Hi Nerds, Can I join your club?

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by rolie, Apr 13, 2019.

Would you buy a fully upgraded and modifed painted squier guitar ~$500?

  1. Yes

    5.9%
  2. No

    52.9%
  3. No, $500 is too much

    38.2%
  4. Maybe, if it had a cool design

    2.9%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Hi fellow guitar geeks and freaks.
    Just joined this forum.

    Wanted to say Hi.

    Hi,
    I love squier guitars,
    My aspirations are to paint/upgrade and modify them to sell on reverb or here. Don't know if I can quit my day job but, any dream is worth pursuing.

    Here's a picture of some of my equipment and a work in progress squier bullet mustang still designing in illustrator.

    Let me know what you think. Lol be brutal if it looks that bad. I can always edit colors, etc. Down for any constructive criticism. I may make a template for other mustangs, or create one for the other squier models. Any feedback appreciated.

    cheers

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is my first real upgrade/ modified guitar. Have it most of it designed in illustrator. I'm upgrading all the hardware and will think of adding other electronic hacks other than the pickup upgrades.

    A proper kill switch. most kill switch have that clicking noise, which isn't the way Tom Morello had his wired. He wired his with 2 volume knobs. So I may add 2 dual concentric knobs. Or remove output jack, and add a strat type plug in the rear. Or do both and have an extra hole for another knob. I also can add another switch by the toggle switch.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
    corn, cool gouhl, Big tuna and 4 others like this.
  2. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Squier-holic

    Sep 27, 2014
    Offline
    Welcome to the forum!! If you're asking if a $150 Squier Bullet Mustang with a bunch of upgrades and repaint is worth $500, the answer unfortunately is nowhere even close. You'd be hard pressed to even get $150 or 200 no matter what's been done. Modify for your own pleasure, it's never profitable. The ONLY way you can ever modify and make a profit selling is when you buy a used Squier for like 30-40 bucks then upgrade it.....and even then it's sometimes a tough sell....

    Your design looks great by the way, it's just not profitable doing what you're thinking of doing.....
     
  3. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Yeah,
    Realistically looking at a few people that do that. I've seen 1 guy on reverb sell customized paint swirls, but I think he grabs the really cheap squier affinity guitars to make a profit, and cheap hardware upgrades to keep profits up, and hype lol.

    I'll try a few guitars, and go the extra mile and make videos maybe. It does look bleak. Iv'e seen amazing work on Reverb for guitars but they don't really sell anymore. Maybe they consumed so much time on the guitar that it wasn't worth the time invested in it.
     
    dbrian66 likes this.
  4. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Squier-holic

    Sep 27, 2014
    Offline
    I wouldn't try modding any except if you want to keep them or if you find something used dirt cheap.....I'd hate to see you have a bunch of money invested and not even be able to break even.....which would happen with a Squier Bullet Mustang......you'd end up putting like $200 more into a $150 guitar, so you're into it for $350, and you could only sell it for 200 max.....see what I mean?
     
  5. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    True,
    The profit would and time would be like working a minimum wage job.
    If it were possible I'd have to find cheap squiers that are around 60 bucks. I found the maple fretboard one on my couch for $60 bucks, but they typically sell for ~$100.
    The guy that does paint swirls ventured into other designs that have sold for $500 bucks. Think has sold multiple "Huckleberry" strats that are highly modified. He seems to sell these quickly.

    I'll try but I may be reluctant to add those hardware hacks like you said.
     
    Eddie, dbrian66 and Guitarmageddon like this.
  6. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Squier-holic

    Sep 27, 2014
    Offline
    If that guy sells them for that much, they probably have fake Fender logos on them....or at least no sign of Squier anywhere....it's a bit dishonest.....we've seen it a lot.

    You should mod for your own fun - that's what we do! You can make some cool looking and sounding instruments that YOU get to enjoy.....
     
