Improving your sense of rhythm

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by fattboyzz, Sep 3, 2019.

  1. Jay Jackson

    Jay Jackson Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    551
    Sep 1, 2018
    sanluisobispo CA (3401
    that is good advise for players that need better rhythm. I have good rhythm mostly due to takeing some drum lessons when I was 14. Did my instructors start us off using a metronome you bet they did.
     
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  2. Papa Joe

    Papa Joe Squier-Axpert

    Age:
    90
    Dec 12, 2009
    Swanton Ohio
    Very sound advise..My biggest problem has always been my poor sense of meter..I have a tendency to speed up..Always on ahead of the beat..Couple that with a drummer and bass player with the same issues and it gets crazy mixed up..Been there done that..
    Use the metrodome..
     
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  3. fuelish

    fuelish Squier-Nut

    Meh....the slow decay of the quartz crystal implanted in my sinus by extraterrestrials keeps a nice steady beat, although it's a bit monotonous...
     
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  4. ksandbergfl

    ksandbergfl Squier-Meister

    391
    Sep 7, 2015
    I never had a metronome, but for years (in college) I always jammed along to drum patterns on a cheap old Casio keyboard. I've been told I have impeccable timing.
     
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  5. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    There are two major aspects to "rhythm." Constancy and accuracy being one, elasticity -- its opposite, but in absolute control, being the other.

    The worst players lack both. The best players excel in both.

    Most of us through practice (and yes, a metronome is a good tool for this) can master the first. The 2nd seems to fall more into the "what God has left out no man can put in" category.

    I today play almost exclusively with what I call The Black Box Band. It sounds pretty human, but its heart is a metronome.

    That, though, is in one way a plus: Its constancy allows me elasticity, even though I do not possess a true master's control.

    Those with that gift are rare, and even working with such is wonderful.

    Mike Machat (drums) and Roger Ponzi (bass) were probably to Abstracts fans the least musically front and center of the band's members. (Roger's showmanship, though, put him out front) But we band members knew that the exact opposite was the case. For the two of them together was perfection in both categories. Creative but absolutely on the mark beat and rhythm-wise

    Here's one of my favorite tracks of them working off one-another. (Notice how my guitar become the metronome!)


    -don



    Roger Memorium.jpg






     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
  6. ksandbergfl

    ksandbergfl Squier-Meister

    391
    Sep 7, 2015
    heehee... it don't mean a thing, if it ain't got that swing.....
     
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  7. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    72
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Exactly!

    And just as a child can often tell when they are being lied to so something within us knows.

    Kind'a wonderful when you think about it. Even for those of us without "it." Right up there with "truth" and "beauty." :)

    -don
     
  8. WNCStratman

    WNCStratman Squier-Meister

    Age:
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    Aug 21, 2019
    North Carolina
    Rhythm is something I’ve never struggled with. It seems like it’s something that was just ingrained in me from the moment I picked up a guitar. I do think that through lots of practice that someone can definitely improve their rhythm but there’s a certain point where no amount of practice is going to replace something that’s just naturally there. Prime example, a kid I grew up with started playing guitar around the same time I did. He spent hours reading tablature and learning different songs but regardless of how much he practiced, his rhythm was horrible. As far as I know it was something he was never able to remedy. Just my two cents.....
     
  9. LOSTVENTURE

    LOSTVENTURE Squier-Nut

    I've always had a metronome of some sort around. But, once the loopers and Trio devices became available, I have found them to be much more useful tools.
    Not only do they keep my timing on track, but they allow me to work on my improvisational skills as well.
    Hours on end.........
     
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  10. CVSteve

    CVSteve Squier-Nut

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    Dec 28, 2017
    Texas
    I agree with all of the above. I just wanted to throw this into the discussion.

     
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  11. eaglesgift

    eaglesgift Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    990
    Apr 18, 2014
    Chiang Mai, Thailand
    I agree there's a lot more to rhythm than playing in time with a metronome but I don't think it's a gift that you're born with. In my experience, the most 'talented' musicians are those that have worked the hardest to learn their instrument. Playing with swing is quite simple for example - just play a bit behind the beat (from a guitarist's perspective I mean).
     
  12. WNCStratman

    WNCStratman Squier-Meister

    Age:
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    285
    Aug 21, 2019
    North Carolina
    That’s a fantastic video, thanks for adding that in Steve!!
     
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  13. CVSteve

    CVSteve Squier-Nut

    Age:
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    521
    Dec 28, 2017
    Texas
    ;)
     
  14. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Squier-holic

    Age:
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    Nov 29, 2017
    Newnan ,Ga.
    Thanks for posting this . It's like a mini rhythm clinic ;)
     
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  15. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Squier-holic

    Age:
    54
    Nov 29, 2017
    Newnan ,Ga.
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