Veterans and Active Duty, Where and When?

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by Flyer91, Mar 8, 2017.

  1. Treynor

    Treynor Squier-holic

    Age:
    60
    Jun 22, 2016
    Dallas, Texas
    So...new to the rest of you...but not Danny and I. We both served in 1/17th (Abn) Air Cav during the same time period. Those were in my days when I was a medic. "You ain't Cav, you ain't sh!*"

    We didn't discover this until we chatted here on this forum. Small world, great forum!
     
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  2. Rollmeaway

    Rollmeaway Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    797
    Feb 7, 2016
    Fayetteville, NC
    Ughh, I used to hate that chant. Strange that there are so many medics I'm running into lately. I have been taken in as some sort of charity case or mascot for the combat medics in HHT, 3/73 Cav here at Ft. Bragg.

    They come here twice a year and rake the pine needles and yard debris around my house. They will be here again in a few weeks. I think it's an Airborne thing more than anything. They get about a squad of guys together and usually start on a Sat or Sun morning. I buy a dozen pairs of cheap work gloves, yard bags, a couple of cheap rakes, a case of Gatorade so they don't get dehydrated and some beer. Most of the time they don't drink much beer because they were out partying late the night before.

    It's pure joy having some young paratroopers around listening to their joking with each other telling stories of what the Army is like nowadays. They are using the new T-11 chutes to jump with. They had a lot of accidents and deaths connected with these chutes when the first came into use.

    Any way, these guys start at the back and methodically work forward. They bagged about one hundred bags of yard debris in about two hours last time. They won't take any money or even hang around for a pizza or anything. They just want to get the job done and finish enjoying their weekend. Hoorah! Some things never change. I used to wake up Monday morning after a weekend of hard partying and have to wade thru the beer cans on my front lawn to get to my car. My house was a hangout for most of my friends in the Cav. Though most of them were trying to get into my 'ol lady's jeans while I was deployed somewhere.

    Ahh, deployments, there's something to talk about.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017
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  3. Rollmeaway

    Rollmeaway Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    797
    Feb 7, 2016
    Fayetteville, NC
    In the 82nd back in the 80's, everyone was going somewhere to train for something. Treynor might remember this. So, the Cav had a platoon of infantry called ARP's. (Aero Rifle Platoon) The Black Hawk crew chiefs worked closely with them. When we weren't simulating engine failures, practicing autorotations, flying nap of the earth at 90 knots or any manor of death defying training, we flew simulated missions with the ARPs. I was like a junkie hyped up on adrenaline. I wore a thing called a "monkey harness" while flying. It was a body harness hooked to a hard point in the aircraft. I had to lean out and make sure the main or tail rotors weren't gonna hit any trees, other helicopters or anything as we were coming into an LZ to drop the ARPs off to simulate a hostage rescue or what ever they were doing that day and find them later in the day when they popped smoke in a PZ.

    But being the "type A" personality I was in those days I volunteered for everything. When not flying I was on the ground on a .50 cal team during field exercises. We were always "in the field". With aircraft or without. AP Hill, VA or Camp Blanding, Fla. I went through the Jungle Operations Training Center in Panama twice. I learned how to use a prc-25 there, platoon radio operator. I stayed after the training second time because something was going on and they needed Aviators to fly beans, bullets and men around. I never had to fire a door gun in self defence, thank God.

    Treynor, were you involved with the Fort Irwin "disaster in the desert"? Gallant Eagle '82? That sucked, we lost one of the ARPs in that jump. I can't remember his name. I was in a hover with the radio on watching it. A lot of medics earned their pay that day.

    Danny...
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017
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  4. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    No offense to the Airborne guys! Before you think I am making fun of you, let me say I have a bad eye, or I would have tried to be one of you!
    At Sam Houston, we had a bunch of Airborne "Medics" going to school with us. Their schooling was a lot longer and went much further than the usual.
    Anyway, I had just arrived, and on the weekend, I was sitting sipping cold beer in the shade, out of the Texas sun, while the airborne group put on full uniforms, with all gear, and were "playing" about 100 yards away.
    They would make a line at the top of a small hill. The guy in front would stop at the crest of the hill, turn around, bend over, and the guy in line behind him would lift his foot, and kick the guy in the top of his helmet, causing him to roll backwards down the short hill. Then he would jump up and run back up the hill to get in line again. There was booze involved sometimes!
    We called it Airborne television, and we drank a lot of beer watching them over the next few months. To say we were amused is putting it lightly.
    Several of us made up the plan to save some of them from themselves, so we basically harangued three of them into going to town to party with us. At ten o'clock, we had to stack them in the back seat, since they all went to sleep like someone shut them off!
    Their focus was on being the best soldiers they could be, and the rest of us were more focused on staying out of the Texas summer sun!
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017
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  5. Rollmeaway

    Rollmeaway Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    797
    Feb 7, 2016
    Fayetteville, NC
    That is a funny story and completely believable!

