Scuttle Buttin' Bass Tabs... Holy Sh...annon..

Discussion in 'Music, Theory, Tab and Such' started by Bassman96, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. Bassman96

    Bassman96 Squier-holic

    Age:
    41
    Nov 13, 2010
    Oak Harbor, WA
    And just because it's cool to be able to see the transformation. This is his Jazz Bass he calls his #1 and is seen in that early Johnny Winter video.

    It had weathered just about as well as Stevie's #1 had.
    e2694aeca1cd127aed172ad23212423b.jpg
    shannon.jpg
     
  2. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    When I saw Johnny Winter in the late '80s at the Warner Theater in DC, he had Jon Paris on bass and Tom Compton on drums. That was a killer threesome too. Paris played top level bass, but could also play guitar very well. On one of Winter's live albums he and Paris swapped instruments for a couple songs and both did an amazing job.

    To me, that was Winter's peak. He had all the experience of a couple decades of performing, and hadn't succumbed to the problems of prescription drugs, broken hips, and horrible management yet. He kept his skinny fingers moving at blinding speed for 2 hours straight that night.
     
  3. stratfreak

    stratfreak Squier-Meister

    Age:
    53
    112
    May 1, 2019
    Austin, TX
    I honestly never realized back in the day how great Johnny was as a blues guitarist. I think it's because he was marketed as a hard rock guitarist when I was growing up in the 70s. I think his management really wanted him to be the successor to Jimi Hendrix. It's kind of unfortunate that economics made that the much more attractive option than having him remain a blues guitarist.

    Interesting facts: Jimi Hendrix was one of the highest-paid rock performers in the late 60s. And Johnny Winter signed the largest recording contract at that time.

    "In 1968, Jimmy Page’s blues-rock outfit Led Zeppelin inked a contract with Atlantic Records for a then-record advance of $200,000. As they say, however, records are meant to be broken and just one year later, Winter obliterated the old mark when he inked a deal with Columbia to the tune of $600,000."
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
  4. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    Exactly my problem. It took me until about 1980 to have any idea of what JW actually preferred to play. His career was held back financially because he decided he was going to play what he liked to play, not what would make the most money.
     
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  5. stratfreak

    stratfreak Squier-Meister

    Age:
    53
    112
    May 1, 2019
    Austin, TX
    Best blues slide player I've ever heard.


    "White albino Texan given the gift of blues mastery. Who says god doesn't have a sense of humour?"
     
  6. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    There's that excellent 3-piece band: Winter, Paris, Compton. And probably recorded right around when I saw them.

    winter-paris-compton.jpg
     
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  7. oneLOCOman

    oneLOCOman Squier-holic

    Age:
    65
    Oct 2, 2018
    Missouri
    My Favorite bass player. Maybe a little too old school for ya'll. I just love this guy.
     
  8. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    Check out Carol Kaye and Mel Torme. She has a funny story about doing this take, playing lead bass to wake up the drummer for the real take, and the sound guy saying that was the one they were using.

     
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  9. Bassman96

    Bassman96 Squier-holic

    Age:
    41
    Nov 13, 2010
    Oak Harbor, WA
    I really enjoyed that. Thanks for sharing. Has a nice shuffley groove to it!
     
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  10. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    I was completely surprised only a couple years ago when I found out that she played bass on the famous album version of Joe Cocker doing Feeling' Alright. I has always assumed it was one of the regulars in that circle like Carl Radle.
     
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  11. oneLOCOman

    oneLOCOman Squier-holic

    Age:
    65
    Oct 2, 2018
    Missouri
    Oh Carol Kaye is freaking awesome she played bass on the Beach Boys "Pet Sounds".
     
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  12. Bob the builder

    Bob the builder Squier-Meister

    Age:
    59
    246
    Feb 25, 2017
    Rhode Island USA
    Smokin'
     
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  13. stratfreak

    stratfreak Squier-Meister

    Age:
    53
    112
    May 1, 2019
    Austin, TX
    she played bass on half the hit songs of the 60s. Or maybe more than half!
     
  14. Bassman96

    Bassman96 Squier-holic

    Age:
    41
    Nov 13, 2010
    Oak Harbor, WA
    Back to the original song real quick. I created a pdf with the tabs in it. My brain can't keep up with the video so it's easier to have them printed out in front of me (I know I'm not alone in that)
     

    Attached Files:

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  15. stratfreak

    stratfreak Squier-Meister

    Age:
    53
    112
    May 1, 2019
    Austin, TX
    thank you! I'll definitely be giving that a shot.
     
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  16. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    I just found this... check out the instrument swap at 6:40!

     
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  17. wonkenstein

    wonkenstein Squier-holic

    Feb 3, 2017
    NH
    I keep going back past the 70s, into the 60s, 50s, 40s and earlier to learn new stuff....... seems like there isn't anything I can play that hasn't been played before ;-) I started gigging around '67 and was fortunate to be playing with better, more experienced players. What this thread makes ring true for me begins right here with Tommy Shannon's work backing up Stevie Ray - for every great vocalist/soloist up front in the spotlight you will always find a killer rhythm section driving/supporting the songs, controlling and building the dynamics. You really get a sense of knowing how good some of those guitar players are because of the way they rely on the rhythm section all the time. Those great bands were breathing together! The bass player and the drummer - when those two are locked in that becomes a musical power unto itself - the really good players in the spotlight respond directly to this force because this is what makes or breaks the performance. Going back to Stevie Ray.... he also knew what it was like to be a back line player. Some of the playing he did behind David Bowie was nothing short of brilliant.
     
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  18. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    I had some guys over for a basement jam about 40 years ago. The drummer and bass player were pros. That's when I learned that if you have a really good rhythm section you really don't have to be very good on guitar for the music to sound good. When I screwed up I could just stop, and the bass would take over the lead. I'm glad I had the chance to find out about that early on.
     
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  19. wonkenstein

    wonkenstein Squier-holic

    Feb 3, 2017
    NH
    I don't know about you guys, but I think great bass players are born. Take a listen to any of your favorite go-to bass players and you get the impression that it's perfectly normal for them to just function at a super high level of awareness.
     
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