Fender vs Squier

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by fattboyzz, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. mikm

    mikm Dr. Squier

    Jun 4, 2012
    NY
    Yeah, I did not mention that I replaced my original ceramics with a set of Alnicos but in all fairness, the MIM ceramics are decent pickups. All my strats have had mods done to em but that's the beauty of Leo's design. For me it's hard to resist making changes to my stuff!
     
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  2. eaglesgift

    eaglesgift Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    890
    Apr 18, 2014
    ———-
    Life will be even shorter for me if I start buying USA Fenders and my wife finds out. :)
     
  3. surfrodguitar

    surfrodguitar Squier-holic

    Aug 4, 2016
    Laguna Niguel
    @eaglesgift I hear ya!!


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  4. Jim Belaye

    Jim Belaye Squier-holic

    Age:
    56
    Jul 25, 2015
    Montréal, Canada
    @DougMen The neck on the Player Strat is slimmer than the MIM Std? Is it slim like the CV Strat? I like a slim neck.
     
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  5. Conghaille

    Conghaille Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Jul 12, 2016
    Chicago
    I have two MiM strats—an FR and a Standard. I think they are both very good instruments, but I will admit that I’ve seen better OEM pickups (and much worse) in that price range. But to me, spending some money to upgrade pickups is something I almost always do regardless of price—it shapes the tone and personalizes the instrument. To me, complaining that the pickups or tone on a mid-range instrument don’t compare to American pickups is 1)subjective and 2)a little silly. We get what we pay for.
     
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  6. SpeedKing

    SpeedKing Squier-holic

    Apr 9, 2015
    UK
    Hmmm.

    A Stratocaster (lets say) is a tool for making sound.

    It has a carved, rounded and routed body usually made from pieces of timber glued together (although potentially from one complete piece) into an identifiable shape with a finish applied. A neck usually again of wood (and again single piece or multiple) carved to an only slightly varying identifiable shape with a set length with an applied finish with metal frets at certain intervals and a strengthening adjustable metal rod, a nut (various materials possible) and tuners. Finally a metal bridge mechanism with six adjustable saddles, magnetic pickups, electrical jacks switches & dials & wiring, a pickguard and screws.

    All of these components can be made to varying qualities with varying degrees of quality control and consequent price points yet essentially they all attempt to fulfil the same basic function. Most succeed since nowadays many of these components can be made by machine as well as by hand thus ensuring consistency and precision.

    Squier guitars are at a lower price point (although the two do practically meet) so generally one accepts lower quality components (although the sonic and tactile differences between two CNC produced yet still individual Alder bodies by Fender in the US or Squier in China I think would be hard to define. Some may sustain noticeably more than others but is this more true for the more expensive timber? Likewise bridge components .. more sustain, better tone?) however, the question of the effects of quality control must also be considered. Lots of quality control is no match for effective quality control.

    That brings us then to everything subjective about the tool's basic function for it's user. What sound it makes, how easy it is to make that sound consistently when required and how pleasurable it is when making that sound and owning that tool.

    Bottom line is the 'best' one is the best one to the individual user based on those four factors completely regardless of price. It's simply that spending more money on higher quality perhaps even individually selected components and higher quality control (or providing them yourself of course!) is statistically more likely to get you there.

    Of course ultimately the issue of where is 'there' is for the individual.
     
  7. eaglesgift

    eaglesgift Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    890
    Apr 18, 2014
    ———-
    For me, my location plays a part in my choices and what represents good value for money and what doesn't. MIA guitars are more expensive here than they used to be in the UK - not so much since the pound started on it's never ending downward spiral but it still makes a difference to my thought process when I'm evaluating guitars. Swapping out pickups is something I've done before and would definitely do in the future, and some work on the nuts or new nuts is also a great upgrade for many guitars. When it comes to pots and capacitors, I've yet to go there because I'm just not convinced the benefits would justify the work involved (soldering isn't one of my strengths and although I may be wrong, I feel any changes in sound quality/character are likely to be very small, if I notice them at all). For me also, I think I have to draw a line somewhere with upgrades: if I found myself upgrading the wiring, pots, capacitors, switches, tuners, pickups and nuts on one guitar, I might start to ask myself whether it might not have been easier to just buy another guitar. An exception might be a secondhand guitar that I picked up very cheaply and that plays great but has poor quality components.
     
