SEEKING THE DEFINITIVE ANSWER ON THE VM JAGUAR BRIDGE ISSUE

Discussion in 'Squier Offset Guitars' started by madmodder, May 8, 2016.

  1. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    38
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    Very interesting, Flyer91. I've heard about Gibbons use of EQ and preference for thin string gauges. I agree, do what you want with your guitar.

    All this talk about bridges, design, intention and execution is supposed to help those looking for their own aesthetic and preference. For example, I now prefer 10s on almost all my guitars but run 11s on shorter scales and 1 of my Jazzmasters. I like offset trems, its one of my favorite to play with--and I like both designs (floating/pinned bridge). I use Mastery, Staytrem, and stock JM bridges--they all work well for their intended design. I dislike Buzzstops and TOMs with vibrato units--mainly because of my experience with the Bigsby B5 and Gretsch bridges (solid rocking bars and high-quality rollers are all I use). Besides the Buzzstop 'killing' all that smooth trem action, I dislike the appearance. I'm happy with my setups and prefs, they suit ME well, but it's not the same for everyone.

    Unlike Gibbons, Flyer91, or the OP, I don't like 9s in any context, because I have a heavy picking hand and also fingerpick with a thumb pick. My fingers will snap the string out of tune at speed with 9 gauge. It's also crazy to me about EQ-ing so many guitars to the same curve--I play different guitars for different sounds, traditional or not. I want spikey treble from 1 meg pots sometimes, or muted underwater sounds from a rolled back tone control. I'm not annoyed to adjust my amp tone controls either. But thats the point, we can do whatever we want with our gear and that is OK. I rather focus on pragmatic solutions and the pluses/minuses of each to help other players for their given needs. In other words, just make it your own and then play it. I don't think it would kill ya' if you put 10s on that Jag either! :D
     
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  2. I haven't tried 10's, I went right to the recommended 11's and that cured all the issues I was having with the Jag not holding tune/intonation.
    But I also use really light picks (Fender thins and Tortex .60s, etc).

    You don't have to use the system I described to tune to the same sound on all guitars.
    Although you certainly can do that (as Billy's Tech explains) I use it as a baseline to help make any guitar sound the way I want it to sound, by matching the EQ for it to 'any' source's spectrum when playing the same chord, and to set the gain at unity for the type of guitars and other devices being used in any given equipment configuration.

    The Ultracurve has 64 memory locations that can store those different EQ's for rapid recall.
    It's like having 64 intelligent/diagnostic EQ pedals ... if that makes better sense.
    They don't all have to do the same thing.

    I might have some slippery 10's around here, if I do I'll give them a try before I do (if I even do) the mods to my Jag, just to see if it works for me.
    Like I said ... I use thin picks and have always liked E.B. S.S. 9's.
    They just feel right to me.
    I do have a bunch of Rev Willy Mexican Lottery 7's that I got by mistake, and yup ... they are just way too light on anything I own, but I get along well with 9's going back as far the the late 1960's/early 70's when (as a drummer) I got schooled by some really good guitar playing bandmates, and never saw a need to change ... until the Jag. :)
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2016
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  3. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    38
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    I did the 9's thing back in the 90s, just because I read my favorite band was using them with 1.0mm tortex. Worked nice for the high-gain rock stuff, no so much for everything else. I couldn't dig in but I could bend easily--but just not for me. I hear you about the EQ thing--useful for people who run unity gain and lots of effects, but its different strokes for different folks and all that...
     
    Flyer91 likes this.
  4. Scarabeus

    Scarabeus Squier Talker

    71
    Sep 15, 2015
    Get a staytrem.
    It works. I use it and it's like candyrainbowmagic.
    If it's good enough for Johnny Marr it's good enough for you!
     
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  5. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    38
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    But Johnny Marr just chirps away on inverted and extended chords -- his light handed touch couldn't possibly pop strings :p
     
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  6. cj777

    cj777 Squier Talker

    Age:
    41
    6
    Jan 8, 2017
    Italy
    Im experiencing a very similar problem with my VM Jag, though im using 09s.

    How did you manage to find shorter springs ?
     
  7. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago

    You just take the spring and cut it.
     
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  8. surfrodguitar

    surfrodguitar Squier-holic

    Aug 4, 2016
    Laguna Niguel
    I cut the springs on mine as well and picked up shorter saddle intonation screws from the hardware store.
     
    cj777 likes this.
  9. cj777

    cj777 Squier Talker

    Age:
    41
    6
    Jan 8, 2017
    Italy
    Ok so it seems it is a rather common problem !! :)
     
  10. TheKurdtz

    TheKurdtz Squier-holic

    Age:
    19
    Sep 13, 2017
    Holland
    i have a mustang bridge in my VM jag, it has the radius cut to spec for the jag, i have had zero problems with it so far
     
  11. Jmv668

    Jmv668 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    39
    535
    Feb 21, 2017
    Chile
    What issue? You only need a good setup and 10s or 11s strings.
     
