Modulating between songs of different keys

Discussion in 'Music, Theory, Tab and Such' started by DADGAD, Jan 17, 2018.

  1. DADGAD

    DADGAD Squier-Meister

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    This weekend, I will be performing five songs with the band. The songs are all in different keys, necessitated by the fact that there will be different singers for each. I need help with what cords to play at the end of each song to musically modulate to the beginning of the next song.

    Can you suggest a chord progression or formula that I can uses to get there?

    The keys are E, A, G, C then D.

    Thanks!
     
  2. plangentmusic

    plangentmusic Squier-holic

    Jul 4, 2012
    manhattan
    Just go to the 5 chord of the next key. Works every time.
     
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  3. MikeyH

    MikeyH Squier-Meister

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    Makes sense! Wish someone had told me that long ago.
     
  4. DADGAD

    DADGAD Squier-Meister

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    Thanks, guys. One song is in G and ends on a G chord. The next song is in C, and the fifth of C is the G chord. So there would be no modulation chord. Right?
     
  5. Roccobagadonuts

    Roccobagadonuts Squier-holic

    Sep 8, 2010
    Remulak
    Yea, seems like you would be there already with that switch. As the 5th chord in C would be a G major... Which is the 1 chord in the key of G...

    What starts to confuse me with the whole key changes thing is when I hear stuff like what Planet says... "Just go to the 5 chord of the next key. Works every time"... But then I think ok, say im in G... And im switching to the key of E at some point... If I went to the 5th chord of E as the switch like he says, which would be B major, I would start to clash with the notes that are in the key of G right from there start... The original key being played at 1st before making the switch to the key of E... As in the end the notes in the key of G are G A B C D E F#... While a B major chord would be like B D# and F#... And thats before getting into the "entire" key of E which contains even more clashing notes when compared to the key of G where there is just a single sharp, F#... I must be missing something when it comes to the tricks of trade on key changes/modulation that holds me back from "getting it"..

    That being said it seems like the switch your looking at is a much easier proposition. Goin from the key of G to C and changing over on the G major chord is a rather easy task when compared to some other leaps go as far as key changes go thats for sure... Planet, is there an easy way to explain while going to the 5th chord of the new key as the "setup" to a key change will "work" and not set up further clashes down the road as far as the next chord/notes go??? Why the 5th??? It starts u off with less clashing notes quite often on that 1st key change set up chord? Before getting into more "off" notes as you start to flow into the "new" key???
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2018
  6. Papa Joe

    Papa Joe Squier-Axpert

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    Yeah there is..You can use a G7th before the C...Or an Gaug, which is what I sometimes use there..
     
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  7. squierTony

    squierTony Dr. Squier

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  8. DADGAD

    DADGAD Squier-Meister

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    Only if they make a capo for singers. ;)
     
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  9. Papa Joe

    Papa Joe Squier-Axpert

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    Dec 12, 2009
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    Another thing that can sometimes work is to stop playing for one bar and pick up in the new key..
     
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  10. radiotech

    radiotech Dr. Squier

    Apr 23, 2014
    Chicago
    Hahahaha!
    If Only!
     
  11. johnnywizzo

    johnnywizzo Squier-Meister

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    Feb 4, 2016
    A tourniquet on the neck?
     
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