    It's a brain washing thing. Paratroopers are constantly told how much better they are than non-Airborne personnel. They can run faster, fight better, shoot straighter and look better. Well, that was how it was while I was in active duty. Non-Airborne personnel were "nasty legs". Some of it was true. We constantly trained in the harshest environments and always had a readiness brigade that could be in a theatre of combat, anywhere in the world in 18 hours. (so it was said)

    I think it's not as extreme today. Now, females are allowed in the 82nd. Mostly support or admin. Soldiers can't sing inappropriate cadence while marching or running. And they have to take "sensitivity training" courses. I don't know if this is a good or bad thing. The raw aggressiveness of these soldiers, whose main function is to be aggressive in the extreme, is being watered down.

    There is talk that the 82nd is obsolete. That the probability of a WWII type mass tactical Airborne assault is little to none. Any opinions? Anyone?

    Best Regards, Danny...
     
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  6. OzinKY

    OzinKY Squier-Meister

    Age:
    56
    467
    Feb 10, 2017
    42701
    Was at Bragg in mid 90s and 06-10 with deployments mixed in. In the 90s we were told to stop singing "Coon skin and alligator hide makes a pair of jump boots just the right size" cadence due to racial crap occurring on and off post. Also couldn't sing "Jesse James said before I die, there's 5 things that I'd like to ride. Bicycle, tricycle, automobile, bow legged woman and a ferris wheel". Sensitivity.
    After a 3 year combat tour of recruiting (dozens of unbelievable stories there) I went to the ROK. Was told we were attending CO2 training. OK, I thought, in the maintenance world we deal with compressed gasses a lot. Found out CO2 stood for Consideration Of Others.
    Airborne mission--as much as I am proud to be a paratrooper (very few in my MOS were) the nature of the beast has changed significantly. The entire military (except spec ops) was years behind the power curve after the Soviet bloc crumbled. We continued training/prepping essentially the same way as before. The exception in the field medical world was we designed smaller slices of field hospitals in various configurations as opposed to a 14 acre full blown 400 bed monstrosity. One could reasonably argue mass tac airborne ops have been wartime obsolete for decades.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017
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  7. Rollmeaway

    Rollmeaway Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    797
    Feb 7, 2016
    Fayetteville, NC
    Well I know they still have a rotational version of what we used to call "DRF" or Division Readiness Force. I remember you had to be ready to report within 2 hours. And they were pretty strict about that. They call it something else today. (can't remember)

    There are probably many reasons why they won't dismantle the 82nd. It is such an American legend. It is truly legendary and a symbol of US military might. I'm sure there are financial reasons also. I hate this saying but the "military industrial complex" would take a hit that would probably affect our economy in a minor but significant enough way. The city of Fayetteville would collapse.

    The reality is that the 82nd Airborne Division is not all Airborne like it was a few decades ago. Financial cuts have taken their toll. You HAD to be Airborne qualified and stay current to be in Division no matter what your MOS. Jumping and jump slots cost money. This is just speculation but I'll bet a third of Division have never been to jump school. I know that if you are not in a line unit, jump slots are few and coveted. There are a lot of "five jump chumps" in Division. Regular jump pay is now an extra $150.00 per month. HALO qualified jumpers get $225 per month. And you can get two hazardous pay bonuses at a time. For instance, I was an aviator and jump qualified. But I could only draw flight pay or jump pay despite the fact that I had to stay jump qualified and participate in Division jump related activities. Today you can draw both. An aviator that is jump qualified, and can wrangle a jump slot, can pull down an extra $300.00 per month just by making one jump every three months. They are adapting and using personnel in more efficient and modern ways while still maintaining the prestige of "The 82nd Airborne Division". A major symbol of American military might.
     
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  8. OzinKY

    OzinKY Squier-Meister

    Age:
    56
    467
    Feb 10, 2017
    42701
    Only one chapter of my autobiography is complete, the 9/11 chapter. I don't plan to try to publish it, just want grandkids and their kids to know a little about me. My parents died when I was young and there is much I never found out about them.
    If anyone has a compelling story about 9/11 or know someone who does, please ask them to contact me. I'd like to compile numerous stories into a book. If it is ever published all proceeds will be split between the USO and Carry The Fallen organizations.
    Shoot me a message with email address if interested in reading my chapter. This will not allow me to attach a Word document. Thanks.
     
