Mo knobs, mo problems

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by otisblove, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. otma

    otma Squier-Nut

    987
    Nov 4, 2012
    Owen, Wisconsin
    I saw one of the Rig Rundown videos with Joe Perry, and he had one of the BC Rich guitars like that. When his tech was asked what all the controls did, he replied that they were all disconnected except for the volume, tone, and 3 way selector.
     
  2. otma

    otma Squier-Nut

    987
    Nov 4, 2012
    Owen, Wisconsin
    4488551637_471dc4d42c.jpg

    Then there are those who go the other way. It kind of makes the one switch on the upper horn look lonely. You should probably get a pilot's license for this.
     
  3. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    True for people. True, also, for entire cultures.

    One sees it when comparing post WWII Europe with post WWII Japan -- the later reborn following the war. All the glitz and gizmo. The neon signs that filled the cities.

    America tends towards a youth culture. Companies know that's where the easy to win money is and cater to it. And thus all the "new! new! new!" excitement in the media, all the fresh young faces in the commercials.

    When I was super into stereo gear in the late 70s and 80s I saw that companies that were looking to sell to youths festooned their gear with colored and flickering lights and lots and lots of switches. "Mid-fi" we gear snobs called it. Sold at discount department stores and the like. Kenwood was one such.

    I had a friend who was in charge of all electronics service for Kenwood in Europe. He, too, was a gear nut but in his case his choices were based on a deep working knowledge.

    When he learned that I was looking to do an upgrade of my electronics he offered to get me gear at cost and send it over to me from his main office in Frankfurt, Germany. When he suggested Kenwood I was floored. But what he suggested, and then sent, was totally different than what was sold here in the US (or for that matter, as he told me, on US bases in Europe) -- it was an upscale line called "Basic" and that exactly described it. The pre-amp had "basic" controls. The power amp (220 watts RMS per channel -- that is HUGE) had an on/off switch and two small output knobs.

    It sounded (sounds still - I am still using it) unbelievable.

    "Why don't they sell that here?" I asked my friend.

    "Americans won't buy it" he answered. "They like lots of lights and switches."

    Uh huh.

    :)

    -don
     
  4. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    There's a funny parallel there Don.
    You've seen the stamped tin robots and other such toys that came out of Japan in the 50s and 60s, right? They show up on Antiques Roadshow all the time and fetch insane money if they're rare or have a particularily intricate paint scheme. I have a buddy that sells vintage camera equipment on fleabay and His passion is collecting those sorts of toys. He's based in Kyoto and has access to the variants of those toys that were only sold in the Japanese market. What's funny about those Japan only versions is that their appearance is generally less flashy and much more restrained than their made for America equivalents. I asked Jiri(his name) about that and his reply was much the same as the one you got: the flashier stuff sells better in the US.
     
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  5. Dr Improbable

    Dr Improbable Squier-holic

    Age:
    52
    Apr 4, 2015
    Wisconsin
    Although I prefer simple, something like this makes me feel all weak in the knees..

    houndddog3.jpg
     
  6. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    Another example of what you were talking about.
    Elegent but understated, simple looks, which would have made it a non-seller in the US during the years that it was made. On the other hand it was(and still is) an extreamly potent road car(and if you have family back in the old country that could line me up with one, you could have ALL that I own!:D):
    Lancia Stratos.jpg
     
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  7. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Is that a Lancia? It looks to my eye like a Bertone design.

    There are people here in the US who appreciate understated beauty, but it is not typically "American." Here 'bigger is better" was the standard. Glitz and raw power more than finesse.

    That there are some, though, who appreciate those other standards is evidenced by my own 'fun car.' -One I have owned for over thirty years. This one: A 1977 FIAT/Pininfarina Spider

    Side3Qrear.jpg
    They were made almost exclusively for the American market. And sold in fairly significant numbers from their release at the Turin Motor Show in 1966 up until almost the mid 80s when FIAT left the US. (They were then for a short time sold under the actual designer/maker's name - "Pininfarina")

    But the first thing the average American asks is "Is it fast?" Not "how does it handle." And raw, straight line speed is not what it is about. (Challenge it on a tight, twisty road, and then you'll see what it can do!) :D

    In recent years America, or at least some portions of America (we are a big a varied place!), :) have become more like the Europeans -- as they have become more like us.

    Of course the main thing is that whatever we want we can find it here. We can each have our own dream and pursue it. That is really the essence of America. "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."

    :)

    -don

     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
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  8. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    Don, I'm Shocked!!:D
    It's a Lancia Stratos, probably one of the most successful rally cars that ever turned a wheel. It was also, to my knowledge, the first purpose designed car for rally racing, which probably goes a long way to explaining why it dominated the sport through the mid 70s. The were I think three engines availalable(Lancia Fulvia V4, Beta I4, Ferrari V6) but the one that the car was most known for was the V6, which came straight from the Ferrari Dino V6. The Stratos was a light car, around 900 to 950 kg, and that made for some serious performance with the "little" Ferrari engine. Being mid engined it also handled like a dream, even on the rougher courses and that made it a favorite with many of the drivers who piloted the Stratos. About the only weakness that I think the Stratos had was a tendancy to eat its gearbox after a few thousand kms but that was ironed out in the later versions. And although it was designed purely for rally work there were two examples built for endurance racing that featured a KKK turbo that boosted the standard 320hp to well over 550hp. Those cars competed against the Porsche 935s of the day and although the potential was there in the Stratos, it never got the sustained developement to beat the German cars consistantly. A shame really because if the Group 5 Stratos had recieved that kind of attention and developement, it would have easily beat Porsche at it's own game I think.
    Anyway, it's one of my "dream" cars and should a lottery ever drop into my lap, the Stratos is the car that I would buy for those Sunday morning drives in the summer,..
    And my day car would be a Fulvia 1.4,..:D
     
  9. Caddy

    Caddy Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    Nov 29, 2010
    Indiana
    Well, simplicity has always been the norm for me since I began playing in the late 50's. A guitar and amp with clean sound and built in reverb is really all I use or have ever used or needed.

    Never owned any pedals until fairly recently, other than the Gibson Maestro Fuzz Tone I bought in the early 60's (shortly after they came out). Then it was only brought and used for two songs, Satisfaction and The Ventures 2000 Pound Bee.

    The only pedals I ever use are my Boss FRV-1 with an amp with no Reverb and very occasionally a delay pedal and an echo pedal, and those two are very rarely used.
     
    Afrika61 likes this.
  10. CVSteve

    CVSteve Squier-Meister

    Age:
    64
    413
    Dec 28, 2017
    Texas
    My “office”.
    DB1C674F-BC0D-475E-9FD9-19CC697A0968.jpeg
    My Affinity Jazzmaster has a 3 way switch, 1 volume, 1 tone and no trem.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
  11. kjmac

    kjmac Squier-Nut

    Age:
    62
    745
    Aug 14, 2017
    Omaha, NE
    You say you prefer simple. Here is my single pickup, single knob Strat partscaster.


    Partscaster 2.jpg
     
  12. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    It has too many cut-aways.

    ;)

    -don
     
  13. otisblove

    otisblove Squier-Nut

    Age:
    44
    568
    Aug 19, 2016
    Chicago
    Is the volume knob really necessary?
     
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  14. kjmac

    kjmac Squier-Nut

    Age:
    62
    745
    Aug 14, 2017
    Omaha, NE
    It plugs the hole in the pickguard. :)
     
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