"C" word and "F" word

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by Loin Lover, Jan 11, 2019 at 2:30 PM.

  1. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-Nut

    683
    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    Mrs. Lover has called me numerous things over the decades. I suppose I deserved them all, she can be brutally honest.

    We choose not to use vulgar language. I am guilty of saying shazbot when poking a finger with a 0.009 string, among other times. I'm far from perfect.

    My better half constantly calls me the "c" word. Occasionally someone might throw the "f" word out in my defense. Cheapskate, frugal.

    Although not a hoarder I find it difficult to throw out something I may use in the future. Some day. Maybe. Rope/twine, lumber scraps, nuts/bolts/washers with no mates, short lengths of wire, leaking garden hoses, old PCV valves--all are safe with me. I was called the "c" word for saving/wrapping twine around posts used in my garden. It no doubt came from a HomeDep or Lo lumber run.

    Do you frugally do or save anything others find unusual? I'm not talking about normal stuff such as turning underwear inside out and wearing another day. o_O
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Bluzy

    Bluzy Squier-Meister

    Age:
    53
    460
    Nov 20, 2017
    Hudson Valley, NY
    I like to both keep and the clear it out. Usually I think “why did I keep this?”, throw it out, then find I need it 2 weeks later :(:D
     
  3. dlew919

    dlew919 Squier Talker

    Age:
    50
    25
    Apr 22, 2018
    Belmore
    That woman, Marie kondo (?} who says you should throw out anything that doesn’t give you joy... what a stupid concept. It sounds good superficially, but it doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.

    I’m all for people decluttering or throwing out or keeping whatever. But putting a sham spirituality on it seems to me to be disngenuous.

    Maybe I have too much stuff. I have 2000 books, but I’ve read them all, and I use them in my line of work. 4 guitars, but again, all used. And I’m not throwing out things that have a sentimental value.

    To the op - hang on to it.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    Kenneth Mountain and Loin Lover like this.
  4. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-Nut

    683
    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    I never heard of Ms Kondo. I bet she never found joy in digging through coffee cans full of bolts and finding the exact right one. I really need to organize all that, lol.
     
  5. Lonn

    Lonn Administrator Staff Member

    Age:
    56
    Dec 19, 2009
    Carmel IN
    Admin Post
    I'm a typical American waste monger. I hate having stuff that I know we'll probably never use again. We moved into a new house 2 1/2 years ago and have about 15 boxes of stuff in the garage that never made it in. I say if we've lived without it that long we obviously don't need it. Come spring time I'm giving my wife and daughter one last chance to go through the boxes and then they're gone. They're taking up space I want to use for a workbench.
     
  6. Davis Sharp

    Davis Sharp Squier-holic

    Jan 7, 2016
    Maryland, USA
    Yeah. Unless it's something valuable like jewelry or a guitar, if we haven't used something in years it goes into the donation box or trash, unless I can squeeze a few bucks out of it on eBay.

    I have to balance my anxiety over tossing something that I may need one day with my anxiety over having too much clutter. :)
     
  7. Stratlover84

    Stratlover84 Squier-Nut

    Age:
    34
    564
    Jun 16, 2016
    NY
    I'd say you're more like the "r" word:

    Resourceful ;)
     
  8. jjudas

    jjudas Squier-holic

    Mar 23, 2016
    Metro New Orleans
    I have à tendency to collect things. Not everything...just things that i like.
     
    Kenneth Mountain likes this.
  9. -r3-

    -r3- Squier-Meister

    273
    Jan 28, 2016
  10. Shaytan

    Shaytan Squier-Meister

    Age:
    21
    351
    Apr 10, 2018
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Ah, funny that I often criticise my family exactly for that. Well, when it's taken to an extreme, that is. Jars full of screws and nuts are super useful, every now and then some are needed to fix something around the home, nearly every time the right ones are just stored there. In the garden those pieces of rope can be quite handy when a tree or a plant needs to be tightened to a support stick, too. Now, the damaged hoses, for example...

