Truss Rod Problems

Discussion in 'Squier Telecasters' started by SquierTap, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. SquierTap

    SquierTap Squier-Meister

    Age:
    37
    129
    Jul 14, 2018
    Nashville, Tn
    So, even though I've been playin for over 20 years, I've only recently (with the help of the awesome people on this, my first, forum) had the courage to work on and adjust my guitars myself... I just got a nice VB CV 50's Tele, and I was wondering what the best way to check my truss rod is... I know about saddle height, and intonation, but I've always been kinda scared to adjust my truss rod... And all that other stuff ain't gonna make one lick of difference if the truss rod isn't right... I know I need a small amount of relief, but I don't know how to check it... And keep in mind, I don't have an action gauge yet (ordered, but not here yet)...
     
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  2. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Squier-holic

    Age:
    42
    Sep 27, 2014
    Canada
    This is the best method...

     
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  3. AllroyPA

    AllroyPA Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    49
    Dec 14, 2009
    Philly Area
    Here's a sound piece of advice, always loosen a truss rod nut first because you never know if it is already all the way tight
     
  4. dtsreiuqs

    dtsreiuqs Squier-Meister

    374
    Oct 18, 2015
    France
    If you want to check your neck relief with accuracy, the best is to use a notched straitghedge and a set of thickness gauges.

    To have an idea : a relief at 0.30-0.35mm can be considered as a correct value, measured at the 8th box. (0.30 = passes, 0.35 = touches, 0.40 = do not passes), with a 10-52 strings set and an action at 1.75mm treble and 2.00mm bass at the 12th fret (measured with a Stewmac metric action gauge ruler), the guitar being tuned, and standard tuning.

    These are the values that I set up on my 2005 Squier Std Strat and my (now sold) Fender US2012 Std Strat.

    A+!
     
  5. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    Unless it's difficult to play or something seems amiss compared to all the other guitars you've played, why do you think you have to adjust anything?
     
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  6. SoundDesign

    SoundDesign Squier-holic

    There's good information here but it also touches on one of my pet peeves - 2 minute instructional videos that somehow end up being 10 minutes long. You don't even see a guitar here until about 3 and a half minutes in.. :D
     
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  7. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Squier-holic

    Age:
    42
    Sep 27, 2014
    Canada
    It goes slowly for those that are new to setups or apprehensive about making adjustments to their guitars. That's the biggest reason I recommend it. It also explains the reasons for proper relief....
     
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  8. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Squier-holic

    Sep 2, 2015
    NYC
    I thought what he said in the early part was important: (I'm paraphrasing here) "...do not touch the bridge saddles. They didn't move."
     
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  9. Hotrodleroy

    Hotrodleroy Squier-holic

    Dec 7, 2011
    USA
    I didn't watch the video, but the main thing is to make sure you have the correct Allen wrench, a rounded out, or striped truss rod is a lot of grief. Most over seas guitars are metric, but my early Korean lpc is imperial, and it was almost buggered up from past owners.
     
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  10. SquierTap

    SquierTap Squier-Meister

    Age:
    37
    129
    Jul 14, 2018
    Nashville, Tn
    I played a Tele at Sam Ash the other day trying out the Katana 100, and it felt much better than the CV 50's Tele I just got... Which may or may not have sat in a hot delievery truck for 3 days... And like I said, I've only recently (and from this forum) been brave enough to work on my own stuff, so I'm a beginner, who doesn't know a great deal, but I want all my guitars to play and sound as good as possible...
     
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  11. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Squier-holic

    Age:
    42
    Sep 27, 2014
    Canada
    So how did adjusting the relief go? Of course afterward you have to re-do the action/string heights
     
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  12. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    At the low E press behind the 1st fret and then just ahead of the fret of where the neck meets the body. Or you can go with the last fret, either/or.

    this creates the string into a straight edge along that length of the neck. you should see a slight gap that is largest around the 7th fret or so but nothing significant.

    I've been playing since 1977 and own close to 50 guitars. rarely have I ever had to do some truss rod adjustments. once in a while here and there. It's good to know about, but you likely won't have to do it all that often.
     