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  12. Fret Cheese

    Fret Cheese Squier-Meister

    227
    Sep 10, 2016
    Bordeaux
    My 2015 VM is fine- all stock with 10's.
    no rattles, intonates and holds tune when using the trem.
    From reading the Internet you'd think that all jags need to be extensively modded (mostly from people who play other models and don't know how to set up a guitar - boom!
     
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  13. Ralph124C41

    Ralph124C41 Squier-holic

    Feb 10, 2016
    Exactly. Mine has 11s on it and I think that size complements the shorter scale.
     
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  14. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    Mine has been fine with 9s.
     
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  15. Big George

    Big George Squier Talker

    18
    Jan 11, 2018
    North Carolina
    I finally took a long look at the standard bridge on my VM Jazzmaster today, same bridge as the Jaguar, and didn't like how the saddles looked or where they were, decided to loosen everything and then just eyeball it to where I thought they should be and what looked proper to me. Holy smokes, it worked! I'm still playing the jazzy just to see if what I'm hearing is really what I think I'm hearing, but next up is to locktite everything and then just leave it alone.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
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  16. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    50
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    Sometimes hitting the reset button helps. Start fresh and.... success!
     
  17. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    There are so many areas in life where we today are told that we have to "do something." The offset bridge and trem is one such.

    A better starting point to me is just use it and see if YOU have a problem. And if you do then look for a minimalist solution to that specific problem.

    How often do we see well meaning people join us and in their opening post they tell us that they just got such and such a guitar (or are about to) and then list all the changes they have been told they need to make.

    This ties in with @so1om 's comment elsewhere that he just loves his Bullet. Years of playing has given him the confidence to just say that. No need to do this or that. It works for him and that's it.

    I think that same confidence can be encouraged towards the offset bridge issues.

    Yes, some due to specific playing technique may have an issue. But look how many here simply do not.

    Our social system is one based on buying and selling more than on simply enjoying what we do. And some good comes from that. New and sometimes innovative ideas that improves this and that. But the downside is that stuff that is really plenty good enough is often chucked aside because we think we have to have the "new" and the "better."

    Its hardly original, but I say just play the damned thing!

    (and have fun doing so)

    :)

    -don
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2018
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  18. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Squier-holic

    Age:
    38
    Oct 5, 2014
    Gilbert, AZ
    R.I.P. Flyer91
     
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  19. Garry Nathan

    Garry Nathan Squier Talker

    Age:
    55
    15
    May 21, 2018
    Essex United Kingdom
    Do not fret, a TOM bridge will have the wrong radius, what is more viable is a Fender Adjust-O-Matic bridge like on the J Mascis Jazzmaster but check out your radius I think the J Mascis AOM radius is 9.5 ? Personally I found the best, ultimate, no issue and pragmatic solution was a Staytrem bridge they come in 2 sized radius [ covered ] but are not cheap 65 pounds sterling probably 100 dollars with shipping but in my opinion the ultimate, solid solution, but your guitar neck may need shimming and I found it best to pack out the bridge posts with insulating tape [ not floating ] and lubricate the saddles and nut. The Staytrem has a set radius, it is not cheap, but does a solid job, NO issues. My JM now plays like a dream. Check out YouTube.
     
  20. vjhn

    vjhn Squier Talker

    Age:
    28
    12
    Sep 19, 2017
    Norway
    Bear with me, I am not an English native speaker.


    When I bought the VM Jaguar, it came with .9's. The strings would constantly jump off the saddles, and the bridge was rattling. So, after searching around the web, I decied to string the guitar with .11's. However, I did not like the thick strings, while I do use 10's and 10,5’s on my other guitars, the top strings felt too thick for the width/height of the neck, and the width of the frets. I therefore switched to .10, which felt better – but next time I am changing strings, I am considering trying .10,5's. However, with the .10's, the top strings would still move around the stock saddles from time to time, and the rattling was still present. To combat these peoblems I did a couple of things:

    1) I raised the base of the neck with a shim that covered the whole neck-pocket, on top of that, I put another shim that only covered around 1/3 to 1/4 of the neck-pocket, which I put in the pocket socket close to the body/neck pick-up.

    2) I then replaced the stock saddles with barrel-style saddles with individual screws for height adjustments, I had to file some of the saddles to better fit the top strings though.

    The reasons for 1 and 2 were to allow for a higher bridge-height and a straighter neck, increasing the break-angle of the strings over the bridge/saddles – increasing string tension. This downward force would reduce the rattling while keeping the strings in place.

    Then, to my best efforts, I set everything up before applying transparent nail-polish to lock every saddle-screws and bridge-high-adjustment screws in place. This would enable the bridge to float and fix the rattling.

    However, I got this weird loud over-tones that I did not like, possibly due to the nail-polish. Therefore, behind the bridge, under the strings, I have put a piece of clothing to mute the weird over-tones a bit. I can still hear the over-tones, but they are not weird anymore.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018