Parents Music

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by dbrian66, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-holic

    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    Folsom Prison Blues.
     
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  2. BlueSquirrel

    BlueSquirrel Squier-Nut

    965
    Dec 21, 2018
    Europe
    That is amazing!
     
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  3. Davis Sharp

    Davis Sharp Dr. Squier

    Jan 7, 2016
    Maryland, USA
    My mother got her ear for American music by listening to GI imports during WWII and when she went to college in Atlanta in the 1950s. Her record collection contained Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee, and a number of Broadway soundtracks. I listen to all of the above with an appreciation for the arrangements and vocal phrasings.

    While in the kitchen, she would sing Elvis and Beatles songs and later added the Bee Gees and Whitney Houston to her repertoire. She has a real fondness for gospel-trained, powerful female voices. I think it goes back to her time in Atlanta. My younger son, when he was 12, shocked my mother when he pulled up a Dinah Washington track on the mp3 player.

    She also watched the Lawrence Welk show, but I try not to remember that.
     
  4. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    16 Tons is another great one. I think that was one my dad liked.
     
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  5. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Squier-Nut

    Age:
    108
    779
    Jan 29, 2017
    ABQ
    I have listened many times to that full Crew Cuts album and a few others. Them and the "Four Freshmen"
     
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  6. SoundDesign

    SoundDesign Squier-holic

    Elvis was as R&R as it got at our house. Besides that country - Willie Nelson, Charlie Pride, Freddy Fender, Waylon, Tom T Hall etc. Dad was a big George Jones guy.

    Travelling south (Myrtle and Florida) by car there were trips through the Smokies and stops in Nashville. I seemed to pick up a love of Bluegrass even though it wouldn't be reflected in their music collection.
     
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  7. LOSTVENTURE

    LOSTVENTURE Squier-Nut

    I was apparently born during the "big band" era. Glen Miller, the Dorseys, Lombardo, I really can only name a few. But, mom was into them full time. I can't remember a time when there was not music in the house. That old Zenith turntable literally turned constantly.
    And if mom found a song that she really liked, she would play it over repeatedly. Fortunately those 78 rpm disks were built to handle the wear. But, I have to give all that repeated play some of the credit for my ability to hear and then play along with song. The arrangements became as natural as breathing, I seemed to know what was coming without realizing it. It was sort of a talent that was drilled into my head from before I had any control of it.
    I'm just grateful that I discovered the guitar, and was able to put that early memory training to use.
     
  8. My dad was born in 1925, mom in '30. A lot revolved around the country scene especially for my dad back in the 50's and 60's. He played evenings in honky tonks and clubs back then. He expanded his musical tastes into the 1970's but really was a country boy at heart.



    Cheers, Barrie.
     
  9. jamndad

    jamndad Squier-holic

    Age:
    54
    Nov 23, 2013
    Bakersfield, Ca.
    Yep! My folks watched Lawrence Welk, as well, but Hee-Haw was a regular staple, too. My Pops sang bass in the church quartet and listened to The Blackwood Bros. My mom wore out Lynn Anderson's 'Never Promised You A Rose Garden'. LOL!!
     
  10. RetiredNSquired

    RetiredNSquired Squier-Nut

    Age:
    64
    892
    Jun 20, 2018
    Canton, Ga
    I was constantly surrounded by music growing up. My dad was part of a Doo-Wop type singing group in high school, they even had their own radio show in the small N.C. mill town they lived in. There was always Elvis, Ricky Nelson, (my mom thought he was cute!),Everly Bros., etc. My personal favorite was Buddy Holly. True story, I was 3 when my sister was born. I threw such a complete melt-down to name her Peggy Sue, that they finally capitulated. 60 yrs later Peggy Susanne still won't forgive me for that!
     
  11. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    Ha, now that you mentioned it we saw some Hee-Haw too. And Dad eventually started got some more current stuff including a Carpenters record, and a bunch of Herb Alpert's stuff. Unfortunately I was in college by the time he got more hip. He even listened to a couple Clapton albums I recorded on cassette for him. They were some of the middle records he did... the country influenced albums.
     
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  12. squierplayer

    squierplayer Squier-holic

    Feb 27, 2011
    Wisconsin
    Sum beech, whooda' thought we would all like " good music" Two kinds good and bad. LOL
     
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  13. newscaster

    newscaster Squier Talker

    Age:
    60
    59
    Aug 23, 2018
    Nevada
    Watched that too, still can't stand accordions and Irish tenors
     
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  14. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Squier-holic

    Age:
    53
    Nov 29, 2017
    Newnan ,Ga.
    My folks were born in the early 40s.

    My dad was mostly a country music kinda guy ,but loved CCR and like Lonns dad above ,we were surprised when my dad like Queen :eek:

    My mom like country too , but Elvis was her main music :)
     
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  15. CVSteve

    CVSteve Squier-Meister

    Age:
    64
    425
    Dec 28, 2017
    Texas
    My dad’s favorite tv show when I was a kid.

