Wampler Faux Spring Reverb

Discussion in 'Surf Music Forum' started by grayn, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    Like many surf guitarists, I have tried quite a variety of guitars, amps and effects, to get that sound.
    But I'm talking pedals here.
    I first tried the Boss FRV1, which did a great modelling, of the old Fender, valve reverb tank.
    To my ears though, it was a bit of a tone killer.
    The fact that the Boss isn't true bypass doesn't help
    Plus I thought it somehow dirtied up the tone, but not in a good way.
    A friend, owns the full Fender reverb tank and reports that it does effect the tone, rather like the Boss.
    So it appears that Boss were just being faithful to the original.

    So I moved onto the TC Electronic Hall of Fame, which has a very nice spring reverb.
    I had to add some slap back echo to get some drip.
    It pretty much worked but I wanted better.

    Through some research and a friend's recommendations, I narrowed it down to a Strymon Flint or the Wampler.
    The Flint has the added benefit of some gorgeous, vintage tremolo effects and a stereo output.
    Both pedals are really good quality and I really took to the Flint's tremolo sounds.
    But it was the spring reverb effect that was my priority and to my ears, the Wampler won, hands down.
    The Faux Spring Reverb has that drip and some wonderful, vibrant tones.
    Long tailed, splashy effects that don't drown the guitar.
    But let it surf.
    It's very much a personal thing, for those who love that surfy reverb.
    I guess we can all hear things a little differently, at times.
    I think that having the reverb between the guitar and amp, rather than as part of the amp, also makes a difference.
    This Wampler pedal stays on, all the time and is occasionally joined by some tremolo, vibrato or some delay.
    [​IMG]
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    surf green, Treynor, Big tuna and 2 others like this.
  2. jackdragbean

    jackdragbean Squier-holic

    Nov 16, 2011
    Mississippi
    If it helps, I had a FRV1 and sold it for the same reasons. As much as I wanted to like it, I disliked how it muddied and dirtied up my sound.
     
  3. Ralph124C41

    Ralph124C41 Squier-holic

    Feb 10, 2016
    Very good to know. I am in the market for a (very) cheap pedal that has passable spring reverb sounds. Do you know of any offhand? I can get a great deal on a used Biyang Tri Reverb, a somewhat good deal on a Boss RV-5 and an OK(ish) deal on a Holy Grail Nano. That's all I can spend. I've heard the Nano has the better spring setting but the Biyang has some overall good sounds.
     
  4. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    A real tech head friend of mine, who has owned more pedals than I have guitars and pedals together, really rates those Biyang pedals.
    I've not had one.
    The EHX is pretty good though.
    I owned an Epitome, which had a Hoily Grail on it and I was impressed.
    I don't use Boss any more, as I really like true bypass, on a pedal.
    good luck.
    Cheap can be very good.
    I still use a Belcat tremolo and belcat Analog Delay.
    Great pedals.
     
  5. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    70
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Thanks for the well considered review.

    No doubt there is a lot of variance in what sound we personally like. Indeed, even what constitutes "drip" is, as I have seen in comments on my Creating That Classic Surf "Drip" video, not totally agreed upon.

    Choices! Choices! Yes to that! :)

    -don
     
  6. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    Glad we heard it the same.

    Cheers.
     
    jackdragbean likes this.
  7. Ralph124C41

    Ralph124C41 Squier-holic

    Feb 10, 2016

    I guess you meant "hates those Biyang pedals." I've not heard a lot of really bad reviews about them ... but I know many reviewers noted the spring setting is the weakest of the three.

    I will try to concentrate on the Holy Grail then.
     
  8. jackdragbean

    jackdragbean Squier-holic

    Nov 16, 2011
    Mississippi
    Loved my Holy Grail. Only sold it because my amp has a really good spring tank
     
  9. Big tuna

    Big tuna Squier-holic

    May 6, 2014
    east Tn
    I still like the holy grail but i am always looking for better without buying the real deal.
     
  10. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    You really should try the Wampler then.
     
    Big tuna likes this.
  11. oldtimer

    oldtimer Squier-Nut

    Age:
    72
    578
    Jun 23, 2015
    Aberdeen, Scotland
    Hi, grayn. I'd have thought that you would be more into the British guitar instrumental sounds of the late 50s and early 60s rather than surf. Back then, echo was the thing and not reverb. Italian echo units or a Watkins Copicat - all due to Hank Marvin.
     
  12. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    Well, I was definitely a fan of the Shadows as a kid and have kept an affection for them, ever since.
    Trouble was, they became very middle of the road, as the years went by.
    Very cheesy, with none of their initial energy and style.
    They had some great tunes, in their heyday.
    Apache, Wonderful Land, Foot Tapper and many others, still sound great.
    They had a superb sound.
    But Surf has an energy and drive, the Shadows rarely equalled.
    Raw and edgy but still melodic and at at times, atmospheric.
    And spring reverb is that sound, that draws you in.
    It's like a little taste of heaven.
    Reverb and echo are very much related both physically and sonically.
    But I never felt about echo, the way I do about that huge wash of spring reverb.
     
    Big tuna and oldtimer like this.
  13. Strato67

    Strato67 Squier-holic

    Age:
    50
    Jun 17, 2013
    Texas
    The Topanga is the best out there.
     
  14. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    It's a good'un, alright.
    To my ears, not as good as the Wampler.
    But it's just personal taste, aftrer all.
     
  15. oldtimer

    oldtimer Squier-Nut

    Age:
    72
    578
    Jun 23, 2015
    Aberdeen, Scotland
    That's true. The first few singles and the first album are definitely the very best of their output. I remember cringing at the sound of Norrie Paramor's added strings to "Wonderful Land" in 1962. Thankfully there is, or was, a "clean" version available on a greatest hits album. After Tony Meehan and then Jet Harris left, the Shadows lost a lot of edge.

    I never got into surf. I remember when "Pipeline" came out and I quite liked that. I may have dismissed surf too early on, but there were more than enough British guitar instrumentals from 1959 to 1963 to keep me busy trying to emulate them. Very few American guitar instrumentals appealed to me back then, but certainly "Walk Don't Run" did and so did "Wheels" which surely must be the best two-chord tune ever written.
     
  16. grayn

    grayn Squier Talker

    Age:
    58
    64
    Feb 12, 2017
    Lancashire, England
    The only other guitar instrumentalitss I really remember from that era, were The John Barry Seven.
    Their stuff was a bit of a mixed bag but some of it really worked.
    John Barry has of course, written some amazing tunes, over the years.
    Jet Harris and Tony Meehan did some good tunes, after the Shadows.
    Diamnonds and Scarlett O'Hara, come to mind.
    Though they were rather dogged by dodgy orchestration.
    Alawys liked Tony's drumming style.

    Cheers.