  9. Paully

    Paully Squier-holic

    May 29, 2014
    Maine USA
    USS Little Rock and USS Albany. '77 - 81.
    Go Navy!
     
  10. porkpie

    porkpie Squier-Nut

    Age:
    62
    818
    Mar 16, 2015
    Idaho
    1981-1985 U.S. Army Basic at Fort Jackson South Carolina, we got to run in sand, so fun. AIT in San Antonio at Fort Sam Houston, then onto Fort Lewis WA. for the rest of my tour. Had a friend there that was from Coeur d' Alene ID. I said where the hell is that? Moved to Las Vegas after I got out and lived there for 20 years, got laid off and found a job in Coeur d' Alene ID., go figure. Only action when I was in was Grenada. The army made a man out of me and taught me many things that have made me a better person, discipline, values and hard work. God Bless the U.S.A BTW when I was 18 years old I registered for the draft when Vietnam was going on, anyway my random sequence # on my draft card was 004. So I was going, 2 months later Nixon pulled out all the troops and the war was over.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2017
  11. Rollmeaway

    Rollmeaway Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    797
    Feb 7, 2016
    Fayetteville, NC
    Yep, it will either make or break you. Both of my jobs in the Army required extreme attention to detail. With out it, you will die. I can still hear the Black Hats screaming: "what is the first rule to being a Paratrooper"? To which you had to answer: "pay attention to detail Sgt. Airborne!"

    And of course keeping a helicopter flying requires a bit of attention to detail. I brought these ideals back home with me and built some damn reliable running motorcycles, man...

    Danny...
     
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  12. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Squier-Meister

    Age:
    107
    495
    Jan 29, 2017
    ABQ
    Let me just say that the vertans so that have sought help and recieved it. Are far better us that wake up every night in a cold sweat.

    I'm getting tired of the nightly demons. ...

    I love you all....
     
  13. OzinKY

    OzinKY Squier-Meister

    Age:
    56
    467
    Feb 10, 2017
    42701
    There is a wonderful organization called Carry The Fallen based nearby in Shepherdsville, KY. They have events nationwide. They help vets and families with all sorts of issues with a primary goal of preventing/reducing the 22 daily suicides. Yes, there are many such orgs and of course my friends (sic) at the VA.
     
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  14. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    National Service, South Africa 1982-1984, South African Border War.
    Rian, if you ever read this, I miss you and the rest of the guys.
     
  15. jefffam

    jefffam Dr. Squier

    Age:
    60
    Jan 26, 2015
    Five Points, AL
    I never saw combat, so I avoided the ravages many endure of PTSD.

    That being said, I saw first hand the results of those ravages in My late FIL. He was a sniper in the Marines in Korea. While never discussed , based on what descriptions he did give, he was at the Chosen Reservoir. I saw the alcoholism, etc from the indelible images that haunted him almost until the end.

    I feel for all those that suffer. The suicide rate among veterans is totally unacceptable.
     
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  16. Lonn

    Lonn Administrator Staff Member

    Age:
    56
    Dec 19, 2009
    Carmel IN
    Admin Post
    USAF Intel active duty 1981-2002. Spent 12 years working at MAJCOM level for the 4 stars, another 3 years at the National Defense University in DC for the 3 star. Every once in a while I miss it, but not very often. That was another lifetime.
     
  17. bluestella077

    bluestella077 New Member

    Age:
    40
    1
    Mar 24, 2017
    Alabama
     
  18. Ahnlaashock

    Ahnlaashock Squier-holic

    Sep 21, 2014
    St. Louis Area
    At one time, they kept a response force, comprised of all branches, so that if anything kicked, they had someone to throw in the enemies path while they sorted out logistics on getting support to them.
    The people serving in that unit had very short life expectancy.
    I am very glad my time was during the one all too brief time of peace. Amin came close to provoking a response, but sitting with all your gear ready to get on the plane for a couple of days, is as close as I got.

    If you were a paratrooper, and a medic, then you were a 91B20, where I was a B10.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2017
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  19. Rollmeaway

    Rollmeaway Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    797
    Feb 7, 2016
    Fayetteville, NC
    Combat Medics.jpg
     
  20. OzinKY

    OzinKY Squier-Meister

    Age:
    56
    467
    Feb 10, 2017
    42701
    My older son was a combat medic with the 82d and 173d. Although I had worked with thousands of medics in my career it was totally different than in the infantry world. Evidently he was very good from what I gathered from his leadership and battle buddies. He and I were in Iraq at the same time, nearest we got was 20 miles but never linked up. Uber was on strike.
     
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