Rosewood question

Discussion in 'Squier Stratocasters' started by Led Pants, Jan 13, 2020.

  1. Led Pants

    Led Pants Squier Talker

    Age:
    51
    13
    Jan 4, 2013
    Iowa
    I'm just curious as it really means nothing, but do any of you Squier history gurus know what type of rosewood my Squier II (gold) Strat has? It is serial no. N019428. I swear I got it in 1989 but the serial says otherwise...That puts it from India, right? Or Corona? If India the rosewood would be some Asian 'rosewood' probably, if Corona would it be Brazilian? Or Brazilian imported to India? It is really a dark rosewood, not at all what I see on guitars today. To me it does look Brazilian, but again just curious, it has no real bearing at all on this guitar.
    Thoughts?
     
    wonkenstein likes this.
  2. Led Pants

    Led Pants Squier Talker

    Age:
    51
    13
    Jan 4, 2013
    Iowa
    Yeah but I've also read here and other places that year had left-overs that were done in Corona, so...
    The question is still out there about the rosewood fingerboard though.
     
  3. Ace38

    Ace38 Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Jul 19, 2016
    Tulsa, OK.
    To the best of my knowledge, all Squiers that were made in the USA (well, assembled..I'll get to that) were regular Squiers. The Squier II is an even more budget instrument made of plywood bodies and lesser quality electronics and hardware. All US made Squiers were assembled in the US from imported parts.

    You don't honestly believe FMIC would sell US made and sourced parts for Squier prices do you????? I'm stunned how many think that's the case.

    So Fender instruments stopped using Brazilian rosewood after the 1960's, but how far after is kinda unclear. Any US guitar made under the FMIC banner as opposed to CBS would have been Indian rosewood.

    Where does your guitar say its made? Should say right by the serial number.
     
    drewcp likes this.
  4. wonkenstein

    wonkenstein Squier-holic

    Feb 3, 2017
    NH
    It's most likely Indian rosewood, actually from India, but as far as Brazilian rosewood goes, the international CITES treaty banned the import/export of Brazilian rosewood in 1965. If a company already had the Brazilian in stock along with the documentation to prove it, they could build instruments with the Brazilian they already owned and sell them. It's a long shot but it's not impossible that you've got a Brazilian fret board..... characteristically dark reddish brown with dark chocolate black streaks if it was harvested mid 60s.... the last Martin made with Brazilian, a D 45, came out of the factory in 1969. Fender, Gibson and Guild also had some inventory left, too.
    Martin still has some stocked and locked away for custom builds and limited releases. You could be a very lucky dude.... it's entirely possible. Serial numbers aside all the companies would use what they had on hand.
     
    Davis Sharp and drewcp like this.
  5. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    43
    Sep 27, 2014
    North Pole
    a Squier II was never made in the USA....it's Korean or Indian and it would say so on it which one it was......

    there is no way of knowing what species of rosewood you have.....if it were brazilian, it would not raise value anyway.....
     
    wonkenstein likes this.
  6. Led Pants

    Led Pants Squier Talker

    Age:
    51
    13
    Jan 4, 2013
    Iowa
    Well I feel like a fool now. I seriously feel I've wasted everyone's time with this thread! I didn't do research AT ALL into the CITES timeline. The 60's? I seriously thought this was a 'Save The Rainforest" thing from a few years ago!!..Been stuck reading the Les Paul forums about Brazilian rosewood on Historics. No idea. Sorry. I'm really rather embarrassed! Forget the Brazilian thing!!
    As for the "Where was it made? It will say by the serial number"...
    Not!
    I remember when I bought it. Mine has a sticker at the base of the neck near the pocket with that serial number, nothing else. Nothing on the headstock (see my avatar). There were some on the wall that had a "Made in India" on the headstock, and I remember thinking "I don't want one of those. Fender is American!" I know I know...no internet, no guitar instruction, no mentor to learn me the ways of 6 strings...A couple months after I bought it they ALL said "Made in India" on the headstock and I thought I was lucky to have an American-made Squier. Again, I had no idea of the realities of manufacturing. The 80's...Reagan...Rambo....Lee Iacocca and all that.
    I have had the neck off more than once, but I really don't remember what's there. A letter stamp maybe, and something else or 2. I do know the inspection sticker (yellow/white round one) that was on the neck plate I personally moved to the underside of the pickguard to keep it from wearing away, maybe 10+ years ago. Or did I toss it? Damn.
    Again, really sorry for wasting everyone's time on the rosewood thing.
     
    Mr Bones and wonkenstein like this.
  7. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Age:
    43
    Sep 27, 2014
    North Pole
    In that case, it's super easy to tell - if you show a photo. The Indian made ones had a horrible looking Fender copy headstock with a weird shaped ball end and PREGNANT look.....

    No Squier II was ever USA made....
     
    wonkenstein and drewcp like this.
  8. Shaytan

    Shaytan Squier-Nut

    Age:
    22
    681
    Apr 10, 2018
    Lisbon, Portugal
    I have an unpopular belief that in budget guitars, the types of wood companies claimed to use were to be taking with a grain of salt. Epiphone has always claimed to use mahogany, yet chips in the paint reveal a very clear-colored wood underneath, nothing like the mahogany we're used to. The reason, simply put, is that mahogany is a very large general category of woods, varying a lot between different species - or, in other words, it has little to do with, say, the mahogany Gibson uses.

    Same applies to Rosewood. It's no big surprise many companies just stained pieces of wood with similar grain, either of less desirable Indian Rosewood with uneven coloring, or something different altogether. To justify my claims, I simply have an hard time believing my SE's fretboard to be actually made out of rosewood, given it looks nothing like the wood in none of the guitars I've owned and played; while the grain and porosity looks similar, both my Jackson and my PRS have notably differently colored woods. Moreover, there are small chips around the nut slot revealing a lighter wood underneath.

    Overall, if there's a positive legacy in the guitar industry of the CITES regulation (FIY, now excluding musical instruments), was the indirect enforcement of companies to clearly state what types of wood they've actually used.
     
    wonkenstein likes this.
  9. wonkenstein

    wonkenstein Squier-holic

    Feb 3, 2017
    NH
    Yeah, the subject of woods used, the species, the variations in each species depending on which country the wood was harvested from..... big gray areas for all of us who like wooden instruments. At the time of the CITIES treaty it was common knowledge that the majority of the wood poaching and smuggling of Brazilian rosewood was tied to furniture factories worldwide. Musical instrument makers were (and still are) the smallest part of the overall picture but because of the bigger ecological impact everybody that uses wood for raw material now has to tow the line. I think guitar manufacturers are probably more under the microscope than any other industry. The fact that today's instrument makers are more responsible about available supplies as well as actively investing in sustainable, alternative solutions is really down played.
     
    Mr Bones likes this.
  10. Led Pants

    Led Pants Squier Talker

    Age:
    51
    13
    Jan 4, 2013
    Iowa
  11. Ace38

    Ace38 Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Jul 19, 2016
    Tulsa, OK.
    Made in India.
     
    Mr Bones, drewcp and wonkenstein like this.
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