disappointed in current stratocaster models

Discussion in 'Squier Stratocasters' started by Raabje, Nov 11, 2019.

  1. fadetoz

    fadetoz Squier-holic

    Age:
    47
    Jun 29, 2011
    IA
    I have a hard time finding exactly what I want with anything offered. That's why I built my Daphne.

    I wanted:
    Alder Body
    Ebony Neck with Jumbo Frets
    Fender Locking Tuners
    American Std String tree
    Sucker Punch 59s - Pickups
    Mint Green Pick Guard
    Aged plastics
    Hard Tail with vintage bent steel Fender stamped saddles.

    So pretty much stuck with building it rather than buy a guitar.

    IMG_20190523_003858.jpg
     
    squierbilly, Robb, Raabje and 3 others like this.
  2. IronSchef

    IronSchef Dr. Squier

    Age:
    57
    Jun 18, 2012
    Flew here on my Dragonfly
    i have had guitars made from Alder, Ash, Agathis, Basswood, Pine, Mahogany, Soft Maple, -- and fretboards made of Maple, Rosewood, Indian Laurel, Pau Ferro, and Ebony

    aside from visual differences and "feel" - I really don't feel that the type of wood has much of an effect (if ANY effect at all) on the "tone" -- virtually every other element in the signal chain (pickups, amp, playing style, etc) has MORE of an effect on tone
     
    bgmacaw, Jim Belaye, TEXINGA and 3 others like this.
  3. Ace38

    Ace38 Squier-holic

    Age:
    48
    Jul 19, 2016
    Tulsa, OK.
    This 100%, but you'll never convince the true believers.
     
  4. Raabje

    Raabje Squier Talker

    Age:
    46
    18
    Oct 1, 2019
    Amsterdam
    This is not a tone wood debate, I only just think, come on Squier, please bring some more balance in the line up, give us a little bit more stratocaster, instead of guitars that look like stratocasters. And what is that classic vibe anyway, just a color scheme? I just don't get it, but I could be the only one with this problem.

    I have read my Fender history book, I know about pine, that's why I said, a pine CV50 could be something, as a third strat next to my 2015 USA standard and 2018 CV50. Before I bought my CV 50 I tried the Player, Vintera's, American Performer. The Perfomer (Penny with maple fretboard) was truly a nice guitar, but the CV50 for me was a better deal. And if my son is a little bit older (10 year at the moment), I think a Fender Player is a nice guitar for him, so I guess that will be my next purchase.
     
  5. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Sep 27, 2014
    nowhere
    You are the only one with this problem. The current lineup is amazing and has a Strat for every kind of player. Vintage, modern Shredder, you name it.....
     
    FhPudd, Jim Belaye, duzie and 4 others like this.
  6. brians

    brians Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Oct 1, 2017
    South Africa
    Yes GM, I agree!!

    Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L22 using Tapatalk
     
    drewcp likes this.
  7. 5ofeight

    5ofeight Squier-holic

    Age:
    61
    Nov 14, 2016
    Glasgow, Scotland
    There must be something wrong with me, Ive never given a rats thought about which woods any of my guitars are made from, do you think if I have some more Guinness this attitude of mine may go away?.

    Seriously though. The Vintage V6 has a solid reputation of being a quality guitar here in the U.K., regarded by some to be much better than anything Fender make.. Infact they rarely come up for sale on the 2nd hand/used market and when they do they are snapped up quickly.
     
    Mr Bones, brians and drewcp like this.
  8. drewcp

    drewcp Squier-holic

    Age:
    35
    Dec 14, 2018
    Saint Paul, MN
    "give us a little bit more stratocaster, instead of guitars that look like stratocasters"

    Fender defines their guitars by their shape. For the most part, if the body is a strat and it's an instrument made by Fender/Squier, then it's a Strat. They are the ones that established this years ago. They make the rules, not you.

    If you haven't noticed by now in this thread, the response you're seeing is very indicative of what people thing in the marketplace as a whole. You are in the very minority in regards to wanting a multinational company to make a custom product just the way you want it, but not charge a custom shop price.

    You'd most likely be better off assembling your own partscaster (at any cost), or...hear me out, just spending more time playing whatever strat is in your budget you can get your hands on
     
    brians, Eddie, Ace38 and 1 other person like this.
  9. Biddlin

    Biddlin Squier-Meister

    Age:
    67
    162
    Apr 15, 2019
    SACRAMENTO. Ca usas
    I think Squier and their parent Fender offer a remarkable selection of instruments at all price points. I agree with others that you are probably better off buying parts to suit your particular taste.
     
  10. fadetoz

    fadetoz Squier-holic

    Age:
    47
    Jun 29, 2011
    IA
    I agree that they do have a great selection of instruments. I'm just picky. I could buy one one pretty much any line and it would be a great guitar that could last the rest of my life.

    There are just options that I prefer that you can't seem to get on stock guitars
     
    Raabje likes this.
  11. mofojar

    mofojar Squier-holic

    Age:
    37
    May 9, 2019
    Calgary, Alberta
    I can confirm that my Player Strat with the factory Floyd, 22 frets and 12" radius is a pretty good modern shredder style guitar with classic Strat looks. 24 frets would be nice, but even the Charvel San Dimas Style 1 guitars (the ones that use Strat bodies) typically top out at 22 frets. The Charvels with the Jackson Dinky bodies usually have 24.