  13. willhowl

    willhowl Squier-holic

    Age:
    66
    Dec 19, 2011
    Houston Texas
    All good advice above, SquierTap.....so1om's post, just above, echoes most of what I know

    A BIGGIE......Go Slow.....Easy does it.....Loosen before you tighten....Scour You Toob for instructional viddies, there are plenty out there, and most say the same thing...It ain't that hard....always a little scary, but ..........Sometimes, you gotta do it..................willhowl;)
     
  14. Caddy

    Caddy Dr. Squier

    Age:
    70
    Nov 29, 2010
    Indiana
    Fender's specs, as listed in Dan Erlewine's book ' Guitar Player Repair Guide', is .012"at the 7th fret with the first and last frets depressed. I use a capo on the first fret since I only have two hands. Easy to do with an automotive feeler gauge.

    Don't turn more than a 1/4 turn at a time and allow it to settle in. Take your time.
     
  15. Unit11

    Unit11 Squier-Meister

    Age:
    56
    227
    Apr 28, 2018
    Providence, RI
    I wanted to adjust the truss rod on my old Ibanez, to help fix buzz problems. I was scared, too, until I dialed up some web articles that assured me my fears were unfounded. I ended up adjusting it quite a bit. It didn't do much to fix the buzz, but the guitar was never damaged, and Guitar Center was enthused to see it when I brought it in to sell them.
     
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  16. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    Really.. the knowledge of relief to most players isn't for adjusting, per se, but to rule out and go through all the steps of ascertaining the set up. I check relief often, yet rarely make adjustments.

    I get a new guitar home and let it sit for a week or more. I'll play it, i'll tune it, but I let it acclimate. Then i'll change strings, let it sit some more. Then FINALLY after checking relief, tweaking string height and all that, i'll sit down and actually have at it. As @Caddy said. 1/4 turn or so and let it sit a day, then check. Seems slow and tedious and I know some people just band it all out in an afternoon. For me, there's no rush. I'd rather have it settle in slow.

    Interestingly, I have known of people to over adjust it without letting it settle only to have to go back the other way.
     
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  17. jfgesquire

    jfgesquire Squier Talker

    Age:
    51
    38
    May 25, 2018
    Lake View
    With a Squier Tele you aren't talking major money, but it may be to you.

    On older guitars and/or more valuable guitars some luthiers have a jig that puts the relief they want in the neck then tighten up the truss rod nut to match. Dan Erlewine has a video on YouTube, or maybe the Stewmac website, about it.

    I don't remember where I saw it, but I know it's out there, specifically an issue with old Gibsons, but applicable to any instrument with a truss rod.
     
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  18. jtees4

    jtees4 Squier-Meister

    226
    Jun 7, 2012
    NYish
    I was taught this by a touring pro guitar tech, have been doing it this way since 1976. Most people don't do it this way, but it works for me. OK first, you loosen the truss rod just to make sure it works. Then you tighten it all the way until it's tight, NO not over tighten it, just tighten it. Adjust the bridge action. Loosen the truss rod a bit at a time until it feels and plays the way you like it, sometimes that means not loosening it at all, other times you loosen it a lot....every guitar is different. This works wonders on set neck guitars. It may or may not work on bolt on because the necks might not be set right...although it usually works for them too. Occasionally a bolt on will not work right without a shim.
     
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  19. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Squier-holic

    Age:
    48
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    I bought a Schecter one time that had a very pronounced front bow in the neck. I got it for less that the pickups and case cost so I took a chance. When I got it home, I would tighten the truss rod 1/4 turn and then let it set for 24 hrs. I repeated that until the truss rod stopped turning. The neck still had too much relief in it. I thought to myself “oh well, I’ll strip it down, part it out and recoup my money.” I put it on a stand and left if there until I had time to mess with it. About a month later I grabbed it to start tearing in down and found that it now had a slight back bow! Started loosing the truss rod a little bit every couple of days and it settled in right where it should.
     
  20. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    My brother managed a small music store with an even smaller recording studio in a college town. Sometime in the late 80s early 90s, some guy was booking time to record some things, a bass player. He had one of those modern looking high-end Kubecki basses that were popular at the time. I forget the model and i'm too lazy to google.

    But the guy would tune the bass and then tweak the neck EVERY time. My brother (who's been a pro bass player since about 1965) says.. "uh... you may not need to be doing that...." But pretty much left it as "you go, girl!"

    A few years later the guy came in asking if he'd buy the bass or take it in on a trade.. Uh.. nope!
     
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