Jazzmaster neck woes

Discussion in 'Squier Offset Guitars' started by ancientsurf, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. ancientsurf

    ancientsurf Squier-Meister

    Age:
    65
    136
    Mar 16, 2013
    Hawick, Scotland
    Thanks so1om,

    I'll check the wife's make up bag. I had some of the granddaughter's but it has dried out and she has her own place now!
     
  2. Catalyst

    Catalyst Squier Talker

    Age:
    23
    9
    Dec 27, 2018
    Blagoevgrad
    Well considering a Jazzmaster is actually normal scale like a Strat or Tele, wouldnt make sense to put 10/11s in the first place. A Jag is short scale, therefore 10s work well on it.
     
    BlueSquirrel likes this.
  3. DaveDrums

    DaveDrums Squier-Nut

    900
    Feb 2, 2017
    MA, USA
    Sounds like you’re doing everything right, maybe the truss rod is an issue. I range from 9s to 10s on 25.5 and 24.75 scale lengths and hardly ever adjust the truss. I’ve also never shimmed a neck but I get the idea.
    The only neck that ever gave me issues (with up bow aka #1) was my Squier VM Jag Bass and that involved taking the neck off, slacking the tension of the rod, putting it on an incline fretboard facing down (neck holder positioned near nut, heel on a table), and pushing down an ungodly amount on the back of the neck around the 9th fret while a tech tightened the rod back up. It’s held but I use Super Slinky (light gauge) bass strings.
    Hope your Jazzy behaves and works out for you, I love mine.
    Like this, but cripes I wish I had thought of using a clamp:
     
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  4. ancientsurf

    ancientsurf Squier-Meister

    Age:
    65
    136
    Mar 16, 2013
    Hawick, Scotland
    Hi Dave,

    There is a lot of useful info on You Tube, and I suppose all you need to do is know where to look.

    The few guitarists in my home area are folkies playing acoustics and the only local music store closed its doors last year. Was a time here when quite a few kids were playing electrics, but they just don't seem interested these days.

    There was a guitar tech about 12 miles away for a while but he has disappeared. I would have taken the JM to him, but he was only there a few months. He moved location once or twice then just took off somewhere. Probably not enough business here to keep him going.

    The JM seems to have settled down. Part of the issue is that I've hardly ever played it in the 7 years I've had it. I play other instruments as well as guitar otherwise I might have had it all sorted by now.

    Thanks for your help. It is appreciated.
     
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  5. Caddy

    Caddy Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    Nov 29, 2010
    Indiana
    I am surprised by your problem. I set up my VM Jazzmaster with 11's when I bought it back in 2012 and have not had to make any further adjustments since. I have the action set at 4/64" at he 17th fret (Fender specs). I store it in the case when not in use with the trem arm still in place. When I take it out it is nearly always still in tune. Have never readjusted the truss rod since the initial setup. It seems to be my most stable guitar. I did use a tiny bit of blue Loctite on the bridge and saddle screws during my initial setup back in 2012 to eliminate the chance of them moving. Not sure that was even necessary with the 11's on it. That is the only 'mod' I made to it. My VM Jag did get a slight neck shim when I initially set it up, but not so with the Jazzmaster.

    Oh, one other major mod. Swapped out the pickups for Fender Pure Vintage 62's.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 1:41 PM
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  6. ancientsurf

    ancientsurf Squier-Meister

    Age:
    65
    136
    Mar 16, 2013
    Hawick, Scotland
    I've probably had about 15 or so electric guitars since I was about 11 years old, and I can't recall neck issues on any of them. One or two of the earliest ones in the 60s were prehistoric no-name Strat copies, and all you had to worry about was how you were going to play above the 5th fret. Nobody, other than the pros, seemed wised up then on all the finer points.

    I remember having a Fender Tele in the 70s and it was the best of the bunch. However, even so, most of the present day offerings I've owned, from the cheapest crap to the not so cheap crap, have been way better than that Tele in terms of playability, if perhaps not in the sound department.

    I suppose my unfamiliarity with offsets has probably played a part in the frustration. I've probably been tinkering about too much with the guitar. I checked the action again today, and it's about 3/64ths at the 17th fret, with no clicks, buzzes, or rattles.

    We UK types who formerly used the old Imperial measurements have a bit of difficulty with having to use metric, although I also get a bit confused with Fenders "4/64ths". If I'd quoted that measurement to a storeman for a part they'd have laughed in my face and said, "Son, that's just a 1/16th. Don't make it any harder than it's meant to be." The only imperial rule I have left is in 16ths, and the action is just below a 1/16th at the 17th fret on top E string.

    Not sure if 64ths is a measurement used only in guitars, or is it a standard US scale of reference?

    New guitar string measurement gauge on its way from eBay. Still can't find the old one!
     
    so1om likes this.
  7. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    51
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    I think your neck is likely a-ok, it may be subject to your geographic climate, but I think it's ok and your skills are fine.

    Sadly the US still uses inches. I think by the end of the 1970s we'll be all metric though. You ARE 100% CORRECT that this is no thing such as 4/64ths" and I ether feel like laughing in their face or slapping them because... Math. Also.. If you use a scale that has only 1/16th markings, it's certainly easier to see.

    I've gone the course of using feeler gauges under the strings. I can visually see if one more gauge nudges the string higher rather than the parallax of my vision sight line and where I may off. Also.. as you know... Anything can be used to measure. even marks on a piece of car stock.
     
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  8. ancientsurf

    ancientsurf Squier-Meister

    Age:
    65
    136
    Mar 16, 2013
    Hawick, Scotland
    Our climate is famously mild (cold by UK standards) and damp with fairly high humidity, and the central heating is usually on for about 8 months of the year. The rooms are warm through the day but can get cold at night, and that may well be a factor. I only have 5 guitars these days, all kept on a guitar rack, and the rest of them are fine. Might think about storing the JM elsewhere, and that will leave a convenient space on the guitar stand!

    I think I had convinced myself there was something wrong with the JM neck, but it appears it's just different from the rest.

    It is actually a very nice guitar when I give it a chance, which I will, now that the guitar and I seem to be at one with each other.

    Thanks to everybody who has convinced me that it is OK.
     
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  9. so1om

    so1om Dr. Squier

    Age:
    51
    Feb 10, 2010
    Chicago
    "Paralysis by analysis" What's worse is I have a not so common vintage motorcycle and hmm.. does that tick over and idle sound right? and no one has a similar bike near me to compare it to. LOL.

    So i'm like you. sometimes I "forget" or concerned over the appearance that something may be amiss when it's really not.

    Enjoy the weekend!
     
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