    I do own one 24 fret guitar (an LTD Superstrat) but it's not something I feel is required for my playing style. Yngwie Malmsteen proves that you can shred pretty well on a 21 fret 70's Strat.
     
  12. Rey08

    Rey08 Squier-Meister

    219
    Nov 18, 2017
    Illinois
    I agree with some of your observations. In my view, on the Bullet if you are going to raise the price and promise better tuners, and picture the better sealed tuners in your advertising, and then deliver the old style trap tuners, that is WRONG. False advertising and anyone getting these should complain. I don't mind body wood that much other than Basswood is soft and can have trouble holding screws if you take them out and in several times, like when modding. I do not care for the colors available on the Bullet and wish there was more variety, but that is a personal preference.

    On the Affinity I agree the small nut and string spacing kills the deal for me. After all these years I wish they would correct this. Make it narrow on the Mini if kids with small hands need this. I am aware some people like it narrow, but I think a majority of buyers would prefer it normal, and would allow this model to have more appeal.
     
    Raabje likes this.
  13. jefffam

    jefffam Dr. Squier

    Age:
    61
    Jan 26, 2015
    Portland, TN
    I really could care less what wood is used on any guitar. As long as it holds the screws, does not deaden the sound and balances decently to play, it's good with me.

    Personally I think too many worshipers at the alter of 50's Fender lose track f the real reasons for much of the earliest decade. Leo Fender was an entrepreneur. A very successful one. He did not play guitar. He set out to build a guitar with the absolute minimum investment he could make and sell it for a goodly profit. He did that really well. That also explains the earliest woods etc used. They were the cheapest Leo could get away with and still sell to working musicians. He did it so well, his company has lasted deep into it's 7th decade. He made a great product line that lasts.
     
    so1om likes this.
  14. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Squier

    Sep 27, 2014
    nowhere
    My comments in this thread were wrong and out of line. I was upset that someone didn't like our beloved Squier brand offerings....and I took it personally. I will refrain from negativity from now on. I want to apologize to the entire forum.
     
  15. brians

    brians Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Oct 1, 2017
    South Africa
    On a lighter note, I have currently two favourite guitars, the first is a Squier Bullet and the second is a Squier Bullet.[emoji4]

    I don't obsess what material they are made of, in fact , I never think about:
    Wood vs wood
    Body thickness
    Bridge block thickness
    Tuners vs tuners etc. etc.

    What I do think about:

    How awesome the guitar feels and plays , and how fortunate it is that I can have these guitars that make me happy and are so affordable that it seems that they are actually under priced for what they are.

    And , I can change anything, if I want, without a major stress about changing an expensive and valuable guitar that is already very costly.

    I am a firm convert to the Squier brand. It just works. Granted there are models in the range that aren't going to be my first choice, but there is more than enough choice in models and type of models, that I personally don't have to look for another brand.

    But of course that's just me, if someone wants a Ibanez or PRS or Gibson type guitar, all good, no issues.

    Whatever makes you happy.

    I do believe the Squier brand is a major succes for guitarists, and Fender overall , sets the benchmark for electric guitars in general and have done so since inception.

    But hey, play whichever guitar you choose and be happy.



    Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L22 using Tapatalk
     
    Mr Bones likes this.
  16. brians

    brians Squier-holic

    Age:
    49
    Oct 1, 2017
    South Africa
    Why? I thought you were spot on brother!!

    Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L22 using Tapatalk
     
  17. JVjunky

    JVjunky Squier-Meister

    Age:
    70
    118
    Apr 30, 2019
    United Kingdom
    I have two YN Strats, a '96 and a '97. Both nice solidly built guitars and excellent for modding.
    I've just finished modding my '97. The only thing that I don't like about any Affinity guitars is
    the anaemic satin finish on the necks.

    I sanded mine down to bare wood, used a water based stain and a rattle can of poly gloss.
    Applied new water slide decals and finished off with a couple more coats of gloss.

    pic1.jpg pic4.jpg

     
  18. mofojar

    mofojar Squier-holic

    Age:
    37
    May 9, 2019
    Calgary, Alberta
    I love how you made it look like a CV neck! Makes me want to try doing something like that.
     
    JVjunky likes this.
  19. Raabje

    Raabje Squier Talker

    Age:
    46
    18
    Oct 1, 2019
    Amsterdam
    I won't give up yet with you Squier fanboys :)

    I read in an other topic that the new CV50 leaves something to desired. Bridge/Tremelo and PU's. And in other reports I read the same, quality is a bit below the Chinese CV models.

    So I think if the new CV line are fine guitars straight out of the box, no mods needed, then the flaws in the lower models can be justified. But at the moment there is no Squier top model to step up to . Maybe a more high end Squier model is needed to make the range of models for the Squier brand complete, between the CV models and the Fender Players, aprox. 450 euro value.

    You guys will surely disagree, so let the comments come. And again, it is just my wondering about the current Squier business model. I will find my third stratocaster, no matter what brand or model, sooner or later.
     
  20. drneilmb

    drneilmb Squier-Meister

    Age:
    112
    285
    Jun 8, 2019
    Iowa, USA
    I won't disagree with that at all. There isn't a flagship Squier model. CV is as good as Squier is going to get.

    The Squier brand doesn't need the aspirational top-end models that Fender does. If a buyer's taste gets more and more uppity, then they just move on to the Mexican Fender range.

    Looking at new price points, there does seem to be a fair amount of space between the Squier Contemporary strats at $350 and the cheapest Player series at $675. Where's the $500 model, be it a Fender or a Squier?
     
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