Pre-2012/13 Gibsons better?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by Stratlover84, May 14, 2019.

  1. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    So I am shopping for an SG... looking at the batwing Faded models with open coil humbuckers (will probably cover them up later with nickel covers) but Sweetwater also has available some new old stock (2010 and 2011) SG Standard Tribute models and even the Sweetwater representative said that these old stock have bone nuts, better bridges/woods etc. etc. Is this is true?

    I do remember there being a change in the woods due to environmental protection laws a few years back, but never paid enough attention or had enough of an active interest to follow up with Gibsons quality control over the past few years.

    Can anyone shed any light on this topic? I will do some of my own research, but I'm really interested in this one right now, a new 2010 SG Standard Tribute in Vintage Cherry Satin:

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Squier-Nut

    Age:
    108
    779
    Jan 29, 2017
    ABQ
    I currently have Gibson’s from 1991 thru 2018.

    I don’t have a bad one in the bunch.


    Internet speculation by dipshits that regurgitate what they heard and haven’t experienced is rampant on the interwebs....


    Get the one you get the best deal on. Sweetwater is trying to sell you something, so take that for what it’s worth.
     
  3. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    I'll take those years of experience as a good sign. So it's not true about the woods used for fretboards and the nuts, and hardware? I don't want to give in to any of that but at the same time, I do want to take any factors into consideration. I did wonder why Sweetwater has a lot of 2010 models and I figure it is because those models were specifically made for Sweetwater? I really don't know what to think at this moment, but my budget is no more than $1200 and I want something decent!
     
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  4. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Squier-Nut

    Age:
    108
    779
    Jan 29, 2017
    ABQ
    For $1200 you can get much better than decent.

    I don’t know what sweetwater is asking but $600-650 should be about right for those.

    No binding, no trapezoid inlays, and no pickup covers is a $799 guitar on a good day.
     
  5. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Squier-Nut

    Age:
    108
    779
    Jan 29, 2017
    ABQ
    I just got this 2018 special with minis delivered Thursday.

    $650 shipped brand friggin’ new. Had the soft case, (better than a gig bag)

    GC had these on sale for $699, and I had another big name vendor beat that.

    [​IMG]

    Here is most of her sisters...

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY

    I also love the natural look. Where do you suggest I look then? I just know I want one of the faded models and I'd like it new, not an open box, or floor/demo model.
     
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  7. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Squier-Nut

    Age:
    108
    779
    Jan 29, 2017
    ABQ
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  8. archetype

    archetype Squier-Nut

    710
    Oct 24, 2017
    Williamsville, NY USA
    Gibson, itself, has a deep inventory of guitars that didn’t sell or were overproduced. This inventory goes back through several “model years.” They usually wholesale these cheap to American Musical Supply, who retails them for cheap until they’re gone. Less often, they go through GC/MF. Apparently Sweetwater is now in the game.

    Don’t worry about the year. Just buy on features, price, and which seller will give you the best customer service.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  9. daan

    daan Squier-holic

    Oct 21, 2013
    Twin Cities
    The production year just doesn’t matter. Get what speaks to you, either because of the deal you got, or how it feels in your arms. I owned a 91 LP that was great, and very nearly bought a SGJ (‘14? ‘15? Something like that) that played so nice it felt like it was a part of me (but I just couldn’t come up with the $)
    Hands down, THE best sounding Gibson I’ve ever heard, was a 335 with those “Gibson” embossed pickups, so 71-72, or deep in the “Norlin Dark Ages” :) That thing just sounded like God Himself ran the routers that day, and the guy playing it at the store just handed his wallet over to the sales guy and told him, “I don’t care how much it is, or how long I’ll be in the dog house, I can’t leave here without this guitar.” I mean, people stopped what they were doing to listen to this guy play, it was that good...
    So yeah, don’t worry about WHEN your guitar was made, just enjoy it and play it!
     
  10. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    Since I have to buy sight unseen online, I prefer to go with the safety and guarantee that Sweetwater offers, not to mention I can choose the particular model from a group of 4 guitars.

    I just can't wait to have my hands on a Gibson SG that is NEW. Also, are the 490R and 490T really Alnico II pickups? I could have sworn reading they were Alnico V... :confused:
     
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  11. surfrodguitar

    surfrodguitar Squier-holic

    Aug 4, 2016
    Laguna Niguel
    I had that same faded SG 2002 or 2003 something like that and through my Ac30 it sounded so very good! Same pickups too and they sound awesome!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  12. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    How do you like 24 frets rather than 22? Mini humbuckers, are they alnico magnets, and if so what kind? The Special just looks like so much more guitar for the money than the Faded.

    Never owned or played a mini humbucker guitar, but they look great covered in chrome, plus the inlays... only thing I can't get past is the 24 frets, go figure. I had a tough playing Schecter Exotic with 24 frets and I vowed to never go near another 24 fret guitar, but please, someone convince me that it is apple and oranges and that I should go for the Special!

    I play everything from blues to drop D tuning high gain stuff. This is why I departed from Strats and Teles and am at the doorstep of purchasing a Gibson.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
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  13. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Count me in as another person who thinks the "good years, bad years" talk mostly blarney.