  7. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    No he's upfront with everything, except for some of the hype lol.
    He's sold multiple of these huckleberry models from various used squiers. He mostly sells the swirls, but he has ventured doing other designs. He sells on ebay too. But he is the only one Iv'e really seen sell multiple in a sort of small business sort of way. He does great work. I'm not sure he quit his day job. But he seems to have a lot of fun and a true love for it.

    https://reverb.com/item/21280682-ea...nder-squier-se-electric-guitar?show_sold=true
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
    squierbilly and dbrian66 like this.
  8. Davis Sharp

    Davis Sharp Dr. Squier

    Jan 7, 2016
    Maryland, USA
    Welcome to Squier-Talk. That's a nice bunch of guitars you have.

    Your design looks good, but I agree with what @Guitarmageddon wrote about resale value of painted guitars.
     
    SquierTap, dbrian66 and Jim Belaye like this.
  9. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Thanks bro,
    Should be a fun adventure. I'm learning so much on these forums. The cool thing about the squiers is they are super cheap to experiment and master my luthier skills before I try to modify mim fenders and maybe american made. The great thing about reverb.com is that I can research what designs sell well, unlike ebay.

    Dragon painted guitars seem to have this weird niche, Ive glanced at sold listings, something mystical about them. I also have an endless supply of ancient Japanese art that isnt copyrighted because of age.

    Maybe if fender wants to hire me lol. A man can dream.
     
    Eddie and dbrian66 like this.
  10. lespaul1968

    lespaul1968 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    621
    Jan 26, 2019
    Indiana
    You can search completed listing on eBay
     
    Eddie and dbrian66 like this.
  11. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Not All unfortunately I think it goes back 6 months or so. Unless yiu know a way to get past 6 months?
     
    dbrian66 likes this.
  12. lespaul1968

    lespaul1968 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    621
    Jan 26, 2019
    Indiana
    Yea your probably right six months only
     
    dbrian66 likes this.
  13. jjudas

    jjudas Squier-holic

    Mar 23, 2016
    Metro New Orleans
    Hello and Welcome!
     
    dbrian66 and rolie like this.
  14. Shaytan

    Shaytan Squier-Meister

    Age:
    21
    459
    Apr 10, 2018
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Something I've learned from the folks over Strat-Talk is that regardless if a refinish may make a guitar less valuable, what matters the most is whether you like it or not. If it's a really cool guitar you truly enjoy, then the thought of selling it won't be something that would come to your mind.

    Here's the thing: if you want to make a living off that pretty interesting craft, you gotta take two things into consideration: whether your custom designs would appeal to someone and how well you'd make them. In short, you'd need to both keep in mind you'd need to find someone who enjoyed your design so much to want that one of a kind guitar, and then it would have to be any decently made to justify the price tag (if you are planning to hand-paint it, then certainly the right person would value the craftsmanship, but if instead you plan on printing a decal to apply on top of it and clear coat over it, I have my doubts anyone would be willing to pay nearly as much for it).

    Just as an example regarding the last point, not too long ago I wanted to buy a new guitar to replace another one I had sold. One that I tried a couple times and really loved, matching all the things I looked for on my new purchase and which played like a dream was a MIJ '94 Jackson Fusion Pro. Among other things, it had been custom refinished in a crackle style finish, as you can see bellow:

    [​IMG]

    It looks pretty cool in the picture, doesn't it? Thing is, up close you'd notice some pretty big flaws, such as two huge bubbles bellow the bridge (not visible in any of the pics, you'd have to see it in person), the uneven clear coat, the fact the black stripes are basically some very loosely made brush marks, and the actual crackle effect was seemingly just a decal applied on top of the paint.

    Certainly I would've still bought it if it wasn't super overpriced given the overall condition (had a chip on the headstock, the logo quite yellowed, one of the tuners was broken and the seller couldn't say for certain the neck pup was the original one), but despite showcasing a pretty cool refinish that quite pleased me, due to not being really that well made I was already pondering how easy would it be to strip it down and go with a natural finish - not exactly your goal if you're selling an instrument with the added bonus of a one of a kind refinish.

