What does a clean boost do?

Discussion in 'The Buzz Box' started by horax, Jan 11, 2020.

  1. drewcp

    drewcp Squier-holic

    Age:
    35
    Dec 14, 2018
    Saint Paul, MN
    Kind of?

    It would be a similar concept to setting your guitar's volume at around 6 or 7 (roughly) then setting your amp as if the guitar is at max volume, for home playing or your gig or whatever, then after that, turning the volume knob all the way up. You're going to be sending "more" signal to the amp. It's just easier, imho, to step on a pedal.

    Except it gives you the capability to put out even more output than a guitar set to 10.

    The usefulness really depends on what you want out of your gear.

    One of the coolest sounds I've ever heard...and I don't know what kind of guitar I grabbed, was with a DOD preamp/boost into a Peavey Vyper VIP something or other. It was just the grossest narliest fuzz sound I've ever heard, but still very musical. There's basically no guitar that can push the front end of that amp to saturate at that level without a clean boost.
     
  2. Jay Jackson

    Jay Jackson Squier-Nut

    Age:
    66
    685
    Sep 1, 2018
    sanluisobispo CA (3401
    so would a EQ that boost the Decibel level when activated be the same thing
     
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  3. corn

    corn Squier-holic

    Feb 27, 2013
    San Diego
    Crank the freaking amp, turn the freaking volume down on your freaking guitar, and you will have all the clean freaking boost you’ll freaking ever need,
    Sorry I freaking cuss so much :)
     
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  4. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    43
    Sep 27, 2014
    North Pole
    Yes, if you leave the EQ flat and just boost the signal.....
     
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  5. drewcp

    drewcp Squier-holic

    Age:
    35
    Dec 14, 2018
    Saint Paul, MN
    Yes
     
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  6. fadetoz

    fadetoz Squier-holic

    Age:
    47
    Jun 29, 2011
    IA
    That is the best solution.
     
  7. duceditor

    duceditor Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    73
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Volume controls on guitars can lower volume, but, apart from the relatively rare battery-powered active circuit, they can not raise it.

    The same if true for tone controls. They can roll off bass or treble frequencies, but not add them.

    A powered pedal can either raise or lower any of these. And by so doing change the response of the amplifier.

    This is primarily so for tube systems (overwhelming a basic, traditional, solid state system will square clip the signal), but todays "solid state" can be designed, using digital or analog circuits, to emulate the effect of an oversaturated tube with its 'soft clipping.'

    Here, as is so in so many things today, we guitarists use old terms to talk about and describe things. And the effect on understanding and communicating is not just semantic.

    -don
     
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  8. duceditor

    duceditor Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    73
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Screen Shot 2020-01-14 at 9.00.31 AM.png


    Not necessarily. The traditional volume/tone circuits on a guitar are interactive. Rolling off the volume also shapes the frequency response.

    If that gets you what you want, well and good. (Clapton's late `60s "woman tone" being a classic example.) But that roll off is part of the sonic signature and could prevent a player from getting the sound that he or she hears in their head if it is not understood to be so.

    -don
     
  9. fadetoz

    fadetoz Squier-holic

    Age:
    47
    Jun 29, 2011
    IA
    What I meant was it's the best solution for simplicity. Not that it's better for everyone's specific tone needs.
     
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