Top Ten Reasons – Black Bullet Mustang HH Edition

Discussion in 'Squier Offset Guitars' started by Pat V., Jan 23, 2017.

  1. MadCowsPlayStangs

    MadCowsPlayStangs Squier Talker

    Age:
    18
    19
    Jan 30, 2017
    Texas, U.S.A.
    Thanks. Mudhoney, among other bands, is why I fell in love with the mustang in the first place. I was trying to get a shot were you could see Turner's mustang on the poster, but instead it's just a blur.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2017
  2. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    my wife may be onto something. I still need to shape the bridge area of the pickguard to fit the Bullet but here it is just sitting on the guitar and I like it a lot.

    Blue Pearl PG Test .jpg
     
  3. scifilullaby

    scifilullaby Squier-Meister

    Age:
    42
    175
    Jan 2, 2017
    Athens, Greece
    After buying the VM Mustang too, I haven't been playing the Bullet that much.. thinking about selling it.. didn't really connect with it that much. That doesn't mean that it's not a fantastic guitar for the money, and the humbuckers make its sound unique, but it just doesn't do it for me.. This, plus hopefully an Epi LP-100, plus some more money, and I'm going for either the VM or the Deluxe Jazzy. Now, off to search the forum regarding these two in comparison..
     
  4. scifilullaby

    scifilullaby Squier-Meister

    Age:
    42
    175
    Jan 2, 2017
    Athens, Greece
    thinking about turning it into a mutant duo-sonic? :)

     
  5. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    Not exactly since the Duo-Sonic doesn't share the offset body of the Mustang so it's more like a traditional Mustang with a thinner body and hard-tail.
     
  6. MadCowsPlayStangs

    MadCowsPlayStangs Squier Talker

    Age:
    18
    19
    Jan 30, 2017
    Texas, U.S.A.
    I'm really loving this guitar. It's exceptional. It's very aggressive in the bridge position, but it's also very warm and playable in the neck. Most guitars turn into a muddy mess when you flip on the neck pickup, which is especially troublesome for me as I play a lot with my gain at ten, but the bullet mustang doesn't. This really is a nice change from my Memphis, which I can only play in the bridge position if I want to hear the notes.
     
  7. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    I'm copying something that I posted over at the Offset forum about the Bullet Mustang. It was in response to someone posting about how little needs changing on these guitars.

    I totally agree with all of this. For me, the only thing needed with these guitars to put them immediately into service as a gigable guitar is to take the factory strings off and spend fifteen minutes doing a quick polishing of the frets with a 8000 grit polishing cloth before putting a fresh set of quality strings on it and stretching the strings out well.

    Straight out of the box, the electronics are fine, the fret ends are excellent, the pickups are totally usable and quite nice sounding once you figure them out. I really expected to have to change out a lot of things but as it turns out I didn’t have to. This guitar even comes set up exceptionally well and only a tiny turn of the truss rod was needed on one of mine.

    I have changed out the string trees to Graph-Tech because I like them and the tuners to Kluson vintage machines for personal aesthetic reasons and I like changing pickguards because it individualizes the guitar but the stock trees and tuners are perfectly fine once you put a fresh set of strings on it.

    My blue one is getting more of an overhaul because I had to do some routing to accommodate the Mustang slide switches but even that’s a minor job as far as modding goes.

    Here’s a before and after of the rough fret surface (a real common feature of inexpensive guitars these days. At least they are getting the fret ends dressed nicely) My blue one was worse than my black one but as I said, a few minutes with a polishing cloth makes them smooth and shiny.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2017
    radiotech likes this.
  8. KrinkleCuss

    KrinkleCuss Squier Talker

    Age:
    42
    30
    Feb 7, 2017
    US
    Ha! Me too! They blew my mind when that stuff came out. They (and others of the era) really showed how to play simple while writing cool and catchy songs. Superfuzz Bigmuff was the first time I saw a Mustang... instant love.
     
    SquierTap and MadCowsPlayStangs like this.
  9. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    Here’s the Bronze pickguard in natural light. In indoor lighting the Bronze looks quite a bit more Gold than what it looks like here but I can’t say I don’t like it (but it’s amazing how different it looks depending upon the light). I’m leaning towards the blue pickguard but it could easily come down to a coin toss.

    Bronze on Imperial Blue.jpg Coin Toss 001.jpg
     
  10. KrinkleCuss

    KrinkleCuss Squier Talker

    Age:
    42
    30
    Feb 7, 2017
    US
    Have you thought of just white Pearl? I know those are kind of standard but I think it would look pretty sweet.
     
  11. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    Yes. I think White Pearl looks great on both black and blue Mustangs. It's one of seven pickguards that I have on hand to try. Someone on OSG posted this one with a Cream Pearl guard on black. I think it looks great!
     
  12. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    Here's how she looks right now and I gotta say I love the looks and the sound of the single coils with sliders. Lots of sound combinations!

    Squier Bullet Mustang - Blue on Blue Phase I.jpg
     
  13. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
  14. grizmit

    grizmit Squier-holic

    Jan 25, 2015
    I think that looks great! Maybe I'm just going through a phase because I just did the red tort on red CAR JM, but I really dig the monochromatic color scheme.
     
  15. MadCowsPlayStangs

    MadCowsPlayStangs Squier Talker

    Age:
    18
    19
    Jan 30, 2017
    Texas, U.S.A.
    It looks amazing! What kind of PUPs does it have, vintage mustangs, or something else?
     
    Pat V. likes this.
  16. so1om

    so1om Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    52
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    I'm not following what you are saying here. If we speak "traditionally", the musicmaster and duo were both redesigned as the mustang joined back in 1964.

    or are you referring to current duo/mustang offerings.
     
    Pat V. likes this.
  17. so1om

    so1om Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    52
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    This is the preferred "in my mind" switching option. I love all the passive tones. For some reason I don't mind toggles on Gibsons, et al. But on Fenders it always looks like they are ready to be snapped right off. Just a perception.

    (though my mid 90s MIM Fender Duo switch did fall apart. I spent a day (in the nice quiet take my time kinda way) disassembling it and reassembling it.)
     
    Pat V. likes this.
  18. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    No, I was referring to the original Duo-Sonic shape (first and second version), not the re-designed Duo-Sonic II that was part of the 1964 make-over. It's just semantics, I always considered the Duo-Sonic II as a hard-tail Mustang instead of a Duo-Sonic with an offset body.

    [​IMG]
     
    so1om likes this.
  19. so1om

    so1om Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    52
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago

    RIGHT! I agree with that
     
    Pat V. likes this.
  20. Pat V.

    Pat V. Squier-holic

    Nov 21, 2014
    North America
    I always felt the body shape was the real designator and not the bridge/switching changes.
     
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