    I have a deep appreciation for Mancini because of this. Also, he told me a story about when he was 8 years old and got kicked out of a juke joint, but that one of the black women there told him to go aound to the back door and let him sit on the steps and listen to the music coming out. Segregation worked both ways back then.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
  16. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Squier-holic

    I agree! But I did like to watch Arthur Duncan tap dance, and Larry Hooper sing amazing bass. Unfortunately Larry's bass voice probably had something to do with his smoking, and before he died he had to cover the hole in his throat with his hand when he sang.
     
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  17. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Squier-Nut

    Age:
    59
    761
    Jan 19, 2018
    GA USA
    My Dad doesn't like music much at all. He tolerates some older church hymns but not much else. To him, it's all noise.

    My Mom played piano some and encouraged me and my brother to learn to play. But, we were only allowed to play and listen to traditional religious music and classical pieces. I tried to sneak in some other stuff but that usually got me a lecture on the evils of modern music, at least until I went off to college.
     
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  18. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    The theme of this thread -- an interesting one! -- has been largely focused on how our parents influenced us. As interesting -- especially for those currently raising children -- is how we as musicians may have influenced our own children.

    As I have mentioned before, Jan and I met as band-mates. She had been a founding member of the popular Boston group "IV Kings and a Queen" and had 'migrated' (i.e., we had stole her away!) ;) to my group who had just months earlier moved to Boston from NY, as I fulfilled my two year stint as "alternative service."

    That was the summer of `68. A tumultuous one in the world of rock music with "ups" such as the Woodstock concert, and downers such the spreading drug influences (andgrowing death toll) among fellow rockers.

    That change in the scene moved Jan and I to put aside our rock involvement as we thought in terms of making a stable family home. -Something we took very seriously, especially when we had the joy of learning Jan was with child.

    I went so far as to chuck the vast majority of my rock records, sold my electric gear, and went totally "folk" playing an acoustic guitar and banjo.

    My son grew up around that. And classical music.

    Most days I'd unwind after work with a symphony. Lying on the floor with pillows, and the stereo at approximately live orchestra volume.

    My son not only listened with me, but he took up guitar for a while and joined in the fun.

    Not surprisingly when my son reached his teen years rock got his attention. Indeed I'd sometimes come home from work and finding Led Zep blaring at near live volume. And, apart from sometimes asking him to turn it down a bit (Robert Plant's singing was to me like a squeaking chalkboard), that was fine. Indeed he even got back into guitar for a while, playing the same.

    But not too many years later I'd as often hear Vivaldi on his car radio as Zep. Now well into his forties most of his listening is what I think is called "world music" and "new age." Although he has season tickets for the Raleigh/Durham Symphony Orchestra, and also takes in more than a few rock concerts.

    To me the greatest gift we can give our children is exposure to all sorts of music and art. Then they are in the best position to choose what they, themselves, relate to.

    One rarely loves what what does not know.
    And one often comes to love what one does even if it not 'mainstream.'

    -don
     
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  19. Caddy

    Caddy Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    Nov 29, 2010
    Indiana
    My parent's music was the big band music of the 30's and 40's. I still love that music. During my high school years in the early 60'd I played a lot of it on guitar to accompany my dad on clarinet and sax. I still think that was the best music of the 20th century.

    BTW, I watched Lawrence Welk with my parents and grandmother and liked it. They had some very talented musicians and singers.
     
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  20. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    I agree Don, it is good to expose our kids to lots of music. It’s funny watching my two boys, Austin who is 9 and Brian who is 15. Very different kids. My musical tastes are all over the board, and I listen to everything as my mood dictates. (No one ever knows what they will hear coming out of my car speakers when I pull up. Brian one day told me he was relieved that I didn’t have Britney Spears playing when I picked him up from high school!) But my main genre, what I listen to and enjoy the most, is the 80’s hair band stuff. That’s what was popular through my high school days. And I played in a contemporary Christian praise band at church for as long as my boys can remember. Both boys enjoy both of those genres. But Austin leans pretty hard to the heavier Rock. He loves In This Moment, Godsmack, Shinedown and the like. His Drum instructor grew up in the 90’s exposed him to that kind of stuff. It’s a little bit of work filtering out the songs that are language appropriate for him ! LoL. But Brian, the 15 year old, likes the more classic rock stuff. AC/DC is his favorite band. Both are starting to listen to a lot of country now as well.

    I guess what I’m saying is, I want them to enjoy music as much as they can. I have great memories of listening to my moms music with her. I don’t want to tell them they can’t listen to a certain type of music just because I don’t like it. They have been exposed to a lot from me, and they have introduced me to some new stuff as well!
     
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