apr 28, 2018
10
Dayton Ohio
Hey all I’m Bryan from Ohio new here an absolutely new to the guitar scene. My purchase was a affinity tele in bcb. I am looking for some answers. The affinity i have is a great beginner for me. I enjoy learning the chords an hope to one be able to lay down some blues on it. But I have the sausage finger syndrome. From what I’ve been reading the tele I have has a c neck. An the classic vibe has a modern c. My question is this. Certain chords I have a minor struggle with an I’m riding on other strings at times. So is the neck indeed slimmer on the classic vibe versus the affinity neck. If so I plan to purchase a classic vibe actually this evening on the inner web. Also curious if the slimmer body of the strat will benefit me more being a beginner as aposed to the tele. So basically will the modern c be more user friendly to me versus the neck on the affinity. Thanks in advance all I’m 39 an have always had a passion to learn the guitar an finally letting the adventure set sail
 

Photobug57

Squier-Nut
Jan 11, 2018
565
Hebron, KY
Hey all I’m Bryan from Ohio new here an absolutely new to the guitar scene. My purchase was a affinity tele in bcb. I am looking for some answers. The affinity i have is a great beginner for me. I enjoy learning the chords an hope to one be able to lay down some blues on it. But I have the sausage finger syndrome. From what I’ve been reading the tele I have has a c neck. An the classic vibe has a modern c. My question is this. Certain chords I have a minor struggle with an I’m riding on other strings at times. So is the neck indeed slimmer on the classic vibe versus the affinity neck. If so I plan to purchase a classic vibe actually this evening on the inner web. Also curious if the slimmer body of the strat will benefit me more being a beginner as aposed to the tele. So basically will the modern c be more user friendly to me versus the neck on the affinity. Thanks in advance all I’m 39 an have always had a passion to learn the guitar an finally letting the adventure set sail

I can answer somewhat. I too have an Affinity Tele with a C style neck. I also have a VM Strat. The necks are different. I have somewhat shorter fingers than most but the C style neck doesn’t bother me. I’ve been playing for around 45+ years though.

I really think it’s all in what you get used to. You mentioned “sausage fingers”. I know what that feels like!

Try to learn the chord fingerings first before switching guitars. I know, when I was learning, I had to stop at each chord change and think about what I was doing to make sure my fingers were on the right string, at the right fret.

Give it a chance. Of course, if you just can’t seem to get the hang of that neck, THEN, go to a different one. Remember, the Strat neck feels somewhat thinner only because it’s radius is different.

AND, welcome to Squier Talk!
 

HDCornerCarver

Squier-Meister
Mar 18, 2017
142
Lake George, NY
Considering myself still a beginner and have owned an Affinity Tele, a Classic Vibe Custom Telecaster, and a Mexican made Fender Strat at one point. I'd say stick to what you have, perhaps spend a much smaller sum of loot having it setup properly. Look at upgrading guitars after you've got the basics nailed down.

I can't say I ever noticed much difference size wise between the Classic Vibe and the Affinity neck. The finish is different, and CVs tend to come from the factory setup a bit better in my experience, but a good setup will even the odds there. As for a Strat, I can't see it being easier to learn on than the Tele. I learned to love Teles because I would strum a bit too wildly and constantly knock the pickup switch on the Strat. Once you learn to play, you'll find the guitar that fits, but the Affinity Tele should serve you just fine for now.

Welcome to Squier Talk! Hang in there, once your fingers become accustomed to stretching, chords will become cake! Then, you'll get to curse the universe for barre chords :mad:. It all gets easier with practice, just play the crap outta that Tele!
 

Las Palmas Norte

Squier-Axpert
Feb 19, 2017
10,514
Vancouver Island, Canada
The guys above say it right. Don't go switching guitars until you get a good handle on the basics. Once you're comfortable, and the situation presents itself, you can move on to a different guitar if you want.
Cheers, Barrie.
 

Merv_j

Squier-Nut
Aug 6, 2017
862
Lincoln uk
+1^
I started playing at a later point in life too! Best thing I ever did! I chose my first guitar based almost solely on looks and knowing that I would WANT to pick it up and play it. Definitely don't change your guitar until you have nailed the basics, then you'll know if any of you next guitars (there will be many) are easier to play or not. Just my experience others may say differently [emoji2]
Ooh, and welcome aboard!
 

MOD-VM70

Squier-Meister
Nov 11, 2016
320
Florida
I'm going to offer a different opinion. I tried (10 years ago) to learn guitar. I have large hands with shortish thick fingers and I got frustrated and gave up. More recently, I was encouraged to try bass guitar and I've found I'm much more suited to the 4 string bass. As far as the necks go, I've heard the Classic Vibe has modern C (like Fenders) and other Squiers slim C. The modern C is a little chunkier from front to back but AFAIK, the width is the same. Rather than trying to learn on a guitar that might ultimately frustrate you into giving up, I suggest looking for a guitar with a wider neck. Look for one with a wider nut which is the right tool for you IMO. If I was to try to learn guitar today, that is what I would do. I'm a lefty and I've had people tell me to try learning righty. I say life's too short and I already have enough handicaps. You may have to look at other brands and there are many to choose from today, even low cost guitars these days are pretty good quality. Welcome to ST.
 

Shaytan

Squier-holic
Apr 10, 2018
1,588
Lisbon, Portugal
I never had the chance to pick and play a CV Tele (even though I'll eventually take an afternoon to make a trip to a local store because I really like their looks). The only thing I'm not too fond about them is the super glossy, surely quite thick finish they apply on them. It really makes them pop out, yet I'd also assume they're gummy-feeling and not that functional.
 

surf green

Squier-holic
Jul 15, 2014
4,027
RI
From one fat finger to another here is the skinny on Aff vs CV tele necks (pic 3). The CV has a more meat which makes playing more comfortable. The problem falls with the fact that both necks have 1 5/8" nut widths, which makes for crowding of fingers on leads and standard cords. Play a D cord and all your fingers are all touching each other. Take a look at (pic 1 top) CV on the right, Monoprice Indio on left (pic 2 ) is a close-up. Both have a similar chunky profile, but the Indio has a 1 11/16th nut width, which is sometimes the deal breaker for fat fingers. Try a wider nut width and you will feel the difference. Welcome aboard. DSCN2106.JPG DSCN2107.JPG DSCN2105.JPG
 

bryanohio

Squier Talker
Apr 28, 2018
10
Dayton Ohio
Yes thanks all. My cousin is a guitarist an has been playing 30plus years. He told me today to start with a wider neck guitar like a les Paul then transition myself to the teles. Said I would thank myself from the headache
 

MOD-VM70

Squier-Meister
Nov 11, 2016
320
Florida
Yes thanks all. My cousin is a guitarist an has been playing 30plus years. He told me today to start with a wider neck guitar like a les Paul then transition myself to the teles. Said I would thank myself from the headache

Once you learn on the wider neck, and build up some finger tip calluses, playing on the narrower neck will be more doable.
 


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