    Just to wrap this up, my brutally honest opinion is that if you genuinely like the idea of making some cash designing and making guitar artworks, you'd do better making a couple just to showcase your talent - creating a portfolio, basically - and then work as a designer to hire: some dude would want his/her guitar refinished with this or that idea, and you'd design and paint it to the client's taste. Otherwise, I suppose making such specific designs to sell to the general public would be an hard sale.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
  15. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Thanks for informative post. I do see where you are coming from. Appreciate the brutal honesty.

    I do see a lot of people selling custom crafts, but not really selling to make a living off of. A compromise between what I want to design and what would sell. Finding a balance between the two. Sort of how some tattoo artists have free reign on certain clients and come with some amazing stuff. But that client is a rarity I would assume, considering how permanent a tattoo is.

    So I have to obviously pick something that would sell and be something I would love painting. I feel I have found something in dragon artwork in guitars that sells and interests me. I love ukiyo-e japanese art from 17th century. I'm in process of converting a lot the artwork to a clean vector format.

    I'd be painting my designs by hand, just designing them in a digital format for its flexibility. Painting looks way better also. I can use fluorescent colors that will show win black light. I have so many ideas that I need to explore. Some ideas, that other posters have mentioned may be a waste of time. Definitely don't want to do that.

    Bummer that you were disappointed in your upgraded guitar. I would be sickened if I were the seller selling a non functional and chipped guitar. I would be opposed to selling you something like that. I want people to be satisfied in purchasing a custom guitar. Something that can be inspired by at an affordable price.

    I have considered becoming a graphic designer. I know people that do that and they seem miserable because they are not doing the art that they want to. Just doing commission pieces like how composers used to create music for other people. I have much more creative freedom working for myself.

    Me working at fender or other guitar would be a dream. I would work my ass off 24/7 and be dreaming about it nightly keeping me up.

    I do understand it'll be hard work. I will fall, but I feel like a failure if I don't even try. But it's something I truly love doing. I feel confident enough to try my hardest and follow my dreams. It will be tough at first. I honestly feel I can be successful, eventually.....
     
    squierbilly, Shaytan and dbrian66 like this.
  16. Davis Sharp

    Davis Sharp Dr. Squier

    Jan 7, 2016
    Maryland, USA
    Game of Thrones. Final Season. Get your GoT-like-but-different-enough-to-avoid-a-lawsuit guitar before they're all gone.
     
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  17. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Haha, Yes I need to watch for inspiration. Make as many dragon guitars while it's still a thing. Thanks for reference
     
    dbrian66 likes this.
  18. dbrian66

    dbrian66 Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Jul 14, 2017
    Maryland, USA
    First off, your guitar design looks great! I love it. One way you might be able to make some money is selling painted bodies. Buy a Squier for a good price, sell the neck for half the cost of the guitar, and then sell the body for the profit. If your work is really good, you could probably sell custom painted bodies for $150. You would really just be selling your artwork.

    And welcome to the forum!
     
  19. rolie

    rolie Squier-Meister

    103
    Apr 12, 2019
    Southern California
    Thanks great idea. May try painting bodies, or maybe both, users can mix and match lol
     
    dbrian66 and squierbilly like this.
  20. squierbilly

    squierbilly Dr. Squier

    Apr 21, 2013
    sunny phoenix
    Who You Calling a Nerd!?..
    Revenge-of-the-Nerds-1984-revenge-of-the-nerds-11710197-950-534.jpg
    LOL..
    I think you could sell custom painted guitars,, you just couldnt charge a arm and a leg for them.. i like the 150. Over price.. (for a full body painted front and back).. of course for that price you couldnt spend to much time or detail on it..
    Like the idea of neon or glow in the dark also..
    Welcome to Squier Talk,,,
    we ARE Nerds,, with guitars.. :( :rolleyes:
     
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