    Overall, I think it's important to differentiate storing things that may very well be useful at some point, and hoarding. In many cases I agree with my family's mindset when I happen to need some random thing and it happens to be laying around, but in many others I think it's just too much. For a start, our attic could easily be half empty if all the appliance boxes, stored for warranty reasons (though not only those aren't needed nowadays, but also we're talking mostly about things that are over a decade old and in some cases long gone), broken stuff that found its final place there instead of the trash and just random things like piles of old school books that have no purpose anymore and other things that have no hopes of ever being used again were thrown away. In fact, I'll possibly take some drastic measures about that myself soon, given I planed on reserving part of the area to store and work on my bike (the garage is a large open floor shared with all the other neighbours of the building and it requires to have all its lighting on for all the hours I happen to spend there, plus it makes me uncomfortable not being able to work in peace) - yet despite having a perfectly nice place for that, it's impossible right now to do so because of all the trash accomulated there. At home, the wardrobes are completely full, a good half being clothes never used, some rooms (admittedly including my own, though...) could be a lot more spacious if all the unneeded crap was gotten rid of.

    In short, it's a balance between not being wasteful, throwing things you'd likely have to eventually buy again later on, and not falling into the point of accomulating trash just because. As the saying goes, do you really own your things, or do your things own you?
     
    Loin Lover likes this.
  11. jjudas

    jjudas Squier-holic

    Mar 23, 2016
    Metro New Orleans
    I think it's a heathy practice to do a "spring cleaning" on a regular basis and purge one's belongings. It feels good to get rid of crap.
     
    dlew919 and Loin Lover like this.
  12. RegularJim

    RegularJim Squier-Meister

    Age:
    46
    295
    Dec 30, 2017
    Illiconsin, Wisinois
    My weakness is cables. I have a bin in the crawlspace with things like old Coaxial, ethernet, RCA, fire wire, phone cord, etc. Not sure why. Just in case technology goes back 20 years, I guess. You could also find in that bin computer keyboards and mice (the kind with the little rubber ball inside), probably with round connectors, and ZIP drive. I am 99% sure I'll never need any of it, but if I ever do it will be hard to find.
     
    Loin Lover likes this.
  13. Indy Guy

    Indy Guy Squier Talker

    Age:
    61
    11
    Jan 7, 2019
    Greater Indianapolis
    My parent's lived through the great depression and I believe it scarred my Dad the most, he will not throw much of anything away. I tend to be more analytical and will only save stuff I am sure I'll need.
     
    Loin Lover likes this.
  14. surfrodguitar

    surfrodguitar Squier-holic

    Aug 4, 2016
    Laguna Niguel
    I donate and give free stuff we don’t use all the time. Sometimes I kick myself for doing it but at the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter. I bought a vintage surfboard for $15 at a garage sale, fixed it up, rode it once and wasn’t for me. Instead of spending more time surfing it, trying to figure it out. I gave it to my surf buddy for a Bday gift at his 80’s theme party! Perfect! I also just dropped off a 80lb bag of clothes to Goodwill. I know they make $$ off it but that stuff just sat in our closets unworn! Yeah, I do keep a lot of other stuff (had a box of cables for years thinking I would someday use it), I never did, finally gave it away! It’s good to de clutter and free your mind from that “stuff”.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Loin Lover likes this.
  15. Loin Lover

    Loin Lover Squier-Nut

    683
    Jul 26, 2018
    Backwoods, USA
    Similar to depression era folks are small farm folks, at least in the 60s & 70s. We had to fabricate and build. If we, or a neighbor who was probably on our telephone party line, had a bolt/pin/widget to repair something it was huge. We lived 13 miles out of town, 10 were gravel. A neighbor or friend with a cutting torch and welder was priceless.

    As an example we never bought fence posts. Life expectancy of cedar fence posts is 5-7 years. Cut, split, build, replace. Repeat.
     
  16. Indy Guy

    Indy Guy Squier Talker

    Age:
    61
    11
    Jan 7, 2019
    Greater Indianapolis
    My parents were raised on farms as well. One of my uncles followed the wheat harvest like the folks in "Grapes Of Wrath" that's probably why they are so frugal.
     
    Loin Lover likes this.