    Kenneth Mountain likes this.
  8. surfrodguitar

    surfrodguitar Squier-holic

    Aug 4, 2016
    Laguna Niguel
    Either way Fender has cracked the code for a successful guitar manufacture. Offer less expensive models of your most popular guitars and more. Some people will upgrade to Fender after buying a Squier or they buy more Squiers and Fenders. Genius! They must love that we debate and compare the two “brands”.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  9. eaglesgift

    eaglesgift Squier-Nut

    Age:
    51
    890
    Apr 18, 2014
    ———-
    Yeah, it's quite funny when you put it like that. :)

    I've got 5 Squier guitars, 2 Gretsches and a Jackson so they should be happy with my purchasing decisions.
     
  10. surfrodguitar

    surfrodguitar Squier-holic

    Aug 4, 2016
    Laguna Niguel
    @eaglesgift. I had 20+ guitars a couple years ago...10+ Squiers that includes Jag, Jazz, Teles, 51, Strats...than I decided I wanted a Fender Jag. Sold em all except the MIJ Strat and got the Jag.


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  11. DougMen

    DougMen Squier-holic

    Age:
    65
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    I'm not sure about the front to back thickness, but looking at the specs of the Player Strat, the nut width is 1.65", same as the Classic Vibe Strats. And when I play it, it feels just as slim as my CV 60's Strat, or possibly even slimmer.
     
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  12. radiotech

    radiotech Dr. Squier

    Apr 23, 2014
    Chicago
    Deciding factor for me is the chunkiness of the neck at the nut... my MIM GC FSR (originally SSH), is chunkier at the nut than nearly ANY Squier Strat I’ve had/played... the one that came the closest was my ‘05 ‘51.
    3678D889-7CA0-493D-B3BF-3DE3AF2705C9.jpeg
    The only Squier Strat I know have is my modded Bullet.
    C7D1393C-94ED-4AC2-A620-0A97F3E6A62B.jpeg
     
  13. Jim Belaye

    Jim Belaye Squier-holic

    Age:
    56
    Jul 25, 2015
    Montréal, Canada
    Thank you
     
  14. DougMen

    DougMen Squier-holic

    Age:
    65
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    FWIW, I looked at specs on some other Strats too. My American Strats, both the Performer and Pro, have a 1.685" nut width.
     
    Jim Belaye likes this.
  15. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer Squier-holic

    Age:
    57
    Nov 24, 2018
    Crappie fishing.
    I'll take my Squier Deluxe and Standard over my MIM Fender any day..
     
  16. jcart

    jcart Squier Talker

    72
    Mar 30, 2014
    western mass
    i purchsed my CV50s Tele a few yrs back from Ebay I was just amazed at what a great guitar it is...since then it has gone few a few changes, and this is the latest version...dual GFS Paf Pros...just a classic rock monster through the JTM45 cvs50 with HH.jpg
     
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  17. Biddlin

    Biddlin Squier-Meister

    Age:
    66
    121
    Apr 15, 2019
    SACRAMENTO. Ca usas
    Although I'm sure this won't come as a surprise to you guys, but being mostly a Gibson guy, I'm surprised at the range of prices on Strats from both brands.
    [​IMG]
    How can Squier make a buck on this @$299.99 ?
    [​IMG]
    This is Fender am. Pro. is nice, but not five times as nice, though still not an outrageous price-$1549.99
    [​IMG]
    But this one for $699 might do the trick perfectly
    And that makes for a horse race between the Squier Standard and the Fender Player. I like both and the feel is very close between the two. Plugged into a big valve amp with 4X12 speakers, the Player sounds tighter. I will probably not buy either, nor the am Pro, but the prices strike me as good.
     
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  18. antiquityscion

    antiquityscion Squier-Meister

    289
    Aug 27, 2012
    phoenix,az
    I'd love to have an American Strat. Anyone who has the means to get one should, if they can and want to. But the two Squier Strats and MIM Fender Strat I have is good enough for me.
     
  19. DougMen

    DougMen Squier-holic

    Age:
    65
    Jun 8, 2017
    Honolulu, HI
    This the best Strat I've ever played at any price, and the best I've ever owned, including my Am Pro, and at $1099 is a steal IMO. 80277.jpg It's the American Performer, which comes in SSS and HSS versions, with maple or rosewood necks, all at $1099.
     
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