'50s Sci-Fi Movies-- Anyone else love 'em?

Discussion in 'V.C.'s Parlor' started by duceditor, Mar 25, 2018.

  1. blackspider57

    blackspider57 Squier-Meister

    Age:
    60
    386
    Mar 11, 2017
    Great Falls Montana
    I was too young to see any of these in the theatre
    but loved them all on late night T.V. in the sixties.
    Still, enjoy them today.
    Except for the final scene, The alligator people was pretty darn creepy. The thing from outer space (James Arness was the thing) and his brother Peter Graves starred in quite a few as well.
     
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  2. daan

    daan Squier-holic

    Oct 21, 2013
    Twin Cities
    I love this thread! I’m so gonna watch something from this on my next day off!

    A serious question here: What do you guys think of “Godzilla” and other movies of that ilk? I know they were from a different era, but I think they’re as fun to watch as B-grade drive in stuff.
     
  3. daan

    daan Squier-holic

    Oct 21, 2013
    Twin Cities
    Oh yeah, some friends of mine, who went to film school, made a VERY serious effort to buy an old abandoned drive-in theater near the Twin Cities (just across the river from Stillwater MN, actually). They were going to restore the place and reopen it as The Atomic Drive In! They had a whole business plan drawn up, promotional materials, ads on their Public Acess tv show, it was completely serious. The plan was, to show a constant stream of B-grade drive in fare, along with their own movies. (They made two that I know of, that “Troma”, (the “Toxic Avenger” people) have released. It was gonna be SO awesome! Unfortunately the real estate the drive-in was located on was so valuable that a developer swooped in and outbid them. :(
     
  4. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    That would have been SO cool!

    Yes, I remember drive ins. (I think I may have even actually viewed a few minutes of the movie once.)

    Oh, that time period! A quick stop at McDonalds or Wetson's burgers. 85 cents got you three burgers, a shake and some fries. Then the drive in -- which you payed by the car, but it couldn't ne over packed so we'd put some of the gang in the trunk. They'd scatter after entering. Two couples were all you wanted in the car. OH, AND KEEP YOUR EYES TO YOURSELF! Easy rule to follow. We were busy.

    Yes, that was the innocent `50s life. Kids just "made out."


    A lot of kids were way into them. Me not so much. Can't say why.

    There was one such though, called The Mysterians, that was of that ilk. It likely stunk, but I'd love to see it again. For some reason it had a long run -- enough to draw me and my pals in a couple of times. :D

    * * * * *

    BTW, has anyone seen "Alien Trespass"? It was a 2009 affectionate "remake" of `50s sci-fi. Not so much "good" as fun. Amazingly close in feel to the originals, but with a bit of exaggeration and tongue-in-cheek.



    -don
     
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  5. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Hah! Found this!



    -don
     
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  6. MrSinister

    MrSinister Squier-Meister

    377
    Sep 24, 2017
    Earth
    Fiend Without A Face. Brains and spinal cords flying through the air. Good times.
     
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  7. ADLGMT8

    ADLGMT8 Squier-Meister

    190
    Jan 6, 2018
    NA
    My favourite 1950s Sci-Fi film is Forbidden Planet, one of the most aesthetically pleasing films I've seen. The story is really solid too albeit with a few problems. Cool incidental music too.
    h-HO00001239.jpeg
     
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  8. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    "Stuff",Sir?? hqdefault.jpg
    :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
     
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  9. Shine

    Shine Squier-Meister

    256
    Nov 29, 2016
    Rings of Saturn
    Bob Wilkins was a local hero when I was a kid. Creature Features was a blast that introduced me to many movies like those in this thread. A cool dude showing creepy movies.

    www.bobwilkins.net
     
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  10. Strumboli

    Strumboli Squier Talker

    Age:
    50
    12
    Oct 15, 2017
    Melbourne
    I'm a huge fan(atic)! Ishiro Honda is my hero! Godzilla, Rodan, Mysterians - all fabulous '50s servings. The '60s stuff was terrific too.

    Other '50s sci-fi faves - When Worlds Collide, It Came From Outer Space, Target Earth, 20 Million Miles To Earth, It! The Terror From Beyond Space, 4D Man... plus everything else already mentioned! :p Forbidden Planet is a stand-out, fersure...

    I'd rate Journey To The Center Of The Earth as sci-fi? That was a classic too.
     
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  11. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    In NY we had John Zacherly. He was an institution.