    I presently have 4 Gibsons. These date from 1980 thru 2015. Two are upper echelon models. one is (quite literally) a "standard" (the '88 Les Paul) and one is a relative 'cheapie." Different eras. Different models. Different price ranges.

    The one thing they share is playing. sounding and looking great.

    Yes, even the 2015 left-over "cheapie."

    Up until recently the Gibsons that got the most flack were those made during the so-called "Norlin period." Yet of all my Gibsons it is a Norlin era one that most loudly screams excellence.


    ES-Artist 1 (1).jpg ES-Artist Headstock.jpg

    The (2004?) SG Supreme is the only one that shows some lessening of the high order of craftsmanship one could and would expect from a Gibson, but this really on in one aspect -- the cutting in of the inlays which was rather crude and then filled in. But other than that is is absolutely superb. Gorgeous wood and finish. Flawless neck. It deserves its name -- a "Supreme." It is just that in ways far more important than the closeness of the inlay cuts.


    Gibson SG Supreme.jpg Gibsin 2002 SG Supreme Body.jpg


    So, yes, look for the features and price that work for you.

    Gibsons, for all the noise, are wonderful instruments.


    -don



     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  14. Biddlin

    Biddlin Squier Talker

    Age:
    66
    70
    Apr 15, 2019
    SACRAMENTO. Ca usas
    P1010179.JPG P1010163.JPG


    P1010157.JPG
    I find 24 frets on an SG easy to play. The geometry of the guitar makes them all accessible.
    [​IMG]
    The Schester's heel shape seems less inviting.
     
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  15. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    51
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    I am watching this as I will be looking at a Gibson in the coming year, but I would take good stock in @AngelDeVille commentary due to posts and comments in general. Often accurate and fair.
     
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  16. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    The
    So far, I have consulted with several people and it is divided: half think it is all internet hogwash and the other half says Gibson went down hill after 2013.

    In any case, I really like the 2018 Faded in Bourbon, many think the maple neck is a downgrade, but in light of known headstock accidents, I think maple is a more solid wood for the neck. Perhaps it will also brighten up the tone overall and add some treble to the stock 490 pickups. Those are going for $799 on most sites. Add a hard case for $199 and I am out just under $1k for a Gibson.

    On the other hand, a 2010/2011 Standard Tribute (same specs, just the headstock inlay does not come on the Faded) from Sweetwater is running $1099. It is a $100 more than the 2018 Faded + hard case. Is it really worth it? I see Sweetwater are trying to rid themselves of these models, but why are they $1099?

    I am up in the air about my decision. I have only a few days to make my decision as the person bringing it down for me is booking their flights soon and it looks like they will be down here the second week of June.

    $1000 for a 2018 SG Faded Bourbon with a hard case
    OR
    $1100 for a 2011 SG Standard Tribute

    Quite possibly the hardest decision in my guitar buying life up until now!
    edit: for most, it is a question of buying, trying and returning if all does not go well... I do not have that option as I am residing in South America and returns or guarantees are not an option for me!
     
  17. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    51
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    Do you get a case with the Standard? Because I would say this. If you are spending $1100 on a guitar, you're not going to put it in a $29 gig bag. You are going to have to spend more money for a hard case. I would ask them to through one in for you.

    Also.. a 2010/1? That's close to 10 years old. They've been hanging on to that for a long time and paying insurance in case anything happens to it. Also, it's taking space that can be occupied by something new. Is is it even covered by Gibson anymore? It's almost vintage. And not only adding a case, what about pickup covers and switch ring (if you are so inclined).

    Spending that is not chump change. If it was a vintage or getting a more "period correct" guitar, that may hedge you one way or the other.-for instance, the newer Gibson Firebirds have regular tuners. Previous models had the banjo tuners, but there was a time they had Steinberger gearless tuners in a banjo-style. Given the newer models that offered all the most "original" specs? I would go with the slightly cheaper Steinberger tuner Firebird, then the older more expensive models with the banjo tuners. But given that the tuners were such a notable characteristic of the original model, my third choice would be the most recent and cheapest regular tuner model....because when spending that amount of money, I want to get THE EXACT model I want. (it's not a $120 Bullet and I change out a pickguard and knobs for $15)

    It's not an easy decision for sure.
     
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  18. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    734
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    This is why I am not sure this is even a good idea. No guitar can be in great shape if it's stored somewhere like that for a decade.

    It's also hard because I can't make a purchase like this too often and probably won't get another major $$ guitar for another 10 years...

    BTW, this is what a Sweetwater representative wrote back today:

    Thanks for the opportunity to help out with this, I hope you're doing well! The SG Faded was replaced this year by the SG Standard Tribute. The models that you see on our site are new models. Some of the new models deviate from the traditional serial numbers and start with the year instead. This isn't the first time that Gibson has done this. To commemorate their 100th anniversary in 1994 many of their serial numbers started with "94". It looks like they are doing the same for their 125th anniversary in 2019.

    Please feel free to give me a call if you would like to get into more specific details. I find these things tend to be much easier to explain over the phone.

    So what I get from that, is that I will be buying a commemorative edition from 2010 or 2011??

    more confused :oops::rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  19. BlueSquirrel

    BlueSquirrel Squier-Nut

    885
    Dec 21, 2018
    Europe
    Can't help but wish you luck!
     
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