Squier Classic Vibe duo sonic: wood body type ...

Discussion in 'Squier Duo-Sonic & Jagmaster' started by wfrcrd, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. wfrcrd

    wfrcrd Squier Talker

    Age:
    49
    4
    Jan 4, 2019
    italy
    Hi to everyone I'm new here and sorry for my bad english.
    I'd like to try a short scale guitar, so I was thinking to buy an used duo sonic squier (desert sand) or a new MIM duo sonic or mustang.
    The body of the new MIM duo sonic and mustang are made of alder, the Squier duo sonic are made of basswood so I prefer the first one but....

    "They're made of 5~7 pieces of wood glued side by side, with a thin veneer on the top and bottom. The veneer lets them use pieces with knots, splits, and wane."

    This is what I've read about the MIM alder bodies, so I'm a bit confused.
    Are the basswood body of the squire duo sonic made in a better way? Are they better than the MIM ?
    Thank you in advice.
     
  2. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    39
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    Hello welcome!

    I'm of the opinion that body wood on a solid body electric guitar does not matter enough tone-wise to 'fret' over. Turn it up and play on. I like alder to build because I don't need to grain fill. Haven't worked with basswood but the grain isn't as nice and it dents easily.

    Where did you get that quote? There is nothing bad about gluing blocks together to make a guitar, nearly all makers do this. Adding a veneer to a glued multi-piece body is a costly extra step. This is only done for transparent and sunburst finishes that show off the wood grain. Of the dozens of VM Offset guitars and basses I've seen and played, I can tell you that most use 3-piece basswood blocks with no veneer.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
  3. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    43
    Sep 27, 2014
    Canada
    That is how they USED TO make Fender Mexico bodies....before the 2010s.....

    I would not be worried about body wood.....just buy which one you like more
     
  4. wfrcrd

    wfrcrd Squier Talker

    Age:
    49
    4
    Jan 4, 2019
    italy
    I think you are not the only one to be surprised to find veneer on cheap giutar, look here :


    This is a squier mustang.
    I'm in a hurry , I will reply tomorrow, thank you for now ....
     
  5. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    39
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    Not surprised at all, it's a cosmetic cap like any kind of veneer. Why that's done on a solid colored guitar beats me given the alternatives to deal with knots and cracks, but it must make $$ sense to the manufacturer. Either way, I'd get the guitar you like, based on your own personal preferences and values.
     
  6. archetype

    archetype Squier-Nut

    923
    Oct 24, 2017
    Williamsville, NY USA
    Veneer, front and back over a multi-piece core, saves production time. The veneer hides all the glued joints so there's no time spent on fill and sanding to make sure the joints don't show through the finish. Doesn't matter if it's a solid or transparent finish on the body. Typically, the transparent finished bodies get a better-looking veneer.
     
    so1om likes this.
  7. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    39
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    I get that low grade veneers make money sense to various manufacturers through the video, even if they aren’t used consistently. Veneers are cosmetic, even if it’s to minimize grain and crack filling on a solid color body. Clearly some inexpensive guitars get a veneer like the later Epi G400 in cherry, and other don’t, like the VM Jazzmaster sunbursts. It probably makes no sense to change the production line at that price point either, so it won’t be a surprise if a white SG is veneered underneath. It’s also note worthy that the more expensive guitar lacks a veneer, while the cheaper one gets a mahogany cap.
     
  8. wfrcrd

    wfrcrd Squier Talker

    Age:
    49
    4
    Jan 4, 2019
    italy
    I've heard from a guy who owned a MIM the fact about the veneer and it was a big suprise to me.
    So I googled a bit and I've found that quote on a strat forum , if I remember well.
    The point to it's not the veneer pro-cons, but the fact that veneer seems to be used to cover the poor wood behind it.
    I mean: was the good old vintage fender's made with more than 3 pieces (and the veneer to cover tha glued parts)?
    How much it cost a "one piece" solid alder body instead of a 5 pieces glued together?
    So my mistake maybe was to think that the fender MIM body was made the same ways than older fender bodies (I mean 2 -3 pieces max) instead of 5-7 pieces glued and so on.
    It changes the sound of the guitar?
    I don't want to open a debate about tonewood , but i'ts a fact tha one piece body cost much more than a 5 piece, so why should some guitar has a 1 piece body if there's no reason to have it?
    That said I'd like to know (but maybe i'm offtopic here) if the actual MIM duo sonic or mustang are made of multi pieces (5-7) alder body , or just 2-3 , because to me a multipiece don't worth the money. Is something changed after 2010?
    And I'd like to know too if the basswood bodies of the squier duo sonic are multipieces glued or a 2-3 pieces, because I like the squier CV duo sonic , but I don't like basswood , and I don't want to buy a multi piece basswood guitar, even if it's pretty and cheap.
    Thank you !
     
  9. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    39
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    I imagine that a one piece body cost more because it requires a larger piece of wood with no flaws. Gluing a bunch of blocks together and veneering allows to use low grade wood, with a cosmetic veneer to help final finishing. The appeal of a one piece is also mental: people tend to think that one or two blocks of wood sound better than chipboard, but nobody can actually tell the difference. Those that can live a cursed life, I'm sure:) Since the appeal is mental for MANY guitar players, that means the market has been driven by the demand. Weird, but you can't change decades of 'tone theory' with a couple years of repetitive forum and youtube demonstrations. It will take time, but people are coming around :D

    If you are worried about the number of pieces of glued wood on your guitar, you might never know unless you refinish it. Just because something was said or found out and posted on the internet, doesn't make it so for every MIM Fender or Squier guitar out there. When I get my Duo Sonic next week or so, I'll tell you how many pieces of wood if I can. Probably 3 like most of the MIM JMs, Teles, and Strats I've owned or repaired. This will only help a little bit..
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
    wfrcrd and so1om like this.
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