    [​IMG]

    Maybe the biggest thrill of my childhood was sending in a song -- lyrics sung to the song Tom Dooley -- and having Zacharley sing it on the show!


    Lift up your head Larry Talbot
    Lift up your head and howl
    Lift up you head Larry Talbot
    Because the full moon's coming out

    This time tomorrow
    Reckon where I'll be
    Down in Transyvania
    With good old Zacherley!​



    So many of us got to know the now classic Universal monster films that way. In shows like that on small black and white TVs.

    :)

    -don


     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
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  12. mikm

    mikm Dr. Squier

    Jun 4, 2012
    NY
    How about this one...Invasion of the Saucer Men. I remember comedian Frank Gorshin was in it! Invasion_of_the_Saucer_Men.jpg
     
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  13. mikm

    mikm Dr. Squier

    Jun 4, 2012
    NY
    Last night on TCM they played 50s sci fi all night! All the movies were radioactive/atomic age themed! I stayed up for a few. Anybody else catch it?
     
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  14. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    You know I've never seen that! Heard of it, of course, but not seen it.

    The creatures in the poster look like the ones in a much later film. (I am trying to remember its name. Jack Nicholson was in it -- I think as the President. )

    -don
     
  15. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    Ah yes... this one. Mars Attacks!"





    -don
     
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  16. frankthedog

    frankthedog Squier-Meister

    402
    May 17, 2010
    SE Ohio
    Isn't this why we all loved Mystery Science Theater?
     
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  17. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    Edit for fat fingers,..
     
  18. Afrika61

    Afrika61 Squier-Nut

    100%_Godzilla_Approved.jpg
     
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  19. Ralph124C41

    Ralph124C41 Squier-holic

    Feb 10, 2016
    Btw, I recently saw what I guess was the first version of Godzilla, King of the Monsters! -- the one without those scenes with Raymond Burr. It was IIRW just had subtitles.

    According to Wikipedia, the North American release, which I saw as a child, had 16 minutes of its "politicial, social and anti-nuclear" content removed and the Burr material included. I admit I do like the version with Burr better.
     
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  20. duceditor

    duceditor Dr. Squier

    Age:
    71
    May 29, 2014
    The Monadnocks, NH USA
    As is my want I gave this some thought, and now I think I do know why.

    Sci-fi of the fifties was in several ways much like another genre: The American western. Both were entirely of the culture and for both genres that was part of their appeal.

    They both focused on situations of public risk, and then found the answer in the actions of an individual, often an outsider -- one who is generally seen as unimportant and insignificant.

    In the western genre such were Shane, the gunfighter who enters the community by chance, acts on principle beyond self, and saves that community from an 'alien' force -- he then moves on.

    Another example is High Noon, where Will Kane is himself threatened by a murderous 'alien' force -- and finds himself totally alone, everyone else in denial with proffered excuses. Kane, too, saves the town. Then he moves on.

    Fifties sci-fi in much like that. The "hero" is typically a nobody -- the teenager from outside the group -- such as "Steve" played by Steve McQueen in The Blob. Or the quiet geologist in "The Monolith Monsters" -- each of whom takes charge, first for the care of an early victim of the 'monster', (the old man in The Blob, the little school girl in the Monolith Monsters), then for the entire town when the police (The Blob) or the state's governor (The Monolith Monsters) gets tied up with 'more important' things.

    There are popular westerns and sci-fi made elsewhere -- Sergio Leone's the Man With No Name series for instance, and sci-fi such as the popular Japanese monster films (of which Godzilla is just one). These have much to recommend them, but are culturally very different from what American fifties sci-fi was and culturally represented. Indeed -- and interestingly -- they are in many ways much more akin to what today's society has become. -Where individuals are at best anti-heroes. -Where communal salvation comes -- if it comes at all -- not so much from an individual putting himself on the line, but from the top down -- the work of government agencies and the like. A world where everyday men and women are basically seen as victims; as mere fodder, grist for the mill.

    It'd be easy (and for me, admittedly, rather fun) ;) to go into some of the situations and events that are presently wracking our nation and dissect how they exemplify this very same cultural change -- but I won't. Not here. (Maybe on my blog?) But how interesting to see how, even unrealized, there was in my pre-teen years a strong attachment to that old, and to some outdated, American ideal. That mythologized in these film forms philosophy was a view of life that played a key part in my personal love for them. Jut as is so today. -That the individual, acting with conscience and strength, is central to the very meaning of life.

    Thanks for asking. Such an interesting, interesting, realization! :)

    -don
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
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